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In this book, leading experts in the field examine the current state of assessment practice and scholarship, explore what the future holds for assessment, and offer guidance to help educators meet these new challenges. The contributors root assessment squarely in several related disciplines to provide an overview of assessment practice and scholarship that will prove useful to both the seasoned educator and those new to assessment practice. Ultimately, Building a Scholarship of Assessment will help convince skeptics who still believe outcomes assessment is a fad and will soon fade away that this is an interdisciplinary area with deep roots and an exciting future.
Feedback is a crucial element of teaching, learning and assessment. There is, however, substantial evidence that staff and students are dissatisfied with it, and there is growing impetus for change. Reconceptualising Feedback in Higher Education, coming from a think-tank composed of specialist expertise in assessment feedback, is a direct and more fundamental response to the impetus for change. Its purpose is to challenge established beliefs and practices through critical evaluation of evidence and discussion of the renewal of current feedback practices.
Describes the move to outcomes-based assessment at California State University Monterey Bay. Discusses the faculty's experience with the transition and features an anecdote at the start of each chapter.
"Once again, Bob Diamond has cut to the heart of the matter and has given us a field guide?actually a handbook?of real, hands-on academic leadership. He has assembled an elite group of contributors who provide insights and guidance, which will be useful for all academic leaders?new and old, public or private, CEO or assistant." -- Charles E. Glassick, senior associate emeritus, The Carnegie Foundatio
Higher education professionals have moved from teaching- to learning-centered models for designing and assessing courses and curricula. Faculty work collaboratively to identify learning objectives and assessment strategies, set standards, design effective curricula and courses, assess the impact of their efforts on student learning, reflect on results, and implement appropriate changes to increase student learning. Assessment is an integral component of this learner-centered approach, and it involves the use of empirical data to refine programs and improve student learning. Based on the author's extensive experience conducting assessment training workshops, this book is an expansion of a workshop/consultation guide that has been used to provide assessment training to thousands of busy professionals. Assessing Academic Programs in Higher Education provides a comprehensive introduction to planning and implementing the assessment of college and university academic programs. Written for college and university administrators, assessment officers, department chairs, and faculty who are involved in developing and implementing assessment programs, this book is a realistic, pragmatic guide for developing and implementing meaningful, manageable, and sustainable assessment programs that focus faculty attention on student learning. This book will: * Guide readers through all steps in the assessment process * Provide a balanced review of the full array of assessment strategies * Explain how assessment is a crucial component of the teaching and learning process * Provide examples of successful studies that can be easily adapted * Summarize key assessment terms in an end-of-book glossary
This is a practical resource for community and two year college professionals engaged at all levels of learning outcomes assessment, in both academic and co-curricular environments. It is designed as a guide both to inform the creation of new assessment efforts and to enhance and strengthen assessment programs already established, or in development. Each chapter addresses a key component of the assessment process, beginning with the creation of a learning-centered culture and the development and articulation of shared outcomes goals and priorities. Subsequent chapters lead the reader through the development of a plan, the selection of assessment methods, and the analysis of results. The book concludes by discussing the communication of results and their use in decision making; integrating the conclusions in program review as well as to inform budgeting; and, finally, evaluating the process for continuous improvement, as well as engaging in reflection. The book is illustrated by examples developed by faculty and student affairs/services professionals at community and two year colleges from across the country. Furthermore, to ensure its relevance and applicability for its targeted readership, each chapter has at least one author who is a community college or two-year college professional. Contributors are drawn from the following colleges: Borough of Manhattan Community College David Phillips Buffalo State College Joy Battison Kimberly Kline Booker Piper Butler County Community College Sunday Faseyitan California State University, Fullerton John Hoffman Genesee Community College Thomas Priester Virginia Taylor Heald College Megan Lawrence Stephanie Romano (now with Education Affiliates) Hobart and William Smith Colleges Stacey Pierce Miami Dade College John Frederick Barbara Rodriguez Northern Illinois University Victoria Livingston Paradise Valley Community College Paul Dale San Diego Mesa College Jill Baker Julianna Barnes San Diego State University Marilee Bresciani San Juan College David Eppich Stark State College Barbara Milliken University of Akron Sandra Coyner Megan Moore Gardner
No less than other divisions of the college or university, contemporary writing centers find themselves within a galaxy of competing questions and demands that relate to assessment—questions and demands that usually embed priorities from outside the purview of the writing center itself. Writing centers are used to certain kinds of assessment, both quantitative and qualitative, but are often unprepared to address larger institutional or societal issues. In Building Writing Center Assessments that Matter, Schendel and Macauley start from the kinds of assessment strengths already in place in writing centers, and they build a framework that can help writing centers satisfy local needs and put them in useful dialogue with the larger needs of their institutions, while staying rooted in writing assessment theory. The authors begin from the position that tutoring writers is already an assessment activity, and that good assessment practice (rooted in the work of Adler-Kassner, O'Neill, Moore, and Huot) already reflects the values of writing center theory and practice. They offer examples of assessments developed in local contexts, and of how assessment data built within those contexts can powerfully inform decisions and shape the futures of local writing centers. With additional contributions by Neal Lerner, Brian Huot and Nicole Caswell, and with a strong commitment to honoring on-site local needs, the volume does not advocate a one-size-fits-all answer. But, like the modeling often used in a writing consultation, examples here illustrate how important assessment principles have been applied in a range of local contexts. Ultimately, Building Writing Assessments that Matter describes a theory stance toward assessment for writing centers that honors the uniqueness of the writing center context, and examples of assessment in action that are concrete, manageable, portable, and adaptable.
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