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Highlighting the words and experiences of 16 mixed race women (who have one white parent and one parent who is a person of color), Silvia Bettez exposes hidden nuances of privilege and oppression related to multiple positionalites associated with race, class, gender and sexuality. These women are “secret agent insiders” to cultural Whiteness who provide unique insights and perspectives that emerge through their mixed race lenses. Much of what the participants share is never revealed in mixed – White/of color – company. Although critical of racial power politics and hierarchies, these women were invested in cross-cultural connections and revealed key insights that can aid all in understanding how to better communicate across lines of cultural difference. This book is an invaluable resource for a wide range of activists, scholars and general readers, including sociologists, sociologists of education, feminists, anti-oppression/social justice scholars, critical multicultural educators, and qualitative researchers who are interested in mixed race issues, cross cultural communication, social justice work, or who simply wish to minimize racial conflict and other forms of oppression. “Theoretically grounded and with vivid detail, this book amplifies the voices of mixed race women to trouble and expand our understandings of race, gender, hybridity and education. Silvia Bettez fills a stark gap in the research literature, and sets the bar high for what comes next.” - Kevin Kumashiro, editor of Troubling Intersections of Race and Sexuality: Queer Students of Color and Anti-Oppressive Education “In But Don’t Call Me White, Silvia Bettez accomplishes the difficult task of presenting complex theories in accessible ways while introducing the reader to the intersectional nature of identities in the 21st century. Through the voices of her participants, Bettez illuminates aspects of gender, race, sexuality and social class that cannot be discerned when examined in isolation, and she does so in an engaging manner. In addition to presenting a model of excellent qualitative research, the book makes a valuable contribution to mixed race studies, gender studies, and education.” - Kristen A. Renn, Associate Professor at Michigan State University “Silvia Bettez has given us a window into lives that are marked by borders of our own racist creations. Yet these women soar and inspire. They are insightful and beautiful. They teach us the limits of racism and the power of a future where race is mezcla not marker. ” - George W. Noblit, Joseph R. Neikirk, Distinguished Professor of Sociology of Education, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Silvia Cristina Bettez teaches about issues of social justice and is an Assistant Professor of Cultural Foundations in the School of Education at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
This volume features scholars who use a critical geography framework to analyze how constructions of social space shape education reform. In particular, they situate their work in present-day neoliberal policies that are pushing responsibility for economic and social welfare, as well as education policy and practice, out of federal and into more local entities. States, cities, and school boards are being given more responsibility and power in determining curriculum content and standards, accompanied by increasing privatization of public education through the rise of charter schools and for-profit organizations’ incursion into managing schools. Given these pressures, critical geography’s unique approach to spatial constructions of schools is crucially important. Reterritorialization and deterritorialization, or the varying flows of people and capital across space and time, are highlighted to understand spatial forces operating on such things as schools, communities, people, and culture. Authors from multiple fields of study contribute to this book’s examination of how social, political, and historical dimensions of spatial forces, especially racial/ethnic and other markers of difference, shape are shaped by processes and outcomes of school reform.
"In this book, Hankivsky considers the implications of this ethic for a range of Canadian social policy issues. Through a series of case studies, she demonstrates the extent to which a care orientation differs from a justice orientation, and provides an alternative normative framework for interpreting, understanding, and evaluating social policy. She reveals why Canadian social policy is lacking and how it could be made more effective and robust by the inclusion of an ethic of care."--Jacket.
Conversations about race can be confusing, contentious, and frightening, particularly for White people. Even just asking questions about race can be scary because we are afraid of what our questions might reveal about our ignorance or bias. Raising Race Questions invites teachers to use inquiry as a way to develop sustained engagement with challenging racial questions and to do so in community so that they learn how common their questions actually are. It lays out both a process for getting to questions that lead to growth and change, as well as a vision for where engagement with race questions might lead. Race questions are not meant to lead us into a quagmire of guilt, discomfort, or isolation. Sustained race inquiry is meant to lead to anti-racist classrooms, positive racial identities, and a restoration of the wholeness of spirit and community that racism undermines. Book Features: Case studies of expert and experienced White teachers who still have questions about race. Approaches for talking about race in the K–12 classroom. Strategies for facilitating race conversations among adults. A variety of different resources useful in the teacher inquiry groups described in the book. Research with teachers, not on teachers, including written responses from each teacher whose classroom is featured in the book. “In Raising Race Questions Ali Michael is an excavator, determined to dig into every unexplored crevice of White teachers’ experiences with race in order to unearth the complex realities of racism and schooling, and a model of reflective inquiry, willing to lay herself and her assumptions bare in service to the reader's consciousness and her own. This book grew my consciousness in multiple ways, and that is the greatest gift an author can give me.” —Paul Gorski, founder, EdChange, associate professor, George Mason University “Ali Michael has a gift for getting people talking. This must-read book captures her ‘magic’ and shares useful strategies for teachers and schools working to develop their racial proficiency. As a White teacher engaged in this work, I've watched these tools help educators support one another as they make mistakes, reflect, and grow together.” —Lynn Eckerman, Teacher, Independence Charter School, Philadelphia, PA
In spite of the double burden of racial and gender discrimination, African-American women have developed a rich intellectual tradition that is not widely known. In Black Feminist Thought, Patricia Hill Collins explores the words and ideas of Black feminist intellectuals as well as those African-American women outside academe. She provides an interpretive framework for the work of such prominent Black feminist thinkers as Angela Davis, bell hooks, Alice Walker, and Audre Lorde. The result is a superbly crafted book that provides the first synthetic overview of Black feminist thought.
In this new and expanded edition of their controversial 1994 book, the authors update their analysis of what's gone wrong with women's studies programs. Their three new chapters provide a devastating and detailed examination of the routine practices found in feminist teaching and research. movement. With close to 700 women's studies programs and departments currently in existence throughout the United States, academic feminism is now a strong presence on college campuses and beyond. But, as Daphne Patai and Noretta Koertge charge, the attempt to make women's studies serve a political agenda has led to deeply problematic results: dubious scholarship, pedagogical practices that resemble indoctrination more than education, and the alienation of countless potential supporters. -professors, students and staffers - who, like themselves, had invested time and effort in women's studies. These individuals speak eloquently of their frustration and even despair over the problems and conflicts they experienced in programs where education was made subservient to politics. Faced with intolerance and ideological policing on the part of both activist colleagues and true-believer students, some of these women withdrew altogether; others, while maintaining their formal association with women's studies, took inner flight. All are troubled and alarmed about the future of feminsm in the academy. To reveal the root causes of these tensions and animosities, Patai and Koertge present an incisive analysis of the self-defeating ideological games feminists play in colleges and universities. programs, attempting to gauge what changes, if any, had occurred since their critique nearly a decade ago. This time they use primarily documents generated from within women's studies itself - program mission statements, course depictions, newsletters, and e-mail lists devoted to feminist pedagogy and women's studies, and, not least, the writings of well-known feminist scholars.

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