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For too long, argues Richard Harvey Brown, social scientists have felt forced to choose between imitating science's empirical methodology and impersonating a romantic notion of art, the methods of which are seen as primarily a matter of intuition, interpretation, and opinion. Developing the idea of a "cognitive aesthetic," Brown shows how both science and art—as well as the human studies that stand between them—depend on metaphoric thinking as their "logic of discovery" and may be assessed in terms of such aesthetic criteria of adequacy as economy, elegance, originality, scope, congruence, and form. By recognizing this "aesthetic" common ground between science and art, Brown demonstrates that a fusion can be achieved within the human sciences of these two principal ideals of knowledge—the scientific or positivist one and the artistic or intuitive one. A path, then, is opened for creating a knowledge of ourselves and society which is at once objective and subjective, at once valid scientifically and significantly humane.
This sweeping inquiry into the present condition of the human sciences addresses the central questions: What sort of knowledge do the human sciences claim to be offering? To what extent can that knowledge be called scientific? and What do we mean by "scientific" in such a context? In this wide-ranging book, one of the most esteemed cultural historians of our time turns his attention to major questions about human experience and various attempts to understand it "scientifically." Mazlish considers the achievements, failings, and possibilities of the human sciences--a domain that he broadly defines to include the social sciences, literature, psychology, and hermeneutic studies. In a rich and original synthesis built upon the work of earlier philosophers and historians, Mazlish constructs a new view of the nature and meaning of the human sciences. Starting with the remote human past and moving through the Age of Discovery to the present day, Mazlish discusses the sort of knowledge the human sciences claim to offer. He looks closely at the positivistic aspirations of the human sciences, which are modeled after the natural sciences, and at their interpretive tendencies. In an analysis of scientific method and scientific community, he explores the roles they can or should assume in the human sciences. His approach is genuinely interdisciplinary, drawing upon an array of topics, from civil society to globalization to the interactions of humans and machines.
Narratives in Social Science Research introduces students to the use of narrative methodology as a research tool. It offers a rigorous framework for the application of these devices within qualitative research. The book provides: - An historical overview of the development of the narrative approach within the social sciences - A guide to how narrative methods can be applied in fieldwork - An explanation of how to incorporate a narrative approach within a research project - Guidelines for interpreting collected or produced narratives - A student-focused approach - key arguments and methods are illustrated by case-studies and lists of further reading. Written in an accessible and engaging manner, this detailed text will be a useful resource for researchers and students taking courses in qualitative research across a variety of social disciplines.
The first volume of a two-volume intellectual biography of Auguste Comte, the founder of modern sociology and positivism.
Uprooting has to do with one of the fundamental properties of human life-the need to change-and with the personal and societal mecha nisms for dealing with that need. As with the more general problems of change, uprooting can be a time of human disaster and desolation, or a time of adaptation and growth into new capacities. The special quality of uprooting is that the need to change is faced at a time of separation from accustomed social, cultural, and environ mental support systems. It is this separation from familiar supports that either renders the uprooted vulnerable to the destructive conse quences of change, or creates freedoms for their evolution into new and constructive patterns of life. Whether the outcomes will be destruc tive or constructive will be determined by the forces at work: the nature and power of the uprooting forces versus the personal and societal capacities for coping with them. Uprooting events are so widespread as to be compared with the major rites of life, but with the difference that dislocation is involved. Uprooting reaches from self-imposed movements such as rural-to urban migration, running away, and traveling abroad for schooling, to natural and man-made disasters such as earthquakes, political oppres sion, and war. The impacts vary from the need to adapt to. a new culture for an interim period of study to the desolating consequences of the total loss of family, friends, home, and country.
A call for new methods for anthropology, this book explores the nature of anthropological knowledge and the conditions of integration and communication with people. Starting with an analysis of anthropologists' guilt, Fan addresses issues of reflexivity, reciprocity, and respect, then builds on this to evaluate how researchers generate knowledge.

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