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Black people have inhabited the British Isles for centuries. Eminent professor Paul Gilroy, renowned for his work exploring the social and cultural dimensions of British blackness and black Britishness, has assembled a living visual history of blacks in the British Isles. Watershed moments include the rise and commercial circulation of black culture and music, the world wars, the Manchester Pan African Congress, the historic settlement of the Windrush generation and the riots of the 1980s. Luminaries drawn from politics, art and sport appear alongside many pioneers.
This book analyses narratives that center on, construct, or comment on black British history. Outlining the emergence of black history in Britain and shifts in the politics of history, it principally focuses on recent narratives that engage critically with the historical culture surrounding black Britain.
This Companion offers a comprehensive account of the influence of contemporary British Black and Asian writing in British culture. While there are a number of anthologies covering Black and Asian literature, there is no volume that comparatively addresses fiction, poetry, plays and performance, and provides critical accounts of the qualities and impact within one book. It charts the distinctive Black and Asian voices within the body of British writing and examines the creative and cultural impact that African, Caribbean and South Asian writers have had on British literature. It analyzes literary works from a broad range of genres, while also covering performance writing and non-fiction. It offers pertinent historical context throughout, and new critical perspectives on such key themes as multiculturalism and evolving cultural identities in contemporary British literature. This Companion explores race, politics, gender, sexuality, identity, amongst other key literary themes in Black and Asian British literature. It will serve as a key resource for scholars, graduates, teachers and students alike.
Paul Gilroy has been a controversial force at the forefront of debates around race, nation, and diaspora. Working across a broad range of disciplines, Gilroy has argued that racial identities are historically constructed, formed by colonization, slavery, nationalist philosophies, and consumer capitalism. Paul Williams introduces Gilroy's key themes and ideas, including: the essential concepts, including ethnic absolutism, civilizationism, postcolonial melancholia, iconization, and the 'black Atlantic' analysis of Gilroy's broad-ranging cultural references, from Edmund Burke to hip-hop a comprehensive overview of Gilroy's influences and the academic debates his work has inspired. Emphasizing the timeliness and global relevance of Gilroy's ideas, this guide will appeal to anyone approaching Gilroy's work for the first time or seeking to further their understanding of race and contemporary culture.
In 1980s Britain, while the country failed to reckon with the legacies of its empire, a black, transnational sensibility was emerging in its urban areas. In Handsworth, an inner-city neighborhood of Birmingham, black residents looked across the Atlantictoward African and Afro-Caribbean social and political cultures and drew upon them while navigating the inequalities of their locale. For those of the Windrush generation and their British-born children, this diasporic inheritance became a core influence on cultural and political life. Through rich case studies, including photographic representations of the neighborhood, Black Handsworth takes readers inside pubs, churches, political organizations, domestic spaces, and social clubs to shed light on the experiences and everyday lives of black residents during this time. The result is a compelling and sophisticated study of black globality in the making of post-colonial Britain.
It is impossible to overestimate the importance of Stuart Hall’s work in shaping the field of racial and ethnic studies for nearly five decades. From his groundbreaking work Policing the Crisis through to his paradigm shattering ‘New Ethnicities’, Hall’s writing has redefined how race research is thought and done, while Hall himself stands as an exemplar of the public and politically engaged intellectual. This collection of essays, from established and emerging scholars, critically engages with Hall’s legacy across this body of work, from the foundations of cultural studies as a field of enquiry, through his work on race and articulation, to his insights into ‘the politics of difference’ and diaspora identities. These essays both reflect back on Hall’s interventions and locate them within some of the key spaces and questions of our time – from the ‘political theology’ of race in South Africa to the terrain of the contemporary city, from reflections on memory, nationhood and belonging to new ethnicities online and the formation of postcolonial subjectivities. The collection includes an in-depth conversation between Les Back and Stuart Hall, in which Hall reflects on his career and explores the challenges facing contemporary multicultural, multifaith societies in a globalised world. This book was published as a special issue of Cultural Studies.
A dynamic visual history that showcases the diverse influence of Southeast Asians on contemporary British life.

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