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Called "the most influential Christian book of the nineteenth century," Ben-Hur A Tale of the Christ was a best-seller in the 1880s, eclipsing the sales of Uncle Tom's Cabin and, later, Gone With the Wind to become the best-selling American novel of all time. The story recounts the adventures of Judah Ben-Hur, a fictional Jewish prince from Jerusalem, who is enslaved by the Romans at the beginning of the 1st century and becomes a charioteer and a Christian. Parallel with Judah's narrative is the unfolding story of Jesus, who comes from the same region and is a similar age. The novel reflects themes of betrayal, conviction, and redemption, with a revenge plot that leads to a story of love and compassion.This new edition of Ben-Hur A Tale of the Christ includes an Includes Free Audiobook
English journalist Frank Morison had a tremendous drive to learn of Christ. The strangeness of the Resurrection story had captured his attention, and, influenced by skeptic thinkers at the turn of the century, he set out to prove that the story of Christ’s Resurrection was only a myth. His probings, however, led him to discover the validity of the biblical record in a moving, personal way. Who Moved the Stone? is considered by many to be a classic apologetic on the subject of the Resurrection. Morison includes a vivid and poignant account of Christ’s betrayal, trial, and death as a backdrop to his retelling of the climactic Resurrection itself.—Print Ed. Reviews: “It is not only a study on the Resurrection account as the title seems to suggest, but it retells the whole passion of Jesus Christ. Because the author does not concern himself with textual criticism, he is able to impress on the reader a consistent picture of the events of Passion and Resurrection. For this reason the book will perform a helpful service to everyone who wants a reconstruction of those events.”—Augustana Book News “A well-arranged summary of events relating to the resurrection of Christ and the pros and cons in the debate over their acceptance with emphasis on the latter.”—Watchman Examiner “The story Mr. Morison has told of the betrayal and the trial of Christ is fascinating in its lucid, its almost incontrovertible, appeal to the reason. For me, he made those scenes live with a poignancy and vividness that I have found in no other account, not even in the various attempts that have been made to present the same facts in the guise of a novel.”—J. D. Beresford
Huxley's bleak future prophesized in Brave New World was a capitalist civilization which had been reconstituted through scientific and psychological engineering, a world in which people are genetically designed to be passive and useful to the ruling class. Satirical and disturbing, Brave New World is set some 600 years ahead, in "this year of stability, A.F. 632"--the A.F. standing for After Ford, meaning the godlike Henry Ford. "Community, Identity, Stability," is the motto. Reproduction is controlled through genetic engineering, and people are bred into a rigid class system. As they mature, they are conditioned to be happy with the roles that society has created for them. The rest of their lives are devoted to the pursuit of pleasure through sex, recreational sports, the getting and having of material possessions, and taking a drug called Soma. Concepts such as family, freedom, love, and culture are considered grotesque. Against this backdrop, a young man known as John the Savage is brought to London from the remote desert of New Mexico. What he sees in the new civilization a "brave new world" (quoting Shakespeare's The Tempest). However, ultimately, John challenges the basic premise of this society in an act that threatens and fascinates its citizens. Huxley uses his entire prowess to throw the idea of utopia into reverse, presenting us what is known as the "dystopian" novel. When Brave New World was written (1931), neither Hitler nor Stalin had risen to power. Huxley saw the enduring threat to society from the dark side of scientific and social progress, and mankind's increasing appetite for simple amusement. Brave New World is a work that indicts the idea of progress for progress sake and is backed up with force and reason.
"A serious and good philosophical work could be written consisting entirely of jokes." -- Ludwig WittgensteinThe good news is that this book offers an entertaining but enlightening compilation of Žižekisms. Unlike any other book by Slavoj Žižek, this compact arrangement of jokes culled from his writings provides an index to certain philosophical, political, and sexual themes that preoccupy him. Žižek's Jokes contains the set-ups and punch lines -- as well as the offenses and insults -- that Žižek is famous for, all in less than 200 pages. So what's the bad news? There is no bad news. There's just the inimitable Slavoj Žižek, disguised as an impossibly erudite, politically incorrect uncle, beginning a sentence, "There is an old Jewish joke, loved by Derrida..." For Žižek, jokes are amusing stories that offer a shortcut to philosophical insight. He illustrates the logic of the Hegelian triad, for example, with three variations of the "Not tonight, dear, I have a headache" classic: first the wife claims a migraine; then the husband does; then the wife exclaims, "Darling, I have a terrible migraine, so let's have some sex to refresh me!" A punch line about a beer bottle provides a Lacanian lesson about one signifier. And a "truly obscene" version of the famous "aristocrats" joke has the family offering a short course in Hegelian thought rather than a display of unspeakables. Žižek's Jokes contains every joke cited, paraphrased, or narrated in Žižek's work in English (including some in unpublished manuscripts), including different versions of the same joke that make different points in different contexts. The larger point being that comedy is central to Žižek's seriousness.
