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Environmental Anthropology studies historic and present human-environment interactions. This volume illustrates the ways in which today's environmental anthropologists are constructing new paradigms for understanding the multiplicity of players, pressures, and ecologies in every environment, and the value of cultural knowledge of landscapes. This Handbook provides a comprehensive survey of contemporary topics in environmental anthropology and thorough discussions on the current state and prospective future of the field in seven key sections. As the contributions to this Handbook demonstrate, the subfield of environmental anthropology is responding to cultural adaptations and responses to environmental changes in multiple and complex ways. As a discipline concerned primarily with human-environment interaction, environmental anthropologists recognize that we are now working within a pressure cooker of rapid environmental damage that is forcing behavioural and often cultural changes around the world. As we see in the breadth of topics presented in this volume, these environmental challenges have inspired renewed foci on traditional topics such as food procurement, ethnobiology, and spiritual ecology; and a broad new range of subjects, such as resilience, nonhuman rights, architectural anthropology, industrialism, and education. This volume enables scholars and students quick access to both established and trending environmental anthropological explorations into theory, methodology and practice.
This book aims to substantiate the growing body of research of socio-cultural contexts in which environmental education, formal or informal, take place. Innovation in environmental education that takes local contexts into account is necessary, in terms of both recognising global and historical forces that lead to environmental degradation and social and technological changes that could potentially provide solutions to environmental problems. Today, we face some of the greatest environmental challenges in global history, including climate change, deforestation, desertification and the rapid extinction of species of plants and animals. As with many social concerns and issues, the education system is widely seen as the appropriate vehicle for wide scale social reform. Environmental education is becoming increasingly important due to a number of changes in society.
Today, we face some of the greatest environmental challenges in global history. Understanding the damage being done and the varied ethics and efforts contributing to its repair is of vital importance. This volume poses the question: What can increasing the emphasis on the environment in environmental anthropology, along with the science of its problems and the theoretical and methodological tools of anthropological practice, do to aid conservation efforts, policy initiatives, and our overall understanding of how to survive as citizens of the planet? Environmental Anthropology Today combines a range of new ethnographic work with chapters exploring key theoretical and methodological issues, and draws on disciplines such as sociology and environmental science as well as anthropology to illuminate those issues. The case studies include work on North America, Europe, India, Africa, Asia, and South America, offering the reader a stimulating and thoughtful survey of the work currently being conducted in the field.
In order to move global society towards a sustainable "ecotopia," solutions must be engaged in specific places and communities, and the authors here argue for re-orienting environmental anthropology from a problem-oriented towards a solutions-focused endeavor. Using case studies from around the world, the contributors-scholar-activists and activist-practitioners- examine the interrelationships between three prominent environmental social movements: bioregionalism, a worldview and political ecology that grounds environmental action and experience; permaculture, a design science for putting the bioregional vision into action; and ecovillages, the ever-dynamic settings for creating sustainable local cultures.
This volume presents new theoretical approaches, methodologies, subject pools, and topics in the field of environmental anthropology. Environmental anthropologists are increasingly focusing on self-reflection - not just on themselves and their impacts on environmental research, but also on the reflexive qualities of their subjects, and the extent to which these individuals are questioning their own environmental behavior. Here, contributors confront the very notion of "natural resources" in granting non-human species their subjectivity and arguing for deeper understanding of "nature," and "wilderness" beyond the label of "ecosystem services." By engaging in interdisciplinary efforts, these anthropologists present new ways for their colleagues, subjects, peers and communities to understand the causes of, and alternatives to environmental destruction. This book demonstrates that environmental anthropology has moved beyond the construction of rural, small group theory, entering into a mode of solution-based methodologies and interdisciplinary theories for understanding human-environmental interactions. It is focused on post-rural existence, health and environmental risk assessment, on the realm of alternative actions, and emphasizes the necessary steps towards preventing environmental crisis.
Developing the Global Student addresses the question of how students of higher education can emerge from their university life better equipped to dwell more effectively, ethically, and comfortably amidst the turmoils of a globalizing world. It does this from a number of theoretical perspectives, illustrating the nature of the personal and educational challenges facing the individual student and the teaching professional. The book explores the massive social changes wrought by the technologies and mobilities of globalization, particularly how present and future generations will relate to, work with and dwell alongside the global other. It outlines a range of social, psychological and intercultural perspectives on human tendencies to seek out comfort among communities of similitude, and illustrates how the experience of life in a global era requires us to transcend the limits of our own biographies and approach university education as a matter of knowledge deconstruction and identity reconstruction, rather than reproduction. This book brings these considerations directly into the daily business of higher education by drawing out the implications for practice at a number of levels. It examines: the implications of a globally interconnected world and individual biographies for the design of the curriculum; a holistic view of learning in the context of the need to develop the global self; what the impact on non-academic practice will be if universities as institutions are to enable these changes; ways in which the broader student community can transform to offer an experience which is more supportive of the development of global selves. Linking theoretical perspectives to present a model of learning as change, this book will be of great interest to those working in higher education, and particularly to anyone involved in policy design and the delivery of the student experience.

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