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A fascinating tour of the last five decades of contemporary art in New York City, showing how artists are catalysts of gentrification and how neighborhoods in turn shape their art--with special insights into the work of artists such as Jean-Michel Basquiat, Cindy Sherman, and Jeff Koons Stories of New York City's fabled art scene conjure up artists' lofts in SoHo, studios in Brooklyn, and block after block of galleries in Chelsea. But today, no artist can afford a SoHo loft, Brooklyn has long gentrified, and even the galleries of Chelsea are beginning to move on. Art on the Block takes the reader on a journey through the neighborhoods that shape, and are shaped by, New York's ever-evolving art world. Based on interviews with over 150 gallery directors, as well as the artists themselves, art historian and cultural commentator Ann Fensterstock explores the genesis, expansion, maturation and ultimate restless migration of the New York art world from one initially undiscovered neighborhood to the next. Opening with the colonization of the desolate South Houston Industrial District in the late 1960s, the book follows the art world's subsequent elopements to the East Village in the ‘80s, Brooklyn in the mid-90s, Chelsea at the beginning of the new millennium and, most recently, to the Lower East Side. With a look to the newest neighborhoods that artists are just now beginning to occupy, this is a must-read for both art enthusiasts as well as anyone with a passion for New York City.
Block was a hugely influential journal in the developing fields of Visual and Cultural Studies. The journal's editors and contributors sought to further the critical tradition in art history, respond to the work of contemporary artists, and bring the concerns of new cultural and critical theory, particularly feminist and post-colonial theory, to the study of art and design history. The Block Reader brings together classic writings by leading cultural theorists and artists which were first published in the journal, to provide an invaluable resource for the teaching and study of art and design history and theory and cultural studies.
Beginning and advanced artists alike have experienced “artist's block” at some point in their endeavors. Now artists can turn to this book in their time of need. Artist's Block Cured! provides a stimulating array of ideas for beating blank canvas syndrome and conquering other creative ailments. Broken down into four color-coded categories, beginners will find activities, lessons, quizzes, and inspiration from the Masters to help jumpstart creativity. Written by creative thinker and illustrator Linda Krall, this book is an effective and entertaining tool no artist should be without!
Seminar paper from the year 2012 in the subject Art - Extra-European art, grade: A+, University of California, Los Angeles, course: Contemporary Chinese Art Seminar, language: English, abstract: This term paper explores the increasing presence of Chinese collectors of contemporary Chinese art. It is driven by the idea that collectors ‘produce’ or cultivate meaning in the larger canon of art history. Based on Belk’s analysis of collecting as a consumption activity (1991), the motivations of these collectors and the resulting implications for contemporary art are investigated. The development of patronage and art appreciation throughout China’s tumultuous past, and the current barren cultural landscape have given rise to a collector who differs greatly to the traditional model. At the same time, it is hypothesized that there exists a more deeper-lying uniquely Chinese altruism next to the amalgam of social refinement, identity, nationalistic and financial motives. On the basis of this, is suggested that whereas the current nature of collecting contemporary art in China does not yet demonstrate the high level of critical thinking and sophistication that would be beneficial for the development of the contemporary art scene, there nevertheless lies potential for a more healthy development in the years to come.
This small book has three strands. First, it is about escaping from the workaday world. Second, it is about using art and to some extent music to escape; and it is about Block Island, Rhode Island, which is a popular tourist escape destination. Block Island, referred to by some as one of the five most beautiful places in the world, is an outdoor paradise well worth a visit. With a setting fifteen miles due south from Rhode Island out into the Atlantic Ocean, it offers its entire perimeter of beaches and bluffs to the public as well as its interior greenway walking trails. Approximately 43 percent of the island land is open space. It is therefore no surprise that the island population swells from approximately a thousand in the winter to more than fifteen thousand in the summer. The painting on the cover depicts a double-ender sailboat of the type that Block Islanders used in the 1920s and 1930s. Block Islanders used the double ender to fish and travel back and forth to the mainland. The boat is remembered in the Block Island annual Fourth of July double-ender parade as a small, versatile craft that could sail well in heavy air, be hauled out on the beach for safekeeping at night, and could carry large loads of fish. The hull comes to a point at the bow and again at the stern to split the waves breaking in the front and back. It carried stones from the beach for ballast until they were jettisoned and replaced by a like weight in fish. From twenty-five to forty feet in length, with a crew of two, this was the only mode of transportation to and from the island for many years. The painting reflects an image in my head, and I created it on an eleven-by-fourteen-inch canvas in heavy body acrylic. The robust and almost primitive style of the art is offered to represent the weather-oriented life and nature of early islanders. I often escape from daily life by imagining my hand on the tiller of this boat in a storm. It was with that feeling that I used the paintbrush to cut the unique curves in the painting. In this book I talk of looking into one’s head for escape, satisfaction, and comfort. Most Block Islanders, because of the nature of their isolation, also have learned, in my opinion, to look inward for satisfaction and comfort and to escape. During the past decade, I have come to know Island visitors as a resident, as a water taxi driver in New Harbor, and as an artist in the Spring Street Art Gallery. It appears to me that most people come to the island with visions of escape in their minds. Island visitors and residents, for the most part, have chosen to escape from the mainland—or America, as Islanders describe it—to enjoy a more relaxed life surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean. Willy-nilly describes life on the island, spontaneous and haphazard! This story is autobiographical with a philosophical flavor. The paintings reproduced in these pages are my interpretation on the escapist theme. The paintings argue that for me becoming an artist was a good way to escape. Singing was another! Singing and painting are two of the ways I have chosen to escape. When painting, I never use a photo or any other document to guide my artistic production. Reaching into my head has turned out to be fun, and writing about escapism has also turned out to be fun! I conclude that it is fun to escape! Perhaps an exploration of what is in your head will result in a new artistic pursuit!

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