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The sock-blasting, jaw-dropping, side-swiping phenomenon that is QI serves up a sparkling new selection of 1,342 facts that will leave you flabbergasted. 1,342 QI Facts coincides with more good news from QI, as Sandi Toksvig takes over the duties as presenter on the double-BAFTA nominated TV show, and the QI Elves' podcast No Such Thing As A Fish wins its second Chortle award. The first pencils were used to draw on sheep. More people work for Walmart than live in Slovenia. The beaded lacewing stuns its prey by farting on it. The allies considered dropping glue to stick Nazi troops to the ground. The only life on Earth for a billion years was a thick layer of slime. Scientists call it 'the boring billion'. On the anniversary of landing, the Mars Curiosity rover hummed 'Happy Birthday' to itself. 'Flabbergasted' was first recorded in a 1772 list of new words alongside 'bored'.
Did you know that: cows moo in regional accents; the entire internet weighs less than a grain of sand; the dialling code from Britain to Russia is 007; potatoes have more chromosomes than human beings; the London Underground has made more money from its famous map than it has from running trains; Tintin is called Tantan in Japanese because TinTin is pronounced 'Chin chin' and means penis; the water in the mouth of a blue whale weighs more than its body; Scotland has twice as many pandas as Conservative MPs; Saddam's bunker was designed by the grandson of the woman who built Hitler's bunker; Under the Wildlife and Countryside Act of 1981, it is explicitly illegal in Britain to use a machinegun to kill a hedgehog. 1,227 QI Facts To Blow Your Socks Off will make you look at the universe (and your socks) in an alarming new way.
The New York Times best-selling authors of the QI series return with a fourth collection of mind-bending trivia. The New York Times best-selling authors of the Quite Interesting series have made you see sideways, knocked your socks off, and left your jaw on the floor. Now John Lloyd, John Mitchinson, and James Harkin are back to offer even more—1,234, to be exact—shocking, enlightening, downright-fun facts that will leave you speechless…and pantomiming for more. Did you know? The Big Bang was not as loud as a Motörhead concert. Abraham Lincoln was a licensed bartender. According to the company that created her, Hello Kitty isn’t a cat. Albert Einstein’s eyeballs are in a safety deposit box in New York. McDonald’s once created bubble-gum-flavored broccoli. It is impossible to hum and whisper at the same time. Convinced it’s all hogwash? Visit QI.com/US1234 for proof of the veracity of every fact. Want more? Check out 1,411 Quite Interesting Facts to Knock You Sideways, 1,339 Quite Interesting Facts to Make Your Jaw Drop, and 1,227 Quite Interesting Facts to Blow Your Socks Off.
Nev’s unorthodox management style, which involves compulsory sing-a-longs, matchmaking attempts, arm wrestling bouts and the use of very direct language delivered at high volume, often puts him at odds with HR. But, as CEO and founder of Save Britain Money, which turns over £60m a year, and which recently came second in a competition to find the best company to work for in the UK, Nev’s skills are undisputed. And now, in Happy People Sell, Nev will, for the first time, share the secrets of his success. With chapters including SWSWSWN (Some Will, Some Won’t, So What? Next!), Dial with a Smile, Proper Planning Prevents Piss-Poor Performance, I Favour Those with a Glide in their Slide and The Heart of the Matter is a Matter of the Heart, Nev offers his own, no-nonsense vision of empire building and corporate administration. Case studies featuring popular call centre staff, including tea-lady Hayley who excelled in Episode 3 at organising a piss-up in a brewery, will appear throughout – though HR have added their own notes when Nev wasn't looking. As Nev would say, 'GET IN HERE, NOW!'
Following the sensational success of 1,227 QI Facts to Blow Your Socks Off, the QI team returns with a fresh stack of facts to astonish and enlighten. In this fixed-format ebook edition you can get the facts laid out as they intended, four to a page and curiously linked. Pigs suffer from anorexia. Wagner always wore pink silk underwear. Rugby School's first official rugby kit in 1871 included a bow tie. Lord Kitchener had four spaniels called Shot, Bang, Miss and Damn. It is impossible to whistle in a spacesuit. J. K Rowling has no middle name. The first computer mouse was made of wood. If there are any facts you don't believe, or if you want to know more about them, all the sources can be found on QI's website.
'Fifty years into my life journey I realise that, while I love remote wild places and the peoples I meet there, it is in forests that I find the greatest joy. Of all the forests that I have explored, it is the great circumpolar Boreal forest of the North that calls to me most. Here is a landscape where bush knowledge really counts and where experience counts even more ... This book has been thirty years in the making.' Out on the Land is an absorbing exploration of, and tribute to, the circumpolar Boreal forest of the North: its landscape, its people, their cultures and skills, the wilderness that embodies it, and its immense beauty. The book is vast in scope and covers every aspect of being in the wilderness in both winter and summer (clothing, kit, skills, cooking, survival), revealing the age-old traditions and techniques, and how to carry them out yourself. It also includes case studies of early explorers, as well as modern-day adventurers who found themselves stranded in the forest and forced to work out a way to survive. So much more than a bushcraft manual, this book goes deeper, to the traditions and cultures that gave us these skills, as well as focusing on the detail itself. Ray and Lars's practical advice is wound around a deep love for the forest, respect and admiration for the people who live there and sheer enjoyment of the stunning scenery.
The Third Book of General Ignorance gathers together 180 questions, both new and previously featured on the BBC TV programme's popular 'General Ignorance' round, and show why, when it comes to general knowledge, none of us knows anything at all. Who invented the sandwich? What was the best thing before sliced bread? Who first ate frogs' legs? Which cat never changes its spots? What did Lady Godiva do? What can you legally do if you come across a Welshman in Chester after sunset?

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