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Thoroughly revised and updated, this new edition of Blogging provides an accessible study of a now everyday phenomenon and places it in a historical, theoretical and contemporary context. The second edition takes into account the most recent research and developments and provides current analyses of new tools for microblogging and visual blogging. Jill Walker Rettberg discusses the ways blogs are integrated into today’s mainstream social media ecology, where comments and links from Twitter and Facebook may be more important than the network between blogs that was significant five years ago, and questions the shift towards increased commercialization and corporate control of blogs. The new edition also analyses how smart phones with cameras and social media have led a shift towards more visual emphasis in blogs, with photographs and graphics increasingly foregrounded. Authored by a scholar-blogger, this engaging book is packed with examples that show how blogging and related genres are changing media and communication. It gives definitions and explains how blogs work, shows how blogs relate to the historical development of publishing and communication and looks at the ways blogs structure social networks.
The original edition of this accessible and interdisciplinary textbook was the first to consider the ethical issues of digital media from a global perspective, introducing ethical theories from multiple cultures. This second edition has been thoroughly updated to cover current research and scholarship, and recent developments and technological changes. It also benefits from extensively updated case-studies and pedagogical material, including examples of “watershed” events such as privacy policy developments on Facebook and Google+ in relation to ongoing changes in privacy law in the US, the EU, and Asia. New for the second edition is a section on “citizen journalism” and its implications for traditional journalistic ethics. With a significantly updated section on the “ethical toolkit,” this book also introduces students to prevailing ethical theories and illustrates how they are applied to central issues such as privacy, copyright, pornography and violence, and the ethics of cross-cultural communication online. Digital Media Ethics is student- and classroom-friendly: each topic and theory is interwoven throughout the volume with detailed sets of questions, additional resources, and suggestions for further research and writing. Together, these enable readers to foster careful reflection upon, writing about, and discussion of these issues and their possible resolutions.
Bloggers around the world produce material for local, national and international audiences, yet they are developing in ways that are distinct from the U.S. model. Through case studies of blogs written in English, Chinese, Arab, French, Russian, and Hebrew, this book explores the way blogging is being conceptualized in different cultural contexts. The authors move beyond the most highly trafficked sites to shed light on larger developments taking place online, calling into question assumptions that form the foundation of much of what we read on blogging and, by extension, on global amateur or do-it-yourself media. This book suggests a more nuanced approach to understanding how blogospheres serve communication needs, how they exist in relation to one another, where they exist apart as well as where they overlap, and how they interact with other forms of communication in the larger media landscape.
The rise of digital media has been widely regarded as transforming the nature of our social experience in the twenty-first century. The speed with which new forms of connectivity and communication are being incorporated into our everyday lives often gives us little time to stop and consider the social implications of those practices. Nonetheless, it is critically important that we do so, and this sociological introduction to the field of digital technologies is intended to enable a deeper understanding of their prominent role in everyday life. The fundamental theoretical and ethical debates on the sociology of the digital media are presented in accessible summaries, ranging from economy and technology to criminology and sexuality. Key theoretical paradigms are explored through a broad range of contemporary social phenomena – from social networking and virtual lives to the rise of cybercrime and identity theft, from the utopian ideals of virtual democracy to the Orwellian nightmare of the surveillance society, from the free software movement to the implications of online shopping. As an entry-level pathway for students in sociology, media, communications and cultural studies, the aim of this work is to situate the rise of digital media within the context of a complex and rapidly changing world.
What can flame-throwing squirrels tell us about human emotion? Can social media empower political activism? How has the internet changed the way we form our identities? Do algorithms have a social role? What is digital society? In the early 21st century, digital media and the social have become irreversibly intertwined. In this cutting-edge introduction, author Simon Lindgren explores what it means to live in a digital society. Neatly divided into three sections, Digital Media and Society expertly leads students through: Theories: from social media and cyber-optimism, to online social interaction and social change Topics: from emotion, participation and the public sphere, to the impact of data, software and mobile technology Tools: from digital ethnography, social network analysis and text-mining, to guidance on digital ethics and mixing methods With succinct explanations of key concepts and theories, practical exercises to aid understanding and application, and suggested further reading sections to guide students through the literature and enhance their own research, this is a must-have resource for all students of the digital society. Digital Media and Society is essential reading for undergraduate and postgraduate courses exploring digital media, social media, media and society, media sociology, and the Internet.
Blogging: How Our Private Thoughts Went Public examines self-representational writing from its historical roots in personal diaries to its current form in personal blogs. Widely available on the Internet, personal blogs are the latest form of an ever more public writing style of self-reflection. Utilizing Hannah Arendt’s philosophy of public, private, and social, this book delves deeper into the question of public versus private and provides an entrance for Arendt’s work into today’s mediated world. Arendt’s understanding of public, private, and social allows us to better understand the need for boundaries and for both public and private spaces in our lives. Interpersonal communication theories, including boundary management theory and parasocial framework theory, help to better understand how people navigate public and private boundaries in communication. These theories provide a philosophical view of our overshared and overmediated world, and, specifically, how it affects our communication styles and practices.
The music industry is going through a period of immense change brought about in part by the digital revolution. What is the role of music in the age of computers and the internet? How has the music industry been transformed by the economic and technological upheavals of recent years, and how is it likely to change in the future? This is the first major study of the music industry in the new millennium. Wikström provides an international overview of the music industry and its future prospects in the world of global entertainment. They illuminate the workings of the music industry, and capture the dynamics at work in the production of musical culture between the transnational media conglomerates, the independent music companies and the public. The Music Industry will become a standard work on the music industry at the beginning of the 21st century. It will be of great interest to students and scholars of media and communication studies, cultural studies, popular music, sociology and economics. It will also be of great value to professionals in the music industry, policy makers, and to anyone interested in the future of music.
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