Woodson's classic work of criticism explores how the education received by blacks has failed to give them an appreciation of themselves as a race and their contributions to history. Woodson puts forward a program that calls for the educated to learn about their past and serve the black community. (Education/Teaching)
The Mis-Education of the Negro by Dr. Carter G. Woodson follows the thesis that African-Americans of Woodson's day were being culturally indoctrinated rather than taught in American schools. This conditioning, he claims, causes African-Americans to become dependent and to seek out inferior places in the greater society of which they are a part. Woodson challenges his readers to become autodidacts and to "do for themselves," regardless of what they were taught.
Book Includes: The Mis-education of the Negro, Stolen Legacy and The Willie Lynch Letter
Dr. Jeff Menzise has taken on the monumental task of reflecting on the bold and timeless work of Dr. Carter G. Woodson (The Mis-Education of the Negro). He unapologetically engages in a conversation with Dr. Woodson, bringing his original ideas forward into the 21st century by introducing his own thoughts and perspectives to this worldwide issue that should concern everyone. Written with the same candor and tone as Dr. Woodson's work, Dr. Menzise presents his thoughts in plain language, making this work accessible to anyone interested in educating, raising, and developing healthy children.
Challenging the notion that civilization started in Greece, this uncompromising classic attempts to prove that the true authors of Greek philosophy were not Greeks but Egyptians. The text asserts that the praise and honor blindly given to the Greeks for centuries rightfully belong to the people of Africa, and argues that the theft of this great African legacy led to the erroneous world opinion that the African continent has made no contribution to civilization. Quoting such celebrated Greek scholars as Herodotus, Hippocrates, Aristotle, Thales, and Pythagoras, who admit to the influence of Egyptian studies in their work, this edition sheds new light on traditional philosophical and historical thought. Originally published in 1954, this book features a new introduction.
A facsimile of the 1922 edition of "The Negro in Our History," by Carter G. Woodson, Ph.D. An essential book for African American libraries and collections.
In reprinting these orations the editor has endeavored to present them here as nearly as possible in their original form. No effort has been made to improve the English. Published in this form, then, these orations will be of value not only to persons studying the development of the Negro in his use of a modern idiom but also in the study of the history of the race. It is in this spirit that these messages are again given to the public.
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