The Myth of Capitalism tells the story of how America has gone from an open, competitive marketplace to an economy where a few very powerful companies dominate key industries that affect our daily lives. Digital monopolies like Google, Facebook and Amazon act as gatekeepers to the digital world. Amazon is capturing almost all online shopping dollars. We have the illusion of choice, but for most critical decisions, we have only one or two companies, when it comes to high speed Internet, health insurance, medical care, mortgage title insurance, social networks, Internet searches, or even consumer goods like toothpaste. Every day, the average American transfers a little of their pay check to monopolists and oligopolists. The solution is vigorous anti-trust enforcement to return America to a period where competition created higher economic growth, more jobs, higher wages and a level playing field for all. The Myth of Capitalism is the story of industrial concentration, but it matters to everyone, because the stakes could not be higher. It tackles the big questions of: why is the US becoming a more unequal society, why is economic growth anemic despite trillions of dollars of federal debt and money printing, why the number of start-ups has declined, and why are workers losing out.
In the West, innovations in new public management (NPM) have been regarded as part of the neoliberal project, whilst in China, these reforms have emerged from a very different economic and social landscape. Despite these differences however, similar measures to those introduced in the West have been adopted by the Chinese state, which has largely abandoned the planned economy and adopted market mechanisms in the pursuit of improved economic efficiency and growth. Evaluating the results of these reforms in both China and the West between 1978 and 2011, this book shows that despite substantial improvements in economic efficiency in both cases under consideration, there have been considerable negative impacts on the distribution of wealth, access to public services, levels of poverty, public health, and the incidence of crime. Further, this book explores the different results of NPM in China and the West and the conclusions Paolo Urio draws have timely significance, as he suggests that China has been able to change its policies more rapidly and thus more effectively respond to the challenges posed by the current economic crisis. Drawing on both Western and Chinese sources, this innovative book compares the consequences of their public management reforms, taking into account the impact on both the economy and society. As such, this book will be of great interest to students and scholars working in the fields of Chinese studies, Asian studies, business, economics, strategic public management and comparative studies in capitalism and socialism.
This work is divided into two autonomous books. The first book, The State, represents a radically new political system of society, one which is the most democratic system ever possible! This is a completely new society, a real civil society, which otherwise in the capitalist system is only a utopia. In this book, I scrutinize the principles of scientific socialism; i.e., all those principles of Marxism concerning the state that build socialism as a political system. The second book, The Economic Theory of Socialism, is a sequel, and as far as I know, the only sequel of the greatest work by Karl Marx – Capital. The economics of socialism makes Marx’s socialism already completely possible. In this book, I scrutinize the economic laws that build socialism as a more effective economic system than capitalism. These laws are extracted from Marx’s main work – Capital. From 1917 to 1991, the totalitarian system in USSR and East Europe was called socialism, and even by the scientific nonsense and absurd names of communism and communist system. In this system, the official ideology was allegedly Marxism, but really it could not endure any Marxist criticism. There was never any socialism anywhere! In the twentieth century, we passed through a system of utopian socialism as proof that this was not socialism that was not possible, but for the utopia of writers before and after Marx. We were visited by a utopian socialism, which at the contemporary stage is simply capitalism – state, monopolistic. There is no better application of Keynes’s doctrine than the “socialism” of the twentieth century. His “planned capitalism” is actually “planned socialism.”
Imagine this: a mere century ago, the purchasing power of an average American was one-tenth of what it is today. But what will it take to sustain that growth through the next century? And what can be said about economic growth to aspiring nations seeking higher standards of living for their citizens? In this important book, William Baumol, Robert Litan, and Carl Schramm contend that the answers to these questions lie within capitalist economies, though many observers make the mistake of believing that capitalism is of a single kind. Writing in an accessible style, the authors dispel that myth, documenting four different varieties of capitalism, some "Good" and some "Bad" for growth. The authors identify the conditions that characterise Good Capitalism: the right blend of entrepreneurial and established firms, which can vary among countries; as well as the features of Bad Capitalism. They examine how countries catching up to the United States can move faster toward the economic frontier, while laying out the need for United States itself to stick to and reinforce the recipe for growth that has enabled it to be the leading economic force in the world. This path-breaking book is a must read for any one who cares about global growth and how to ensure America's economic future.
This text is part of a series of five volumes which offers a comprehensive overview of the regulation approach to capitalism and its crisis-tendencies. Edited by a major British contributor to the approach, the volumes contain not only key theoretical and empirical works from French regulationists but also representative work from other regulation schools and scholars. They also feature major critiques of the approach.
In this article, the author attempts to demonstrate that the study of inland fisheries can provide additional insight into the culture of the Meybrat, a tribal community living around the Ayamaru lakes in the northern part of the Western Bird's Head of Irian Jaya.

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