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Our knowledge comes primarily from experience – what our senses tell us. But is experience really what it seems? The experimental breakthroughs in 17th-century science of Kepler, Galileo and Newton informed the great British empiricist tradition, which accepts a ‘common-sense’ view of the world – and yet concludes that all we can ever know are ‘ideas’. Dave Robinson, with the aid of Bill Mayblin’s brilliant illustrations, outlines the arguments of Locke, Berkeley, Hume, J.S. Mill, Bertrand Russell and the last British empiricist, A.J. Ayer. They also explore criticisms of empiricism in the work of Kant, Wittgenstein, Karl Popper and others, providing a unique overview of this compelling area of philosophy.
Gold! - his own gold - brought back to him as mysteriously as it had been taken away! Falsely accused of theft, Silas Marner is cut off from his community but finds refuge in the village of Raveloe, where he is eyed with distant suspicion. Like a spider from a fairy-tale, Silas fills fifteen monotonous years with weaving and accumulating gold. The son of the wealthy local Squire, Godfrey Cass also seeks an escape from his past. One snowy winter, two events change the course of their lives: Silas's gold is stolen and, a child crawls across his threshold. Combining the qualities of a fable with a rich evocation of rural life in the early years of the nineteenth century, Silas Marner (1861) is a masterpiece of construction and a powerful meditation on the value of communal bonds in a mysterious world.
For all men are persuaded by considerations of where their interest lies... Aristotle's Art of Rhetoric is the earliest systematic treatment of the subject, and it remains among the most incisive works on rhetoric that we possess. In it, we are asked: What is a good speech? What do popular audiences find persuasive? How does one compose a persuasive speech? Aristotle considers these questions in the context of the ancient Greek democratic city-state, in which large audiences of ordinary citizens listened to speeches pro and con before casting the votes that made the laws, decided the policies, and settled the cases in court. Persuasion by means of the spoken word was the vehicle for conducting politics and administering the law. After stating the basic principles of persuasive speech, Aristotle places rhetoric in relation to allied fields such as politics, ethics, psychology, and logic, and he demonstrates how to construct a persuasive case for any kind of plea on any subject of communal concern. Aristotle views persuasion flexibly, examining how speakers should devise arguments, evoke emotions, and demonstrate their own credibility. The treatise provides ample evidence of Aristotle's unique and brilliant manner of thinking, and has had a profound influence on later attempts to understand what makes speech persuasive. The new translation of the text is accompanied by an introduction discussing the political, philosophical, and rhetorical background to Aristotle's treatise, as well as the composition and transmission of the original text and an account of Aristotle's life.
The Scottish philosopher David Hume (1711-1776) is widely regarded as the greatest and most significant English-speaking philosopher and often seen as having had the most influence on the way philosophy is practiced today in the West. His reputation is based not only on the quality of his philosophical thought but also on the breadth and scope of his writings, which ranged over metaphysics, epistemology, morals, politics, religion, and aesthetics. The Handbook's 38 newly commissioned chapters are divided into six parts: Central Themes; Metaphysics and Epistemology; Passion, Morality and Politics; Aesthetics, History, and Economics; Religion; Hume and the Enlightenment; and After Hume. The volume also features an introduction from editor Paul Russell and a chapter on Hume's biography.
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...as his own" (Dowden). For the references to the poet's age.in the Sonnets, see p. 41 above. 3. Furrows. Cf. Sonn. 2 above, and Rich. III. i. 3. 229. 4. Expiate. Bring to an end. Cf. Rich. III. iii. 3. 23: "Make haste; the hour of death is expiate." Here, as there, Steevens conjectures "expirate," which White and Hudson adopt. Surely there is no need of coining a word to replace one which S. twice uses and which can be plausibly explained. Malone quotes Chapman's Byron's Conspiracie, in which an old courtier speaks of himself as " A poor and expiate humour of the court." XXIII 1. Vnperfect. Used by S. only here; but unperfectness occurs in Oth. ii. 3. 298. Imperfect we find in Sonn. 43. 11 and elsewhere, and imperfection six times in the plays. On the present passage, cf. Cor. v. 3. 40: --"Like a dull actor now, I have forgot my part, and I am out, Even to a full disgrace." 2. Besides. For the prepositional use, cf. T. N, iv. 2. 92: "Alas, sir, how fell you besides your five wits?" 3. Replete with too much rage. The rage overcoming self-control. 5. For fear of trust. Fearing to trust myself. Schmidt makes it = " doubting of being trusted;" but the context clearly confirms the explanation I have given. Dowden calls attention to the construction of the first eight lines, 5, 6 referring to 1, 2, and 7, 8, to 3. 4 6. Ceremony. Hudson says that the word "is here used as a trisyllable, as if spelt cer'mony;" but how he would scan the verse I cannot imagine. The word is clearly a quadrisyllable, as almost always in S. 9. Books. Sewell reads " looks;" but the old reading is supported by 13 below. The books, as Dowden remarks, are probably the manuscript books in which the poet writes his sonnets. 12. That tongue. Probably = any tongue, however eloquent, ...

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