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The long-awaited third edition of this well-known textbook continues to be the go-to text and reference for anyone interested in Southwest archaeology. It provides a comprehensive summary of the major themes and topics central to modern interpretation and practice. More concise, accessible, and student-friendly, the Third Edition offers students the latest in current research, debates, and topical syntheses as well as increased coverage of Paleoindian and Archaic periods and the Casas Grandes phenomenon. It remains the perfect text for courses on Southwest archaeology at the advanced undergraduate and graduate levels and is an ideal resource book for the Southwest researchers’ bookshelf and for interested general readers.
The long awaited third edition of this well-known textbook continues to be the go-to text and reference for anyone interested in Southwestern archaeology, including the latest in current research, debates, and topical syntheses as well as increased coverage of Paleoindian and Archaic periods and the Casas Grandes phenomenon.
The beautiful landscape of the Four Corners Region and other Natural Monument areas come to life through an indispensable hiking guide covering trails suited for all skill levels, complete with maps, itineraries, and color photos. Original.
Startling discoveries and impassioned debates have emerged from the "Chaco Phenomenon" since the publication of New Light on Chaco Canyon twenty years ago. This completely updated edition features seventeen original essays, scores of photographs, maps, and site plans, and the perspectives of archaeologists, historians, and Native American thinkers. Key topics include the rise of early great houses; the structure of agricultural life among the people of Chaco Canyon; their use of sacred geography and astronomy in organizing their spiritual cosmology; indigenous knowledge about Chaco from the perspective of Hopi, Tewa, and Navajo peoples; and the place of Chaco in the wider world of archaeology.For more than a century archaeologists and others have pursued Chaco Canyon's many and elusive meanings. In Search of Chaco brings these explorations to a new generation of enthusiasts.
Combining anthropology, archeology, and evolutionary theory, Paul E. Minnis develops a model of how tribal societies deal with severe food shortages. While focusing on the prehistory of the Rio Mimbres region of New Mexico, he provides comparative data from the Fringe Enga of New Guinea, the Tikopia of Tikopia Island, and the Gwembe Tonga of South Africa. Minnis proposes that, faced with the threat of food shortages, nonstratified societies survive by employing a series of responses that are increasingly effective but also are increasingly costly and demand increasingly larger cooperative efforts. The model Minnis develops allows him to infer, from evidence of such factors as population size, resource productivity, and climate change, the occurrence of food crises in the past. Using the Classic Mimbres society as a test case, he summarizes the regional archeological sequence and analyzes the effects of environmental fluctuations on economic and social organization. He concludes that the responses of the Mimbres people to their burgeoning population were inadequate to prevent the collapse of the society in the late twelfth century. In its illumination of the general issue of responses to food shortages, Social Adaptation to Food Stress will interest not only archeologists but also those concerned with current food shortages in the Third World. Cultural ecologists and human geographers will be able to derive a wealth of ideas, methods, and data from Minnis's work.
Identifies artifacts and implements characteristic to the culture of the Indians of the American Southwest and details their function and use
In 1927, the year that Charles A. Lindbergh crossed the Atlantic Ocean, another revolution was happening on the ground. A group of young archaeologists was forging an area of study centered on the ancient Southwest. Aviation and archaeology merged when Alfred V. Kidder, of the Carnegie Institution, hired Lindbergh to photograph the sites from an airplane. Lindbergh's aerial survey of the Four Corners and Upper Rio Grande, made with Anne Morrow Lindbergh at the controls and, possibly, photographing some of the sites, were the first low-angle views of the vast, interconnected ancient landscape. The Lindbergh documentation of the sites remains a valuable historic record of the northern Southwest plateau. Ninety years later, noted aerial photographer Adriel Heisey has been commissioned by Archaeology Southwest, an organization dedicated to preservation archaeology, to re-photograph the ancient sites exactly as Lindbergh did. The juxtaposition of thirty black-and-white remastered Lindbergh images and thirty contemporary color images, provides a fascinating survey of the area over nearly a century allowing a unique view of the multi-layered, cultural landscape of the American Southwest over time.

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