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A new dance is devised on the Isle of Skye in the eighteenth century. An exhilarating dance. A dance, one visitor reports, that 'the emigration from Skye has occasioned'. The visitor asks for the dance's name. 'They call it America,' he is told. Now James Hunter, one of Scotland's leading historians, provides the first comprehensive account of what happened to the thousands of people who, over the last 300 years, left Skye and other parts of the Scottish Highlands to make new lives in the United States and Canada. The product both of painstaking research and extensive travels in North America, this is the definitive story of the Highland impact on the New World, the story of how soldiers, explorers, guerrilla fighters, fur traders, lumberjacks and pioneer settlers from the north of Scotland found, on the other side of the Atlantic, freedoms and opportunities denied to them at home.
The character of Canada has always been defined by the successive waves of immigrants that have peopled its vastness, beginning with the six thousand French immigrants who came to settle New France in the latter half of the seventeenth century, and continuing through the present day. Migration and adaptation to a new country have also been prominent themes in Canadian literature, detailed in the works of such authors as Susanna Moodie and Robert Service. In this collection of essays, nineteen Canadianists take a new look at immigration and migration, and how it has affected the development of the country. Drawn from a number of papers presented at the 1998 conference on migration hosted by the Centre of Canadian Studies at the University of Edinburgh, the essays address various aspects of migration in Canada. They range from topics in the eighteenth century to the 1990s, and cover a range of disciplines including geography, economics, sociology, literature, and music. All the essays demonstrate how important immigration and ties to other parts of the world are to Canadians and to the Canadian identity, and how migration is a key issue in Canada's social, economic, political, and cultural life. By addressing aspects of the migration experience – from refugee policy to migration songs – the contributors to this collection have added greater depth and clarity to our understanding of the Canadian identity.
In 1876, they wipe out General George A. Custer and his 7th Cavalry at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Chief Sitting Bull and his Sioux people then flee from the United States to Canada. There, in the autumn of 1877, the Sioux are joined by the remnants of the latest Indian nation to make a stand against the US Army, the Nez Perce. Their survivors are led by Chief White Bird. A young man follows White Bird to Sitting Bull's camp. He is White Bird's close relative and aims to tell the story of the Nez Perce War from the Nez Perce point of view. This young man's name is Duncan McDonald. Descended from chiefs of the Nez Perce and from chiefs of Scotland's most formidable clan, Duncan's family - first as Highlanders, then as Native Americans - have twice been victims of massacre and dispossession. Written with the help of Duncan McDonald's present-day kinsfolk on the Flathead Indian Reservation in Western Montana, this real-life family saga spans two continents and more than thirty generations to link Scotland's clans with the native peoples of the American West.
Why do the United States and Canada have such divergent political cultures when they share one of the closest economic and cultural relationships in the world? Kaufman examines the North American political landscape to draw out the essential historical factors that underlie the countries differences."
In nineteenth century paintings, the proud Indian warrior and the Scottish Highland chief appear in similar ways--colorful and wild, righteous and warlike, the last of their kind. Earlier accounts depict both as barbarians, lacking in culture and in need of civilization. By the nineteenth century, intermarriage and cultural contact between the two--described during the Seven Years' War as cousins--was such that Cree, Mohawk, Cherokee, and Salish were often spoken with Gaelic accents. In this imaginative work of imperial and tribal history, Colin Calloway examines why these two seemingly wildly disparate groups appear to have so much in common. Both Highland clans and Native American societies underwent parallel experiences on the peripheries of Britain's empire, and often encountered one another on the frontier. Indeed, Highlanders and American Indians fought, traded, and lived together. Both groups were treated as tribal peoples--remnants of a barbaric past--and eventually forced from their ancestral lands as their traditional food sources--cattle in the Highlands and bison on the Great Plains--were decimated to make way for livestock farming. In a familiar pattern, the cultures that conquered them would later romanticize the very ways of life they had destroyed. White People, Indians, and Highlanders illustrates how these groups alternately resisted and accommodated the cultural and economic assault of colonialism, before their eventual dispossession during the Highland Clearances and Indian Removals. What emerges is a finely-drawn portrait of how indigenous peoples with their own rich identities experienced cultural change, economic transformation, and demographic dislocation amidst the growing power of the British and American empires.
Explores how the Scottish heritage and folklore thrives and blends with Southern regional myths and culture, and how that creates a unique sense of identity for Scottish Americans.
This book examines the role of the Scots in the development of Canadian sport. The evidence from the wide range of primary and secondary sources cited by the author proves that the Scottish contribution was significant.

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