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The overriding objective of this text is to help students understand the economic context in which they play out their personal and professional lives, both in the United States and in the world. It seeks to overcome the indifference of non-economics majors at the college level.
Annotation Just what is the market system? This clear and accessible book answers this question, then explains how it works and what it can and cannot do. Lindblom, writing in nontechnical language for a wide general audience, offers an evenhanded view of the market system and its prospects for the future.
If you are genuinely interested in what is wrong with modern economics, this is where you can find out. If you would like to understand the flaws in Keynesian macro, this is the book you must read. If you are interested in marginal analysis properly explained, you again need to read this book. Based on the classical principles of John Stuart Mill, it is what is missing today; a text based on explaining how an economy works from a supply-side perspective.
When we stop to consider it, a free economy is a marvel. Millions of people, mostly unknown to one another, each producing some particular good or service, somehow manage to coordinate their actions in a vast, cooperative, productive order with no one in charge. How does it work? Economics helps us understand. This book introduces the concepts on which all of economics is founded, concepts such as subjective value and gains from trade, scarcity and opportunity cost, thinking at the margin, division of labor, and comparative advantage. It then introduces the foundational theory with which we understand how market prices emerge and change to reflect changing conditions: supply and demand analysis. It also introduces the principles that underlie spontaneous economic order: market prices provide the information we need to coordinate our actions with others’ actions, while profit-and-loss feedback guides entrepreneurs as to how best to satisfy others’ wants. Private property rights and freedom of exchange give us the incentive to interact in mutually beneficial ways.
This book represents the whole array of Lindblom's thought. It examines his role as an interpreter of the policy-making process whose advocacy of incrementalism placed him under the suspicion of conservative hostility to more profound social change, as well as the author of works like Unions and Capitalism and Politics and Markets, whose critiques of existing social institutions placed him under no less suspicion of radicalism. In an introduction written expressly for this collection, Lindblom explains his two voices.

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