This first collection of Emerson's essays has influenced a host of thinkers and intellectuals since its first appearance in 1841. 'Self-Reliance' is undoubtedly the collection's most famous essay, a piece in which Emerson argues that one must put a wholehearted trust in the power of one's own intuition, and not hold to orthodox opinions merely because the mass of people believe them to be true. But the prestige surrounding this work has tended to obscure the breadth of Emerson's vision: in the twelve essays in 'Series One' he invites us to consider a wide range of topics, from the true nature of 'Friendship', 'Heroism' and 'Love', to the high-flown philosophy of 'Spiritual Laws' and 'The Over-Soul'.
A soul-satisfying collection of 12 essays by the noted philosopher and poet who embraced independence, rejected conformity, and loved nature. Includes the title essay, plus "Character," "Intellect," "Spiritual Laws," "Circles," and others.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, and poet, who led the Transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States. Self Reliance essay contains the most thorough statement of one of Emerson's recurrent themes, the need for each individual to avoid conformity and false consistency, and follow his or her own instincts and ideas. It is the source of one of Emerson's most famous quotations: "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines." Self-Reliance is Ralph Waldo Emerson’s compilation of many years’ works and the archetype for his transcendental philosophies. Emerson presupposes that the mind is initially subject to an unhappy conformism.
Six essays and one address outline Emerson's moral idealism and hint at later scepticism. In addition to title essay, this volume includes "History," "Friendship," "The Over-Soul," "The Poet" and "Experience," plus the Harvard Divinity School Address.
Representative sampling of Thoreau's most frequently read and cited essays: "On the Duty of Civil Disobedience" (1849), "Life without Principle" (1863), "Slavery in Massachusetts" (1854), "A Plea for Captain John Brown" (1869) and "Walking" (1862).
The six essays and one address in this volume flesh out Emerson's transcendentalist ideas. In addition to the celebrated title essay, the others included here are "History," "Friendship," "The Over-Soul," "The Poet" and "Experience," plus the famous Harvard Divinity School Address.
Andrew Holmes’ interpretation of Emerson’s Self-Reliance illustrates the timeless nature of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s insights into human nature by bringing them to life in a contemporary context, providing an entertaining and highly practical guide to one of the most influential self-help books of all time.
DIVCarefully selected passages from 55 years of journal entries: thoughts, religious sentiments, impressions of books, authors and contemporaries, much more. Revealing record of man behind formidable thinker, poet, essayist. /div
Essays spanning 4 centuries reflect the wit, wisdom, and common sense of a number of distinguished English writers. Includes works by Addison, Swift, Johnson, Goldsmith, Lamb, Woolf, Shaw, and others.
Politician, soldier, naturalist, and historian — Theodore Roosevelt remains a towering symbol of American optimism and progress. This collection embodies his enduring ideals for attaining a robust political, social, and personal life.

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