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Blogging has profoundly influenced not only the nature of the internet today, but also the nature of modern communication, despite being a genre invented less than a decade ago. This book-length study of a now everyday phenomenon provides a close look at blogging while placing it in a historical, theoretical and contemporary context. Scholars, students and bloggers will find a lively survey of blogging that contextualises blogs in terms of critical theory and the history of digital media. Authored by a scholar-blogger, the book is packed with examples that show how blogging and related genres are changing media and communication. It gives definitions and explains how blogs work, shows how blogs relate to the historical development of publishing and communication and looks at the ways blogs structure social networks and at how social networking sites like MySpace and Facebook incorporate blogging in their design. Specific kinds of blogs discussed include political blogs, citizen journalism, confessional blogs and commercial blogs.
Superconnected: The Internet, Digital Media, and Techno-Social Life, Second Edition brings together the latest research from many relevant fields to examine how contemporary social life is mediated by various digital technologies: the internet, social media, and mobile devices. The book explores such topics as how digital technology led to the modern information age, information sharing and surveillance, how digital media shape socialization and development of the self, digital divides that separate groups in society, and the impact of digital media across social institutions. The author’s clear, nontechnical discussions and interdisciplinary synthesis make Superconnected an essential text for any course that examines how social life is affected when information and communication technology enter the picture. Dr. Mary Chayko is a sociologist, Teaching Professor of Communication and Information, and Director of Undergraduate Interdisciplinary Studies at the School of Communication and Information (SC&I) at Rutgers University. For more on the author and for instructor resources, visit her book blog at http://superconnectedblog.com. New to the Edition Current events, the latest statistics and new research findings are reflected throughout the book, including richly-detailed sections on the rise of “fake” news and information, the human-machine relationship, and the history and implications of the “dark web” and the “deep web.” The book’s companion blog, superconnectedblog.com, now includes customizable lecture slides and discussion questions for each chapter. Short podcasts, recorded by the author and posted to her blog, provide fun, unique points of access to every chapter.
What can flame-throwing squirrels tell us about human emotion? Can social media empower political activism? How has the internet changed the way we form our identities? Do algorithms have a social role? What is digital society? In the early 21st century, digital media and the social have become irreversibly intertwined. In this cutting-edge introduction, author Simon Lindgren explores what it means to live in a digital society. Neatly divided into three sections, Digital Media and Society expertly leads students through: Theories: from social media and cyber-optimism, to online social interaction and social change Topics: from emotion, participation and the public sphere, to the impact of data, software and mobile technology Tools: from digital ethnography, social network analysis and text-mining, to guidance on digital ethics and mixing methods With succinct explanations of key concepts and theories, practical exercises to aid understanding and application, and suggested further reading sections to guide students through the literature and enhance their own research, this is a must-have resource for all students of the digital society. Digital Media and Society is essential reading for undergraduate and postgraduate courses exploring digital media, social media, media and society, media sociology, and the Internet.
Referencing key contemporary debates on issues like surveillance, identity, the global financial crisis, the digital divide and Internet politics, Andrew White provides a critical intervention in discussions on the impact of the proliferation of digital media technologies on politics, the economy and social practices.
The rise of digital media has been widely regarded as transforming the nature of our social experience in the twenty-first century. The speed with which new forms of connectivity and communication are being incorporated into our everyday lives often gives us little time to stop and consider the social implications of those practices. Nonetheless, it is critically important that we do so, and this sociological introduction to the field of digital technologies is intended to enable a deeper understanding of their prominent role in everyday life. The fundamental theoretical and ethical debates on the sociology of the digital media are presented in accessible summaries, ranging from economy and technology to criminology and sexuality. Key theoretical paradigms are explored through a broad range of contemporary social phenomena – from social networking and virtual lives to the rise of cybercrime and identity theft, from the utopian ideals of virtual democracy to the Orwellian nightmare of the surveillance society, from the free software movement to the implications of online shopping. As an entry-level pathway for students in sociology, media, communications and cultural studies, the aim of this work is to situate the rise of digital media within the context of a complex and rapidly changing world.
Scholars from communication and media studies join those from science and technology studies to examine media technologies as complex, sociomaterial phenomena.
We – the users turned creators and distributors of content – are TIME’s Person of the Year 2006, and AdAge’s Advertising Agency of the Year 2007. We form a new Generation C. We have MySpace, YouTube, and OurMedia; we run social software, and drive the development of Web 2.0. But beyond the hype, what’s really going on? In this groundbreaking exploration of our developing participatory online culture, Axel Bruns establishes the core principles which drive the rise of collaborative content creation in environments, from open source through blogs and Wikipedia to Second Life. This book shows that what’s emerging here is no longer just a new form of content production, but a new process for the continuous creation and extension of knowledge and art by collaborative communities: produsage. The implications of the gradual shift from production to produsage are profound, and will affect the very core of our culture, economy, society, and democracy.

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