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When Keith and Brenda first meet and get married, producing a child with special needs was the last thing on their mind. After enduring a very problematic pregnancy, Brenda gives birth to their new son Brett. The events revolving around Brett's birth would set off a chain of events changing all of their lives forever. Devastated after their son is diagnosed with cerebral palsy at the age of one, Keith and Brenda go into a downward spiral of guilt and blame. Within a few years these emotions would explode late one evening leaving them with only one choice. They decided to have Brett's birth investigated to find out what actually caused his cerebral palsy. It would eventually take several years and a roller coaster ride of events before they finally find out what caused their son's disability.
Copper Mountain College's own Cheyenne Bonnell,PHD give's her review of the book as SCARED IN A HOUSE CALLED LOVE, Rose Whittington's touching memoir of her journey from chilhood to maturity, is a remarkable book in several ways. First, it is remarkable that Rose survived her childhood and became the loving, caring, energetic, and determined person that I know her to be today. Her story is remarkable, also, in the way that it is told. Rose allows the story to unfurl from the child's perspective. Readers experience her childhood the way that Rose did herself. The neglect and abuse Rose suffers is just a part of the world in which she is growing up, and because she writes her narrative from that naive and innocent perspective, readers can experience the horror of her childhood. Rose, an open-hearted and ever hopeful child,distinctively protects the abusive adults on whom she depends; their sordid and immoral lives become so normative, so seeminglly normal to her, that it becomes almost impossible for her not to become just like them. And even so, raised in a climate of low self-esteem, an atmosphere saturated with sex, drugs, violence, spousal abuse, lying, infidelity, and thievery, Rose's true and caring nature triumphs. Although she was scared in a house called love, she hopes to prevent it from happening to others by remembering the pain that she felt and telling her story so that others will not have to live through her pain.
A revelatory memoir of one woman’s life with disability, depression, acceptance, and ultimately, love. Fran MacIlvey’s life had a difficult path from the moment she came into the world. Her mother, living in the Belgian Congo in the 1960s, had known she was pregnant with a daughter. But she didn’t know she was pregnant with two. By the time the doctors responded, one hour too late, Fran was born with cerebral palsy. Growing up disabled, Fran always felt different. While other children played, she could only watch. She grew up feeling like a frozen spectator, the observer of an unjust world that moved effortlessly around her. Juvenile hurt turned into adult anger, self-hatred, and suicidal depression—until the day when someone saw past her limitations, launching Fran on a journey of introspection, self-acceptance, and love. Exploring Fran’s million and one mistakes and successes on the path to peace and joy, Trapped is a revealing and honest meditation on what it means to live with disabilities—a beacon of hope and a powerful lesson in understanding.
Pediatric Home Care is a practice-based text perfect for either students or for supporting pediatric nurses practicing in a home-care setting. The text includes a variety of nursing information required for this type of care across a large spectrum of physiologic categories and acuity levels. The Third Edition has been completely revised and updated to reflect the most current practice and technology and includes a new focus on evidence based practice.
This is a gripping medical narrative that brings readers into the complex world of newborn intensive care, where brilliant but imperfect doctors do all they can to coax life into their tiny, injured patients. Dr. Adam Wolfberg--journalist, physician specializing in high-risk pregnancies, and father to a child born weighing under two pounds--describes his daughter Larissa's precipitous birth at six months, which left her tenuously hanging on to life in an incubator. Ultrasound had diagnosed a devastating hemorrhage in her brain that doctors reasoned would give her only a 50 percent chance of having a normal IQ. With the knowledge that their daughter could be severely impaired for life, Adam and his wife, Kelly, consider whether to take Larissa off life-support. As they make decisions about live-saving care in the first hours of a premature infant's life, doctors and parents must grapple with profound ethical and scientific questions: Who should be saved? How aggressively should doctors try to salvage the life of a premature baby, who may be severely neurologically and physically impaired? What will that child's quality of life be like after millions of dollars are spent saving him or her? Wolfberg explores the fits and starts of physicians, government policy makers, and lawyers who have struggled over the years to figure out the best way to make these wrenching decisions. Through Larissa's early hospital course and the struggle to decide what is best for her, Wolfberg examines the limitations of newborn intensive-care medicine, neuroplasticity, and decision making at the beginning of life. Featuring high-profile scientific topics and explanatory medical reporting, this is the first book to explore the profound emotional and ethical issues raised by advancing technology that allows us to save the lives of increasingly undeveloped preemies.
One woman’s true story of raising a child born three months premature—“propulsive, startling, and vivid, like motherhood itself” (Meg Wolitzer, New York Times–bestselling author of The Female Persuasion). Vicki Forman gave birth to Evan and Ellie, weighing only one pound each, at twenty-three weeks’ gestation. During the delivery she begged the doctors to “let her babies go”—knowing all too well that at their early stage of development they would likely die and, if they survived, would have a high risk of permanent disabilities. However, California law demanded resuscitation. Her daughter died just four days later; her son survived and was indeed multiply disabled: blind, nonverbal, and dependent on a feeding tube. This Lovely Life tells, with brilliant intensity, of what became of the Forman family after the birth of the twins—the harrowing medical interventions and ethical considerations involving the sanctity of life and death. In the end, the long-delayed first steps of a five-year-old child will seem like the fist-pumping stuff of a triumph narrative. Forman’s intelligent voice gives a sensitive, nuanced rendering of her guilt, her anger, and her eventual acceptance in this portrait of a mother’s fierce love for her children. “Intimate, compelling, and hopeful—an absolutely important book.” —Rachel Simon, author of Riding the Bus with My Sister
In Journey into Personhood Ruth Webb tells the story of an individual born with severe cerebral palsy who struggles to become a person in her own eyes as well as in the opinion of those around her. By developing both the inner ability to learn, live, and work independently and the outer ability to convince others to give her the freedom to do so - physically and emotionally - Webb earned a Ph.D. in counseling and guidance. With that validation of her intelligence and competence, she entered upon a fulfilling career working with mentally retarded people and other people with disabilities.

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