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Algebra: Chapter 0 is a self-contained introduction to the main topics of algebra, suitable for a first sequence on the subject at the beginning graduate or upper undergraduate level. The primary distinguishing feature of the book, compared to standard textbooks in algebra, is the early introduction of categories, used as a unifying theme in the presentation of the main topics. A second feature consists of an emphasis on homological algebra: basic notions on complexes are presented as soon as modules have been introduced, and an extensive last chapter on homological algebra can form the basis for a follow-up introductory course on the subject. Approximately 1,000 exercises both provide adequate practice to consolidate the understanding of the main body of the text and offer the opportunity to explore many other topics, including applications to number theory and algebraic geometry. This will allow instructors to adapt the textbook to their specific choice of topics and provide the independent reader with a richer exposure to algebra. Many exercises include substantial hints, and navigation of the topics is facilitated by an extensive index and by hundreds of cross-references.
This book provides the essential foundations of both linear and nonlinear analysis necessary for understanding and working in twenty-first century applied and computational mathematics. In addition to the standard topics, this text includes several key concepts of modern applied mathematical analysis that should be, but are not typically, included in advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate mathematics curricula. This material is the introductory foundation upon which algorithm analysis, optimization, probability, statistics, differential equations, machine learning, and control theory are built. When used in concert with the free supplemental lab materials, this text teaches students both the theory and the computational practice of modern mathematical analysis. Foundations of Applied Mathematics, Volume 1: Mathematical Analysis includes several key topics not usually treated in courses at this level, such as uniform contraction mappings, the continuous linear extension theorem, Daniell–Lebesgue integration, resolvents, spectral resolution theory, and pseudospectra. Ideas are developed in a mathematically rigorous way and students are provided with powerful tools and beautiful ideas that yield a number of nice proofs, all of which contribute to a deep understanding of advanced analysis and linear algebra. Carefully thought out exercises and examples are built on each other to reinforce and retain concepts and ideas and to achieve greater depth. Associated lab materials are available that expose students to applications and numerical computation and reinforce the theoretical ideas taught in the text. The text and labs combine to make students technically proficient and to answer the age-old question, "When am I going to use this?
``Classical groups'', named so by Hermann Weyl, are groups of matrices or quotients of matrix groups by small normal subgroups. Thus the story begins, as Weyl suggested, with ``Her All-embracing Majesty'', the general linear group $GL_n(V)$ of all invertible linear transformations of a vector space $V$ over a field $F$. All further groups discussed are either subgroups of $GL_n(V)$ or closely related quotient groups. Most of the classical groups consist of invertible linear transformations that respect a bilinear form having some geometric significance, e.g., a quadratic form, a symplectic form, etc. Accordingly, the author develops the required geometric notions, albeit from an algebraic point of view, as the end results should apply to vector spaces over more-or-less arbitrary fields, finite or infinite. The classical groups have proved to be important in a wide variety of venues, ranging from physics to geometry and far beyond. In recent years, they have played a prominent role in the classification of the finite simple groups. This text provides a single source for the basic facts about the classical groups and also includes the required geometrical background information from the first principles. It is intended for graduate students who have completed standard courses in linear algebra and abstract algebra. The author, L. C. Grove, is a well-known expert who has published extensively in the subject area.
This book is an expanded text for a graduate course in commutative algebra, focusing on the algebraic underpinnings of algebraic geometry and of number theory. Accordingly, the theory of affine algebras is featured, treated both directly and via the theory of Noetherian and Artinian modules, and the theory of graded algebras is included to provide the foundation for projective varieties. Major topics include the theory of modules over a principal ideal domain, and its applicationsto matrix theory (including the Jordan decomposition), the Galois theory of field extensions, transcendence degree, the prime spectrum of an algebra, localization, and the classical theory of Noetherian and Artinian rings. Later chapters include some algebraic theory of elliptic curves (featuring theMordell-Weil theorem) and valuation theory, including local fields. One feature of the book is an extension of the text through a series of appendices. This permits the inclusion of more advanced material, such as transcendental field extensions, the discriminant and resultant, the theory of Dedekind domains, and basic theorems of rings of algebraic integers. An extended appendix on derivations includes the Jacobian conjecture and Makar-Limanov's theory of locally nilpotent derivations. Grobnerbases can be found in another appendix. Exercises provide a further extension of the text. The book can be used both as a textbook and as a reference source.
This textbook is addressed to graduate students in mathematics or other disciplines who wish to understand the essential concepts of functional analysis and their applications to partial differential equations. The book is intentionally concise, presenting all the fundamental concepts and results but omitting the more specialized topics. Enough of the theory of Sobolev spaces and semigroups of linear operators is included as needed to develop significant applications to elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic PDEs. Throughout the book, care has been taken to explain the connections between theorems in functional analysis and familiar results of finite-dimensional linear algebra. The main concepts and ideas used in the proofs are illustrated with a large number of figures. A rich collection of homework problems is included at the end of most chapters. The book is suitable as a text for a one-semester graduate course.
Linear algebra permeates mathematics, perhaps more so than any other single subject. It plays an essential role in pure and applied mathematics, statistics, computer science, and many aspects of physics and engineering. This book conveys in a user-friendly way the basic and advanced techniques of linear algebra from the point of view of a working analyst. The techniques are illustrated by a wide sample of applications and examples that are chosen to highlight the tools of the trade. In short, this is material that many of us wish we had been taught as graduate students. Roughly the first third of the book covers the basic material of a first course in linear algebra. The remaining chapters are devoted to applications drawn from vector calculus, numerical analysis, control theory, complex analysis, convexity and functional analysis. In particular, fixed point theorems, extremal problems, matrix equations, zero location and eigenvalue location problems, and matrices with nonnegative entries are discussed. Appendices on useful facts from analysis and supplementary information from complex function theory are also provided for the convenience of the reader. In this new edition, most of the chapters in the first edition have been revised, some extensively. The revisions include changes in a number of proofs, either to simplify the argument, to make the logic clearer or, on occasion, to sharpen the result. New introductory sections on linear programming, extreme points for polyhedra and a Nevanlinna-Pick interpolation problem have been added, as have some very short introductory sections on the mathematics behind Google, Drazin inverses, band inverses and applications of SVD together with a number of new exercises.
This book is the second part of the new edition of Advanced Modern Algebra (the first part published as Graduate Studies in Mathematics, Volume 165). Compared to the previous edition, the material has been significantly reorganized and many sections have been rewritten. The book presents many topics mentioned in the first part in greater depth and in more detail. The five chapters of the book are devoted to group theory, representation theory, homological algebra, categories, and commutative algebra, respectively. The book can be used as a text for a second abstract algebra graduate course, as a source of additional material to a first abstract algebra graduate course, or for self-study.

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