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"Chemists familiar with conventional quantum mechanics will applaud and benefit greatly from this particularly instructive, thorough and clearly written exposition of density functional theory: its basis, concepts, terms, implementation, and performance in diverse applications. Users of DFT for structure, energy, and molecular property computations, as well as reaction mechanism studies, are guided to the optimum choices of the most effective methods. Well done!" Paul von Ragué Schleyer "A conspicuous hole in the computational chemist's library is nicely filled by this book, which provides a wide-ranging and pragmatic view of the subject.[...It] should justifiably become the favorite text on the subject for practioneers who aim to use DFT to solve chemical problems." J. F. Stanton, J. Am. Chem. Soc. "The authors' aim is to guide the chemist through basic theoretical and related technical aspects of DFT at an easy-to-understand theoretical level. They succeed admirably." P. C. H. Mitchell, Appl. Organomet. Chem. "The authors have done an excellent service to the chemical community. [...] A Chemist's Guide to Density Functional Theory is exactly what the title suggests. It should be an invaluable source of insight and knowledge for many chemists using DFT approaches to solve chemical problems." M. Kaupp, Angew. Chem.
with contributions by numerous experts
It is difficult to overestimate the impact that density functional theory has had on computational quantum chemistry over the last two decades. Indeed, this period has seen it grow from little more than a theoreticalcuriosity to become a central tool in the computational chemist s armoury. Arguably no area of ch- istry has benefited more from the meteoric rise in density functional theory than inorganic chemistry. the ability to obtainreliable results in feasible ti- scales on systems containing heavy elements such as the d and f transition - tals has led to an enormous growth in computational inorganic chemistry. The inorganic chemical literature reflects this growth; it is almost impossible to open a modern inorganic chemistry journal without finding several papers devoted exclusively or in part to density functional theory calculations. The real imp- tance of the rise in density functional theory in inorganic chemistry is undou- edly the much closer synergy between theory and experiment than was p- viously posible. In these volumes, world-leading researchers describe recent developments in the density functional theory and its applications in modern inorganic and b- inorganic chemistry. These articles address key issues key issues in both sol- state and molecular inorganic chemistry, such as spectroscopy, mechanisms, catalysis, bonding and magnetism. The articles in volume I are more focussed on advances in density functional methodogy, while those in Volume II deal more with applications, although this is by no means a rigid distinction.
T. Koritsanszky, A. Volkov, M. Chodkiewicz: New Directions in Pseudoatom-Based X-Ray Charge Density Analysis.- B. Dittrich, D. Jayatilaka: Reliable Measurements of Dipole Moments from Single-Crystal Diffraction Data and Assessment of an In-Crystal Enhancement.- B. Engels, Th. C. Schmidt, C. Gatti, T. Schirmeister, R.F. Fink: Challenging Problems in Charge Density Determination: Polar Bonds and Influence of the Environment.- S. Fux, M. Reiher: Electron Density in Quantum Theory.- K. Meindl, J.Henn: Residual Density Analysis.- C. Gatti: The Source Function Descriptor as a Tool to Extract Chemical Information from Theoretical and Experimental Electron Densities.
Volume II presents the latest advances in catalytic hydrodeoxygenation and other transformations of some cellulosic platform chemicals to high value-added products. It presents the theoretical evaluation of the energetics and catalytic species involved in potential pathways of catalyzed carbohydrate conversion, pathways leading to the formation of humin-based by-products, and thermal pathways in deriving chemicals from lignin pyrolysis and hydrodeoxygenation. Catalytic gasification of biomass under extreme thermal conditions as an extension of pyrolysis is also discussed. Marcel Schlaf, PhD, is a Professor at the Department of Chemistry, University of Guelph, Canada. Z. Conrad Zhang, PhD, is a Professor at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
The present volume is the second in a two-volume set dealing with modelling and numerical simulations in electrochemistry. Emphasis is placed on the aspect of nanoelectrochemical issues. It seems appropriate at this juncture to mention the n- growing body of opinion in some circles that George Box was right when he stated, three decades ago, that “All models are wrong, but some are useful”. Actually, when the statement itself was made it would have been more appropriate to say that “All models are inaccurate but most are useful nonetheless”. At present, however, the statement, as it was made, is far more appropriate and closer to the facts than ever before. Currently, we are in the midst of the age of massively abundant data. Today’s philosophy seems to be that we do not need to know why one piece of information is better than another except through the statistics of incoming and outgoing links between information and this is good enough. It is why, both in principle and in practice, one can translate between two languages, without knowledge of either. While none of this can be ignored, and it may even be true that “All models are wrong and increasingly you can succeed without them” the traditional approach of scienti?c modelling is still the order of the day. That approach may be stated as hypothesize – measure – model – test. It is in this light that the present volume should be viewed.
This book gives an extensive description of the state-of-the-art in research on excited-state hydrogen bonding and hydrogen transfer in recent years. Initial chapters present both the experimental and theoretical investigations on the excited-state hydrogen bonding structures and dynamics of many organic and biological chromophores. Following this, several chapters describe the influences of the excited-state hydrogen bonding on various photophysical processes and photochemical reactions, for example: hydrogen bonding effects on fluorescence emission behaviors and photoisomerization; the role of hydrogen bonding in photosynthetic water splitting; photoinduced electron transfer and solvation dynamics in room temperature ionic liquids; and hydrogen bonding barrier crossing dynamics at bio-mimicking surfaces. Finally, the book examines experimental and theoretical studies on the nature and control of excited-state hydrogen transfer in various systems. Hydrogen Bonding and Transfer in the Excited State is an essential overview of this increasingly important field of study, surveying the entire field over 2 volumes, 40 chapters and 1200 pages. It will find a place on the bookshelves of researchers in photochemistry, photobiology, photophysics, physical chemistry and chemical physics.

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