Download Free Among Wolves Gordon Haber S Insights Into Alaska S Most Misunderstood Animal Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Among Wolves Gordon Haber S Insights Into Alaska S Most Misunderstood Animal and write the review.

Alaska’s wolves lost their fiercest advocate, Gordon Haber, when his research plane crashed in Denali National Park in 2009. Passionate, tenacious, and occasionally brash, Haber, a former hockey player and park ranger, devoted his life to Denali’s wolves. He weathered brutal temperatures in the wild to document the wolves and provided exceptional insights into wolf behavior. Haber’s writings and photographs reveal an astonishing degree of cooperation between wolf family members as they hunt, raise pups, and play, social behaviors and traditions previously unknown. With the wolves at risk of being destroyed by hunting and trapping, his studies advocated for a balanced approach to wolf management. His fieldwork registered as one of the longest studies in wildlife science and had a lasting impact on wolf policies. Haber’s field notes, his extensive journals, and stories from friends all come together in Among Wolves to reveal much about both the wolves he studied and the researcher himself. Wolves continue to fascinate and polarize people, and Haber’s work continues to resonate.
Red wolves are shy, elusive, and misunderstood predators. Until the 1800s, they were common in the longleaf pine savannas and deciduous forests of the southeastern United States. However, habitat degradation, persecution, and interbreeding with the coyote nearly annihilated them. Today, reintroduced red wolves are found only in peninsular northeastern North Carolina within less than 1 percent of their former range. In The Secret World of Red Wolves, nature writer T. DeLene Beeland shadows the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's pioneering recovery program over the course of a year to craft an intimate portrait of the red wolf, its history, and its restoration. Her engaging exploration of this top-level predator traces the intense effort of conservation personnel to save a species that has slipped to the verge of extinction. Beeland weaves together the voices of scientists, conservationists, and local landowners while posing larger questions about human coexistence with red wolves, our understanding of what defines this animal as a distinct species, and how climate change may swamp its current habitat.
John Morgan and his wife can barely contain their excitement upon arriving as the new teachers in a Yup'ik Eskimo village on the windswept Alaskan tundra. But their move proves disastrous when a deadly epidemic strikes and the isolated community descends into total chaos. When outside aid fails to arrive, John’s only hope lies in escaping the snow-covered tundra and the hunger of the other survivors—he must make the thousand-mile trek across the Alaskan wilderness for help. He encounters a blind Eskimo girl and an elderly woman who need his protection, and he needs their knowledge of the terrain to survive. The harsh journey pushes him beyond his limits as he discovers a new sense of hope and the possibility of loving again.
On the 15th anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill comes one woman's reflections on that devastation and the parallel disintegration of her own marriage. A beautiful evocation of both grief and hope.
This non-fiction book is about a great mountain wilderness where wolves and their prey continue to live in a delicate, natural balance. Using a combination of narrative non-fiction and easy-to-follow essays, this book explores the natural history of the Yukon during the last 20,000 years. Part 1 - History - chronicles wolf evolution since the end of the ice age, including the great collapse of Beringia large mammals and the domination by caribou through the Holocene. Other chapters include the relation between ancient native people and wolves, and the importance of Jack London's Yukon stories to our collective image of wolves as a symbol of wilderness. Other history chapters explore the relentless, but largely ineffective attempts to reduce wolves through bounties, poison and hunting through the 20th century. Part 2 - Understanding - describes the author's original research into wolf relations to moose, caribou, Dall's sheep, ravens, and grizzly bears. In the last chapter Hayes, who studied three Yukon wolf control projects, explains why broad-scale killing of wolves has only produced brief benefits for moose and caribou, and why the practice should end. Finally, the book raises questions about how we should use and conserve one of the largest remaining tracts of complete wilderness on the continent.
"Lessons Jim and Jamie Dutcher learned from six years of living in the Idaho wilderness with gray wolves"--
»Global« is everywhere - recent years have seen a significant proliferation of the adjective »global« across discourses. But what do social actors actually do when using this term? Written from within the political studies and International Relations disciplines, and with a particular interest in the US, this book demonstrates that the widespread use of »global« is more than a linguistic curiosity. It constitutes a distinct political phenomenon of major importance: the negotiation and reproduction of the »new world«. As such, the analysis of the use of »global« provides fascinating insights into an influential and politically loaded aspect of contemporary imaginations of the world.

Best Books

DMCA - Contact