Download Free A Modern History Of Japan From Tokugawa Times To The Present Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online A Modern History Of Japan From Tokugawa Times To The Present and write the review.

A Modern History of Japan takes students from the days of the shogunate to the aftermath of the 2008 tsunami. This third edition incorporates increased coverage of both Japan's role within East Asia - particularly with China, Korea, and Manchuria - as well as expanded discussions of culturaland intellectual history.
The bestselling textbook on Modern Japan, extensively revised to cover Japan's tumultuous recent history, including the events of 3-11.
The Seventh Edition of COMPARATIVE POLITICS IN TRANSITION combines a thematic framework with a country-by-country approach to provide a thoughtful and effective introduction to Comparative Politics that is appropriate for students new to the study of political science. The author uses an arenas classification to organize and frame the systematic comparative analysis, rather than the traditional three worlds framework. This classification more accurately reflects the contemporary political, economic, and social realities of different political systems, allowing the author to provide historical, theoretical, and conceptual background through ten in-text country case studies. Unlike most other comparative politics texts, McCormick provides a balanced study of the Western and non-Western world and explores the politics and government of Islam and of failed states. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Language students learn best when given the opportunity to communicate meaningful content in realistic settings. Providing those realistic contexts hasn't always been easy, but as this book emphatically demonstrates technology can help. Current Internet- and software-based technologies offer authentic, individualized interactions with members of the target language community - precisely the kind of interaction that leads to the biggest gains in proficiency. Months' worth of lesson plans and activities show you how to use the best of these technology tools to build content-based curricula for all ages and languages, and simultaneously address critical technology and content area standards. FEATURES Dozens of lesson plans on CD-ROM that can be used as stand-alone activities or month-long curriculum plans Introductory essays on technology integration and foreign language standards, performance assessment, and distance learning Interdisciplinary links, teaching tips, lesson extenders, and assessment rubrics for each unit Also available: Teachers as Technology Leaders: A Guide to ISTE Technology Facilitation and Technology Leadership Accreditation - ISBN 1564842266 Transforming Classroom Practice: Professional Development Strategies in Educational Technology - ISBN 1564842460
Through a cross-cultural and multi-disciplinary approach, this introductory textbook focuses on critical issues of development, environment, and cultural conflicts facing most area of the non-Western world. Areas covered include China, Japan, Southeast Asia, the Indian subcontinent, the Middle East, and sub-Saharan Africa.
Dennis Washburn traces the changing character of Japanese national identity in the works of six major authors: Ueda Akinari, Natsume S?seki, Mori ?gai, Yokomitsu Riichi, ?oka Shohei, and Mishima Yukio. By focusing on certain interconnected themes, Washburn illuminates the contradictory desires of a nation trapped between emulating the West and preserving the traditions of Asia. Washburn begins with Ueda's Ugetsu monogatari (Tales of Moonlight and Rain) and its preoccupation with the distant past, a sense of loss, and the connection between values and identity. He then considers the use of narrative realism and the metaphor of translation in Soseki's Sanshiro; the relationship between ideology and selfhood in Ogai's Seinen; Yokomitsu Riichi's attempt to synthesize the national and the cosmopolitan; Ooka Shohei's post-World War II representations of the ethical and spiritual crises confronting his age; and Mishima's innovative play with the aesthetics of the inauthentic and the artistry of kitsch. Washburn's brilliant analysis teases out common themes concerning the illustration of moral and aesthetic values, the crucial role of autonomy and authenticity in defining notions of culture, the impact of cultural translation on ideas of nation and subjectivity, the ethics of identity, and the hybrid quality of modern Japanese society. He pinpoints the persistent anxiety that influenced these authors' writings, a struggle to translate rhetorical forms of Western literature while preserving elements of the pre-Meiji tradition. A unique combination of intellectual history and critical literary analysis, Translating Mount Fuji recounts the evolution of a conflict that inspired remarkable literary experimentation and achievement.
Grassroots Fascism profiles the Asia Pacific War (1937–1945)—the most important though least understood experience of Japan's modern history—through the lens of ordinary Japanese life. Moving deftly from the struggles of the home front to the occupied territories to the ravages of the front line, the book offers rare insights into popular experiences from the war's troubled beginnings through Japan's disastrous defeat in 1945 and the new beginning it heralded. Yoshimi Yoshiaki mobilizes diaries, letters, memoirs, and government documents to portray the ambivalent position of ordinary Japanese as both wartime victims and active participants. He also provides penetrating accounts of the war experiences of Japan's minorities and imperial subjects, including Koreans and Taiwanese. His book challenges the idea that the Japanese people operated as a mere conduit for the military during the war, passively accepting an imperial ideology imposed upon them by the political elite. Viewed from the bottom up, wartime Japan unfolds as a complex modern mass society, with a corresponding variety of popular roles and agendas. In chronicling the diversity of wartime Japanese social experience, Yoshimi's account elevates our understanding of "Japanese Fascism." In its relation of World War II to the evolution—and destruction—of empire, it makes a fresh contribution to the global history of the war. Ethan Mark's translation supplements the Japanese original with explanatory notes and an in-depth introduction that situates the work within Japanese studies and global history.

Best Books