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Jack Leblanc shares the lessons he has learnt in 20 years of doing business in China. His career has included stints as a salesman, dotcom entrepreneur, venture capital broker, business consultant, and finally cross-cultural troubleshooter, solving problems between foreign investors and their Chinese counterparts. Each chapter is written in story form and covers a situation that investors are likely to face: for instance, disputes over intellectual property, staffing, or localized corruption. Practical and entertaining.
One has to marvel at the tremendous material progress of China under the New China concept. The sweeping skyscrapers, the architectural creations of the Olympics and space successes are a wonder to behold! But there are other criteria by which a nation should be judged. Shouldn’t the spiritual and political advancement of the people also have equal importance? If the people are kept in “a gilded cage”, can that be good even though you fill their belly’s and clothe them beautifully? This book is dedicated to stripping away the glitzy exterior and taking a hard look at the sinister interior. President Reagan used the blunt but realistic term “Evil Empire” which is closer to the truth! In this case it is the evil dragon, the Chinese Communist Party, that towers above the law and the Chinese Constitution that is the terrible truth! It has no limits and no purpose in life other than its survival regardless of human cost. In its wake it destroys all human dignity of individual expression in exchange for material wealth. It demands unthinking obedience for the material rewards. But like all Chinese empires in its thousands of years history, a day of retribution will come! When, is anyone’s guess, but some factors that foretell its eventual demise is suggested in this book.
Over the past few decades, alliance and networks have been generally examined individually. This Handbook sheds new light on this research by combining the two topics and focuses on highlighting their similarities. The expert contributors discuss topic
Every year over 200 million peasants flock to China’s urban centers, providing a profusion of cheap labor that helps fuel the country’s staggering economic growth. Award-winning journalist Michelle Dammon Loyalka follows the trials and triumphs of eight such migrants—including a vegetable vendor, an itinerant knife sharpener, a free-spirited recycler, and a cash-strapped mother—offering an inside look at the pain, self-sacrifice, and uncertainty underlying China’s dramatic national transformation. At the heart of the book lies each person’s ability to “eat bitterness”—a term that roughly means to endure hardships, overcome difficulties, and forge ahead. These stories illustrate why China continues to advance, even as the rest of the world remains embroiled in financial turmoil. At the same time, Eating Bitterness demonstrates how dealing with the issues facing this class of people constitutes China’s most pressing domestic challenge.
Are the Chinese really so inscrutable? China Hand Fred Schneiter delves into the lighter side of Chinese psychology, and in doing so demystifies one of the toughest markets in the world. With an unfailing sense of humor, he offers insights for Sinophiles, Sinophobes and everyone in between. On the Hong Kong bestsellers list for twelve months, this book is now back in a new edition—the essential item to pack in your China survival kit.
China is on the verge of a design revolution. A "third generation" of the People's Republic of China that came of age during China's "opening up" period of the 1980s now strives for fame, fortune, and self expression. This generation, workers in their thirties and forties, has more freedom to create--and to consume--than their parents or grandparents. In China's Design Revolution, Lorraine Justice maps the evolution of Chinese design and innovation. Justice explains that just as this "third generation" (post-Revolution, post--Cultural Revolution) reaches for self-expression, China's government is making massive investments in design and innovation, supporting design and creative activities (including design education programs, innovation parks, and privatized companies) at the local and national levels. The goal is to stimulate economic growth--and to establish China as a global creative power. Influenced by Mao and Confucius, communism and capitalism, patriotism and cosmopolitanism, China's third generation will drive the culture of design and innovation in China--and maybe the rest of the world. Justice describes and documents examples of Chinese design and innovation that range from ancient ceramics to communist propaganda posters. She then explores current award-winning projects in media, fashion, graphic, interior, and product design; and examines the lifestyle and purchasing trends of the "fourth generation," now in their teens and twenties. China's Design Revolution offers an essential guide to the inextricably entwined stories of design, culture, and politics in China.
In 1949 Mao Zedong hoisted the red flag over Beijing's Forbidden City. Instead of liberating the country, the communists destroyed the old order and replaced it with a repressive system that would dominate every aspect of Chinese life. In an epic of revolution and violence which draws on newly opened party archives, interviews and memoirs, Frank Dikötter interweaves the stories of millions of ordinary people with the brutal politics of Mao's court. A gripping account of how people from all walks of life were caught up in a tragedy that sent at least five million civilians to their deaths.

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