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The first book about the investigation into the attempted murder of Hustler magazine publisher Larry Flynt—and the serial killer who shot him. In Gwinnett County, Georgia, in 1978, Larry Flynt and his attorney were shot and injured on their way back to court during an obscenity trial. This true account of the crime is told alternately from Det. J. Michael Cowart’s perspective and chronologically following the shooter’s life from childhood through his execution. The monster that was Joseph Paul Franklin was the result of a perfect storm of circumstances, which included poverty, cruel abuse as a child, the detestation and mistrust between blacks and whites, integration, and the hate groups that operated and recruited openly. Cowart tells the story of how his attempts to befriend Franklin gave him the information he needed to prosecute the case—and gave him astonishing insight into many of Franklin’s other cold-blooded killings and crimes, and his twisted justification for them. Blood in the Soil details with stark honesty the terrible truths that characterized the South during the volatility of the sixties and seventies, and the ugly reality that lay just beneath its veneer of warm hospitality.
There is a story in the Bible that many churches avoid like the plague, and most of it is laid out in the Book of Revelation. Revelation is the Final Act in God’s Great Play, and is arguably the most important. So why is it avoided? Blessed is he who reads and those who hear the words of this prophecy, and keep those things which are written in it; for the time is near. Revelation 1:3 NKJV The Third Woe After the Two Witnesses rise there is an earthquake in Jerusalem, seven-thousand dead. Then the Third and Final Woe begins with a blast from a trumpet in the heavens, and everyone in the world will know: The End Really is Near.
This book focuses on religiously driven oppositional violence through the ages. Beginning with the 1st-century Sicari, it examines the commonalities that link apocalypticism, revolution, and terrorism occurring in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam past and present. It is divided into two sections, 'This was Then' and 'This is Now', which together examine the cultural and religious history of oppositional violence from the time of Jesus to the aftermath of the 2016 American election. The historical focus centers on how the movements, leaders and revolutionaries from earlier times are interpreted today through the lenses of historical memory and popular culture. The radical right is the primary but not exclusive focus of the second part of the book. At the same time, the work is intensely personal, in that it incorporates the author's experiences in the worlds of communist Eastern Europe, in the Iranian Revolution, and in the uprisings and wars in the Middle East and East Africa. This book will be of much interest to students of religious and political violence, religious studies, history, and security studies.
Family events, whether holidays, reunions, weddings or funerals, are fraught with stress, tension and emotion just waiting to bubble over and make a big mess. Southern Fried White Trash is a light-hearted collection of stories about just such events, told through the eyes of a woman born and raised in the South. Author Carole Townsend’s conversational-style wit and tongue-in-cheek humor relates one story after another about family events and the off-beat, crazy behavior that so often goes hand in hand with them.
A painfully humorous survival guide to successfully navigating life as a woman This insightful book takes a humorous but accurate look at how women (baby boomers, plus those a few years this side of that generation) were taught to view and prepare for life as young girls, vs. the reality of being a woman and handling all that women do, every day, day in and day out. As adults, moms, wives, sisters, friends, lovers and professionals, we are expected to handle, juggle, balance, earn, nurture and be always-on-call caregivers.
More than fifteen years in the making, Blood and Politics is the most comprehensive history to date of the white supremacist movement as it has evolved over the past three-plus decades. Leonard Zeskind draws heavily upon court documents, racist publications, and first-person reports, along with his own personal observations. An internationally recognized expert on the subject who received a MacArthur Fellowship for his work, Zeskind ties together seemingly disparate strands—from neo-Nazi skinheads, to Holocaust deniers, to Christian Identity churches, to David Duke, to the militia and beyond. Among these elements, two political strategies—mainstreaming and vanguardism—vie for dominance. Mainstreamers believe that a majority of white Christians will eventually support their cause. Vanguardists build small organizations made up of a highly dedicated cadre and plan a naked seizure of power. Zeskind shows how these factions have evolved into a normative social movement that looks like a demographic slice of white America, mostly blue-collar and working middle class, with lawyers and Ph.D.s among its leaders. When the Cold War ended, traditional conservatives helped birth a new white nationalism, most evident now among anti-immigrant organizations. With the dawn of a new millennium, they are fixated on predictions that white people will lose their majority status and become one minority among many. The book concludes with a look to the future, elucidating the growing threat these groups will pose to coming generations.
“Gripping and meticulously documented.”—Don Schanche Jr., Washington Post Forsyth County, Georgia, at the turn of the twentieth century, was home to a large African American community that included ministers and teachers, farmers and field hands, tradesmen, servants, and children. But then in September of 1912, three young black laborers were accused of raping and murdering a white girl. One man was dragged from a jail cell and lynched on the town square, two teenagers were hung after a one-day trial, and soon bands of white “night riders” launched a coordinated campaign of arson and terror, driving all 1,098 black citizens out of the county. The charred ruins of homes and churches disappeared into the weeds, until the people and places of black Forsyth were forgotten. National Book Award finalist Patrick Phillips tells Forsyth’s tragic story in vivid detail and traces its long history of racial violence all the way back to antebellum Georgia. Recalling his own childhood in the 1970s and ’80s, Phillips sheds light on the communal crimes of his hometown and the violent means by which locals kept Forsyth “all white” well into the 1990s. In precise, vivid prose, Blood at the Root delivers a “vital investigation of Forsyth’s history, and of the process by which racial injustice is perpetuated in America” (Congressman John Lewis).

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