This book contains the following works: - Alighieri, Dante: The Divine Comedy - Andersen, Hans Christian: The Complete Fairy Tales and Stories - Arnim, Elizabeth Von: The Enchanted April - Austen, Jane: Emma - Austen, Jane: Persuasion - Austen, Jane: Pride and Prejudice - Balzac, Honoré de: Father Goriot - Brontë, Anne: The Tenant of Wildfell Hall - Brontë, Charlotte: Jane Eyre - Brontë, Emily: Wuthering Heights - Butler, Samuel: The Way of All Flesh - Cervantes, Miguel de: Don Quixote - Conrad, Joseph: Heart of Darkness - Conrad, Joseph: Nostromo - Defoe, Daniel: Moll Flanders - Dickens, Charles: Bleak House - Dickens, Charles: Great Expectations - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor: Crime and Punishment - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor: The Brothers Karamazov - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor: The Idiot - Doyle, Arthur Conan: The Hound of the Baskervilles - Dumas, Alexandre: The Count of Monte Cristo - Eliot, George: Daniel Deronda - Eliot, George: Middlemarch - Flaubert, Gustave: Madame Bovary - Gogol, Nikolai: Dead Souls - Grimm, The Brothers: The Complete Fairy Tales - Homer: The Iliad - Homer: The Odyssey - Hugo, Victor: Les Misérables - James, Henry: The Portray of a Lady - Joyce, James: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - Joyce, James: Ulysses - Lawrence, D. H.: Sons and Lovers - Lawrence, D. H.: The Rainbow - London, Jack: The Call of the Wild - Melville, Herman: Moby Dick - Proust, Marcel: Swann's Way - Stendhal: The Red and the Black - Sterne, Laurence: The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman - Stoker, Bram: Dracula - Swift, Jonathan: Gulliver's Travels - Thackeray, William Makepeace: Vanity Fair - Tolstoy, Leo: Anna Karenina - Tolstoy, Leo: The Death of Ivan Ilyich - Tolstoy, Leo: War and Peace - Twain, Mark: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Wharton, Edith: The Age of Innocence - Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray - Zola, Émile: Germinal
ShandonPress proudly presents the Orientalism compilation which regroups major orientalist works (both paintings and writings). Orientalism is a term used by scholars in art history, literary, geography, and cultural studies for the depiction of Eastern, that is "Oriental" cultures, including Middle Eastern, North African, South Asian and Southeast Asian cultures, done by writers, designers, and artists from the West. In particular, Orientalist painting depicting "the Middle East" was a genre of 19th-century Academic art. The literature of Western countries took a similar interest in Oriental themes. We hope you enjoy navigating through this ebook. We made sure to create active tables of contents in order to maximise your reading and viewing experience. CONTENTS: 1. Paintings 1.1 Harems 1.1.A Jean-Jules-Antoine Lecomte du Nouÿ, The White Slave (1888) 1.1.B Fernand Cormon, The Deposed Favourite (1872) 1.1.C Jean-Léon Gérôme, Pool in a Harem (1876) 1.1.D Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Grande Odalisque (1814) 1.1.E Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, with the assistance of his pupil Paul Flandrin, Odalisque with Slave (1839) 1.1.F Ferdinand Max Bredt, Turkish ladies (1893) 1.1.G Giulio Rosati, Inspection of New Arrivals, Circassian beauties being inspected 1.1.H John Frederick Lewis, The Reception (1873) 1.1.I Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, The Turkish Bath (1862) 1.2 Landscapes And Other Paintings 1.2.A Hermann Corrodi, A view of the tomb of the Caliphs with the pyramids of Giza beyond, Cairo 1.2.B Eugène Fromentin, Arabs (1871) 1.2.C Léon Belly, Pilgrims going to Mecca (1861) 1.2.D Vasily Vereshchagin, They are triumphant (1872) 1.2.E Anders Zorn, Man and boy in Algiers (1887) 1.2.F John Frederick Lewis, The midday meal, Cairo 1.2.G Giulio Rosati, The Discussion 2. Writings 2.1 Lord Byron - The Giaour (A Fragment Of A Turkish Tale) 2.2 William Beckford - The History Of Caliph Vathek 2.3 Pierre Benoit - Atlantida 2.4 Gustave Flaubert - Salammbô 2.5 Théophile Gautier - The Romance Of A Mummy

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