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Designed for an undergraduate course or for independent study, this text presents sophisticated mathematical ideas in an elementary and friendly fashion. The fundamental purpose of this book is to engage the reader and to teach a real understanding of mathematical thinking while conveying the beauty and elegance of mathematics. The text focuses on teaching the understanding of mathematical proofs. The material covered has applications both to mathematics and to other subjects. The book contains a large number of exercises of varying difficulty, designed to help reinforce basic concepts and to motivate and challenge the reader. The sole prerequisite for understanding the text is basic high school algebra; some trigonometry is needed for Chapters 9 and 12. Topics covered include: mathematical induction - modular arithmetic - the fundamental theorem of arithmetic - Fermat's little theorem - RSA encryption - the Euclidean algorithm -rational and irrational numbers - complex numbers - cardinality - Euclidean plane geometry - constructability (including a proof that an angle of 60 degrees cannot be trisected with a straightedge and compass). This textbook is suitable for a wide variety of courses and for a broad range of students in the fields of education, liberal arts, physical sciences and mathematics. Students at the senior high school level who like mathematics will also be able to further their understanding of mathematical thinking by reading this book.
Designed for an undergraduate course or for independent study, this text presents sophisticated mathematical ideas in an elementary and friendly fashion. The fundamental purpose of this book is to engage the reader and to teach a real understanding of mathematical thinking while conveying the beauty and elegance of mathematics. The text focuses on teaching the understanding of mathematical proofs. The material covered has applications both to mathematics and to other subjects. The book contains a large number of exercises of varying difficulty, designed to help reinforce basic concepts and to motivate and challenge the reader. The sole prerequisite for understanding the text is basic high school algebra; some trigonometry is needed for Chapters 9 and 12. Topics covered include: mathematical induction - modular arithmetic - the fundamental theorem of arithmetic - Fermat's little theorem - RSA encryption - the Euclidean algorithm -rational and irrational numbers - complex numbers - cardinality - Euclidean plane geometry - constructability (including a proof that an angle of 60 degrees cannot be trisected with a straightedge and compass). This textbook is suitable for a wide variety of courses and for a broad range of students in the fields of education, liberal arts, physical sciences and mathematics. Students at the senior high school level who like mathematics will also be able to further their understanding of mathematical thinking by reading this book.
Designed for an undergraduate course or for independent study, this text presents sophisticated mathematical ideas in an elementary and friendly fashion. The fundamental purpose of this book is to teach mathematical thinking while conveying the beauty and elegance of mathematics. The book contains a large number of exercises of varying difficulty, some of which are designed to help to reinforce basic concepts and others of which will challenge virtually all readers. The sole prerequisite for reading this text is basic high school algebra. Topics covered include: * mathematical induction * modular arithmetic * the Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic * Fermat's Little Theorem * RSA encryption * the Euclidean algorithm * rational and irrational numbers * complex numbers * cardinality * Euclidean plane geometry * constructibility (including a proof that an angle of 60 degrees cannot be trisected with a straightedge and compass)* infinite series * higher dimensional spaces. This textbook is suitable for a wide variety of courses and for a broad range of students of mathematics and other subjects. Mathematically inclined senior high school students will also be able to read this book.
Solutions of equations in integers is the central problem of number theory and is the focus of this book. The amount of material is suitable for a one-semester course. The author has tried to avoid the ad hoc proofs in favor of unifying ideas that work in many situations. There are exercises at the end of almost every section, so that each new idea or proof receives immediate reinforcement.
Spaces is a modern introduction to real analysis at the advanced undergraduate level. It is forward-looking in the sense that it first and foremost aims to provide students with the concepts and techniques they need in order to follow more advanced courses in mathematical analysis and neighboring fields. The only prerequisites are a solid understanding of calculus and linear algebra. Two introductory chapters will help students with the transition from computation-based calculus to theory-based analysis. The main topics covered are metric spaces, spaces of continuous functions, normed spaces, differentiation in normed spaces, measure and integration theory, and Fourier series. Although some of the topics are more advanced than what is usually found in books of this level, care is taken to present the material in a way that is suitable for the intended audience: concepts are carefully introduced and motivated, and proofs are presented in full detail. Applications to differential equations and Fourier analysis are used to illustrate the power of the theory, and exercises of all levels from routine to real challenges help students develop their skills and understanding. The text has been tested in classes at the University of Oslo over a number of years.
Based on an honors course taught by the author at UC Berkeley, this introduction to undergraduate real analysis gives a different emphasis by stressing the importance of pictures and hard problems. Topics include: a natural construction of the real numbers, four-dimensional visualization, basic point-set topology, function spaces, multivariable calculus via differential forms (leading to a simple proof of the Brouwer Fixed Point Theorem), and a pictorial treatment of Lebesgue theory. Over 150 detailed illustrations elucidate abstract concepts and salient points in proofs. The exposition is informal and relaxed, with many helpful asides, examples, some jokes, and occasional comments from mathematicians, such as Littlewood, Dieudonné, and Osserman. This book thus succeeds in being more comprehensive, more comprehensible, and more enjoyable, than standard introductions to analysis. New to the second edition of Real Mathematical Analysis is a presentation of Lebesgue integration done almost entirely using the undergraph approach of Burkill. Payoffs include: concise picture proofs of the Monotone and Dominated Convergence Theorems, a one-line/one-picture proof of Fubini's theorem from Cavalieri’s Principle, and, in many cases, the ability to see an integral result from measure theory. The presentation includes Vitali’s Covering Lemma, density points — which are rarely treated in books at this level — and the almost everywhere differentiability of monotone functions. Several new exercises now join a collection of over 500 exercises that pose interesting challenges and introduce special topics to the student keen on mastering this beautiful subject.
This lively introductory text exposes the student to the rewards of a rigorous study of functions of a real variable. In each chapter, informal discussions of questions that give analysis its inherent fascination are followed by precise, but not overly formal, developments of the techniques needed to make sense of them. By focusing on the unifying themes of approximation and the resolution of paradoxes that arise in the transition from the finite to the infinite, the text turns what could be a daunting cascade of definitions and theorems into a coherent and engaging progression of ideas. Acutely aware of the need for rigor, the student is much better prepared to understand what constitutes a proper mathematical proof and how to write one. Fifteen years of classroom experience with the first edition of Understanding Analysis have solidified and refined the central narrative of the second edition. Roughly 150 new exercises join a selection of the best exercises from the first edition, and three more project-style sections have been added. Investigations of Euler’s computation of ζ(2), the Weierstrass Approximation Theorem, and the gamma function are now among the book’s cohort of seminal results serving as motivation and payoff for the beginning student to master the methods of analysis.

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