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This book presents a series of cultural situations that could occur within the first onehundred days of a school year: responding to entrenched vocabularies and behaviors, addressing professional and instructional bad habits, enacting alternative teaching scripts, leveraging a policy blindside, redefining the goals and practices of teams, and implementing outsidethebox programs. Each cultural situation offers a new school leader the opportunity to redefine the goals, values, and practices of an entrenched school culture—the Central High way. Administrators reading the title of this book may view one hundred days as an arbitrary number picked out of administrative thin air. I argue that disrupting and replacing organizational and instructional routines is a race against time. Every school day that goes by without some sign of creative destruction is one more day that comfortable organizational and instructional routines live on in main offices and classrooms. The idea for this book originated from a question I asked a former student of mine who had just signed a contract to become the principal of a high school. We were discussing the complexities of changing a school culture when I asked the following question: “What would you do on the first day in your new office to change your school’s culture?” The response to that question described a series managerial routines that all new administrators have learned to perform as they move from the classroom to the main office: organize the office, meet staff, tour the building, write a newsletter, examine data, and visit community venues. Nothing in this conversation described strategies for redefining the beliefs and values of an entrenched school culture. With this conversation in mind, I made it a point in my formal and informal contacts with school administrators to always ask the question: “What would you do in the first day in your new office to change your school’s culture?” The most common responses involved reviewing district documents, touring facilities, meeting staff, listening to stakeholders and managing systems. In each conversation, school leaders populated their responses with the current jargon of school reform: learning communities, data mining, standardsbased curriculum, differentiated learning, common core standards, formative assessment, race to the top, continuous improvement, etc. While these responses encompass reasonable behaviors on the first day in the main office, not one of these actions possesses the capacity to connect educational values expressed in school mission statements—why are we here—to daily organizational and instructional routines. Each activity gives the appearance of leading, but produces no connections between beliefs, values, and practices. Although none of these responses would make or break a school culture, they do represent a pattern of thinking and behaving that holds out little possibility of fundamentally changing a school’s culture.
The "New York Times"-bestselling author of "Great by Choice" deliversan authoritative, practical guide to individual performance based on analysisfrom an exhaustive, groundbreaking study.
First published in 2007. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
As countries strive to reform education systems and improve student results, school leadership is high on education policy agendas. But in many countries, the men and women who run schools are overburdened, underpaid and near retirement. Based on an OECD study of school leadership practices and policies around the world, and offering a cross country perspective, Volume 1 identifies four policy levers and a range of policy options to help governments improve school leadership now and build sustainable leadership for the future. Volume 2 explores what specialists are saying about system leadership for school improvement. Case studies examine innovative approaches to sharing leadership across schools in Belgium (Flanders), Finland and the United Kingdom (England) and leadership development programs for system improvement in Australia and Austria. As these are emerging practices, the book provides a first international comparison and assessment of the state of the art of system leadership.--Publisher's description.
The faculty at the University of Houston's program in Futures Studies share their comprehensive, integrated approach to preparing foresight professionals and assisting others doing foresight projects. Provides an essential guide to developing classes on the future or even establishing whole degree programs.
Change your child’s future starting today: Learn how to use Stephen R. Covey’s proven 7 Habits to create a leadership program for kids of all ages so they can be more effective, more goal oriented, and more successful In today’s world, we are inundated with information about who to be, what to do, and how to live. But what if there was a way to learn not just what to think about, but how to think? A program that taught how to manage priorities, focus on goals, and be a positive influence? The Leader in Me is that program. In this bestseller, Stephen R. Covey took the 7 Habits that have already changed the lives of millions of readers and showed how even young children can use them as they develop. These habits—be proactive, begin with the end in mind, put first things first, think win-win, seek to understand and then to be understood, synergize, and sharpen the saw—are being adapted by schools around the country in leadership programs, most famously at the A.B Combs Elementary school in Raleigh. Not only does it work, but it works better than anyone could have imaged. This book is full of examples of how the students blossom under the program—the classroom that decided to form a support group for one of their classmates who had behavioral problems, the fourth grader who found a way to overcome his fear of public speaking and wound up taking his class to see him compete in a national story telling competitive, or the seven-year-old who told her father than they needed to go outside and play because they both needed to “sharpen the saw.” Perfect for individuals and corporations alike, The Leader in Me shows how easy it is to incorporate these skills into daily life. It is a timely answer to many of the challenges facing today’s young people, businesses, parents, and educators—one that is perfectly matched to the growing demands of our certain future.

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