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The late 1960s was an interesting time in the automotive world. Muscle cars, as we now know them, were well established, with all manufacturers joining the horsepower race. You could walk into the showroom for any brand from any manufacturer and find a variety of performance models. Competition being what it is, the manufacturers were looking for ways other than winning races to lure buyers into the showrooms and entice them to buy their products. Some tried to accomplish this with fancy marketing schemes and graphic paint packages and decals, and for the first time, some tried to win over buyers with price. Volume No. 5 of CarTech's In Detail series covers the 1969 Plymouth Road Runner. It was an interesting marriage of a car that attempted to appeal to potential buyers with a low cost, light weight, and potent bare-bones package. It also added a brilliant marketing strategy of partnering with a famous studio and a popular cartoon character. The end result was a wildly popular, big-block, affordable muscle car with great graphics and a cool beep-beep horn. The public loved it. All In Detail Series books include an introduction and historical overview, an explanation of the design and concepts involved in creating the car, a look at marketing and promotion, and an in-depth study of all hardware and available options, as well as an examination of where the car is on the market today. Also included is an appendix of paint and option codes, VIN and build-tag decoders, as well as production numbers.
By 1969, the muscle car war among Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler had reached a fevered pitch. Plymouth's Road Runner, Mopar's intermediate entry, was leading the charge. For 1970, the Road Runner had its strongest year yet as it housed the best street V-8s Chrysler had to offer. Author Scott Ross retraces the history of the Road Runner and brings the 1970 model year into full focus. The stripped-down Road Runner exemplified the essence of a purpose-built muscle car: brute power and stunning acceleration. A new aggressive grille and Air Grabber hood provided an audacious yet tasteful performance statement. The back-to-basics 'Bird had a unique character with its iconic cartoon Road Runner graphics and beep-beep horn.

Underneath the skin, the Road Runner lived up to its persona. The 335-hp 383 was one of fastest 383s Chrysler built because it was fitted with the 440 camshaft, heads, and manifolds for even more performance. The 440 Six Pack car generated 390 hp and gained a reputation as a stout street performer. And at the top, the conservatively rated 425-hp 426 Hemi set the standard for performance. The Road Runner was lighter than the Cuda and somewhat overbuilt as it was one of the toughest and most consistent muscle cars. To transfer all this power to the ground, the Road Runner was equipped with the A-833 4-speed or TorqueFlite 727 automatic. With a torsion-bar suspension and heavy-duty rear end, the Road Runner handled well. However, these are just a few of the highlights of this complete story. Each volume in the In Detail Series provides an introduction and historical overview, an explanation of the design and concepts involved in creating the car, a look at marketing and promotion, an in-depth study of all hardware and available options, as well as an examination of where the car is on the market today. Also included are paint and option codes, VIN and build tag decoders, as well as production numbers.

When the Barracuda arrived in the Plymouth lineup in mid-1964, it was given an unbearable task: compete against the new Ford Mustang. Out the gate, it was outsold by a 6 to 1 margin. Barracuda could always compete with Mustang in the performance category, but aesthetically it just wasn't accepted like its Ford Mustang and Chevrolet Camaro counterparts. That was until 1970, when a complete re-design in the E-Body platform turned the tide. In terms of performance, the 1970-1974 Barracudas and Challengers were every bit the measure of the Ford and GM offerings. By 1971, the handsome Barracuda had established itself as one of the best-performing cars in the marketplace. Ordering the ’Cuda, owners could lay waste to Mustang and Camaro owners with such stout engine packages as the 440-6 and 426 Hemi. Sales numbers never did match that of its cross-town rivals, but in the end, the 1971 ’Cuda won the war. No other mass-production Pony Car can consistently claim asking prices of $2,000,000 its top model (in today's prices). As in all In Detail Series books, you get an introduction and historical overview, an explanation of the design and concepts involved in creating the car, a look at marketing and promotion, an in-depth study of all hardware and available options, as well as an examination of where the car is on the market today. Also included are paint and option codes, VIN and build tag decoders, as well as production numbers.
In the world of archeology nothing compares to the discovery. Whether it’s related to King Tut’s tomb, the Titanic, or Amelia Earhart, the uncovering of an artifact outdoes all the research; work; and blood, sweat, and tears into a singular rush of adrenaline. In the world of the muscle car, some of the greatest creations are still waiting to be discovered. This book is a collection of stories written by enthusiasts about their quest to find these extremely rare and valuable muscle cars. You find four categories (Celebrity, Rare, Race Cars, and Concept/Prototype/Show Cars) within three genres (Missing, Lost History, Recently Discovered) that take you through the search for some of the most sought after muscle cars with names such as Shelby, Yenko, Hurst, and Hemi. Along the way, success stories including finding the first Z/28 Camaro, the 1971 Boss 302, and the 1971 Hemi 'Cuda convertible will make you wonder if you could uncover the next great muscle car find. Lost Muscle Cars includes 45 intriguing stories involving some of the most significant American iron ever created during the celebrated muscle car era. Readers will be armed with the tools to begin the quest to make the next great discovery in automotive archaeology!
The history of Chrysler Corporation is, in many ways, a history of a company floundering from one financial crisis to the next. While that has given shareholders fits for nearly a century, it has also motivated the Pentastar company to create some of the most outrageous, and collectible, cars ever built in the United States. From the moment Chrysler unleashed the Firepower hemi V-8 engine on the world for the 1951 model year, they had been cranking out the most powerful engines on the market. Because the company pioneered the use of lightweight unibody technology, it had the stiffest, lightest bodies in which to put those most powerful engines, and that is the basic muscle-car formula: add one powerful engine to one light car. When the muscle car era exploded onto the scene, Chrysler unleashed the mighty Mopar muscle cars, the Dodges and Plymouths that defined the era. Fabled nameplates like Charger, Road Runner, Super Bee, 'Cuda, and Challenger defined the era and rank among the most valuable collector cars ever produced by an American automaker. Featuring cars from the incomparable Brothers' Collection, The Art of Mopar: Chrysler, Dodge, and Plymouth Muscle Cars celebrates these cars in studio portraits using the light-painting process perfected by Tom Loeser. It is the ultimate portrayal of the ultimate muscle cars.

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