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The book assumes next to no prior knowledge of the topic. The first part introduces the core mathematics, always in conjunction with the physical context. In the second part of the book, a series of examples showcases some of the more conceptually advanced areas of physics, the presentation of which draws on the developments in the first part. A large number of problems helps students to hone their skills in using the presented mathematical methods. Solutions to the problems are available to instructors on an associated password-protected website for lecturers.
This book provides an introduction to the mathematics of modern physics, presenting concepts and techniques in mathematical physics at a level suitable for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students. It aims to introduce the reader to modern mathematical thinking within a physics setting. Topics covered include tensor algebra, differential geometry, topology, Lie groups and Lie algebras, distribution theory, fundamental analysis and Hilbert spaces. The book includes exercises and worked examples, to test the students' understanding of the various concepts, as well as extending the themes covered in the main text.
Based on the author’s junior-level undergraduate course, this introductory textbook is designed for a course in mathematical physics. Focusing on the physics of oscillations and waves, A Course in Mathematical Methods for Physicists helps students understand the mathematical techniques needed for their future studies in physics. It takes a bottom-up approach that emphasizes physical applications of the mathematics. The book offers: A quick review of mathematical prerequisites, proceeding to applications of differential equations and linear algebra Classroom-tested explanations of complex and Fourier analysis for trigonometric and special functions Coverage of vector analysis and curvilinear coordinates for solving higher dimensional problems Sections on nonlinear dynamics, variational calculus, numerical solutions of differential equations, and Green's functions
A comprehensive survey of all the mathematical methods that should be available to graduate students in physics. In addition to the usual topics of analysis, such as infinite series, functions of a complex variable and some differential equations as well as linear vector spaces, this book includes a more extensive discussion of group theory than can be found in other current textbooks. The main feature of this textbook is its extensive treatment of geometrical methods as applied to physics. With its introduction of differentiable manifolds and a discussion of vectors and forms on such manifolds as part of a first-year graduate course in mathematical methods, the text allows students to grasp at an early stage the contemporary literature on dynamical systems, solitons and related topological solutions to field equations, gauge theories, gravitational theory, and even string theory. Free solutions manual available for lecturers at www.wiley-vch.de/supplements/.
Clarity, readability and rigor combine in the second edition of this widely-used textbook to provide the first step into general relativity for undergraduate students with a minimal background in mathematics. Topics within relativity that fascinate astrophysical researchers and students alike are covered with Schutz's characteristic ease and authority - from black holes to gravitational lenses, from pulsars to the study of the Universe as a whole. This edition now contains discoveries by astronomers that require general relativity for their explanation; a revised chapter on relativistic stars, including new information on pulsars; an entirely rewritten chapter on cosmology; and an extended, comprehensive treatment of modern detectors and expected sources. Over 300 exercises, many new to this edition, give students the confidence to work with general relativity and the necessary mathematics, whilst the informal writing style makes the subject matter easily accessible. Password protected solutions for instructors are available at www.cambridge.org/9780521887052.
In the past decade the language and methods ofmodern differential geometry have been increasingly used in theoretical physics. What seemed extravagant when this book first appeared 12 years ago, as lecture notes, is now a commonplace. This fact has strengthened my belief that today students of theoretical physics have to learn that language-and the sooner the better. Afterall, they willbe the professors ofthe twenty-first century and it would be absurd if they were to teach then the mathematics of the nineteenth century. Thus for this new edition I did not change the mathematical language. Apart from correcting some mistakes I have only added a section on gauge theories. In the last decade it has become evident that these theories describe fundamental interactions, and on the classical level their structure is suffi cientlyclear to qualify them for the minimum amount ofknowledge required by a theoretician. It is with much regret that I had to refrain from in corporating the interesting developments in Kaluza-Klein theories and in cosmology, but I felt bound to my promise not to burden the students with theoretical speculations for which there is no experimental evidence. I am indebted to many people for suggestions concerning this volume. In particular, P. Aichelburg, H. Rumpf and H. Urbantke have contributed generously to corrections and improvements. Finally, I would like to thank Dr. 1. Dahl-Jensen for redoing some of the figures on the computer.

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