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In 1962, The Christian Century published C. S. Lewis's answer to the question, "What books did most to shape your vocational attitude and your philosophy of life?Â?? Lewis responded with ten titles, ranging from Virgil's Aeneid to James Boswell's The Life of Samuel Johnson and from George Herbert's The Temple to Boethius's The Consolation of Philosophy. C. S. Lewis's List brings together experts on each of the ten books to discuss their significance for Lewis's life and work, illuminating his own writing through those he most admired.
In 1962, Christian Century asked C. S. Lewis to name the books that had most influenced his thought. Among those Lewis listed was Theism and Humanism, the published version of Arthur J. Balfour's 1914 Gifford Lectures at the University of Glasgow. Long out of print, the book is now available in this newly typeset and greatly enhanced edition.
Arthur James Balfour (1848 – 1930) served as the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1902 to 1905, but his true love was philosophy. Theism and Humanism (1915) was based on his first series of Gifford Lectures given in 1914. In 1962, writer C. S. Lewis told Christian Century magazine named Theism and Humanism as one of the ten books that had most influenced him.
The Abolition of Man is one of C.S. Lewis’s most important and influential works. In three weighty lectures, given at the height of the Second World War, Lewis defends the objectivity of value, pointing to the universal moral law that all great philosophical and religious traditions have recognized. This critical edition, prepared by Michael Ward, helps readers get the most out of Lewis’s classic work with an introduction placing the book in the context of his life and times; a fully annotated version of the text; a commentary on key passages; and a set of questions for group discussion or individual reflection. Scholarly, detailed, yet accessible, it is the must-have version of an essential volume.
Written after his wife's tragic death as a way of surviving the "mad midnight moment," A Grief Observed is C.S. Lewis's honest reflection on the fundamental issues of life, death, and faith in the midst of loss. This work contains his concise, genuine reflections on that period: "Nothing will shake a man -- or at any rate a man like me -- out of his merely verbal thinking and his merely notional beliefs. He has to be knocked silly before he comes to his senses. Only torture will bring out the truth. Only under torture does he discover it himself." This is a beautiful and unflinchingly homest record of how even a stalwart believer can lose all sense of meaning in the universe, and how he can gradually regain his bearings.
The Abolition of Man is one of C.S. Lewis's most important and influential works. In three weighty lectures, given at the height of the Second World War, Lewis defends the objectivity of value, pointing to the universal moral law that all great philosophical and religious traditions have recognized. This critical edition, prepared by Michael Ward, helps readers get the most out of Lewis's classic work with an introduction placing the book in the context of his life and times; a fully annotated version of the text; a commentary on key passages; and a set of questions for group discussion or individual reflection. Scholarly, detailed, yet accessible, it is the must-have version of an essential volume.
On the fiftieth anniversary of his death, C. S. Lewis was memorialized in Poets’ Corner, Westminster Abbey, taking his place beside the greatest names in English literature. Oxford and Cambridge Universities, where Lewis taught, also held commemorations. This volume gathers together addresses from those events. Rowan Williams and Alister McGrath assess Lewis’s legacy in theology, Malcolm Guite addresses his integration of reason and imagination, William Lane Craig takes a philosophical perspective, while Lewis’s successor as Professor of Medieval and Renaissance English, Helen Cooper, considers him as a critic. The collection also includes more personal and creative responses: Walter Hooper, Lewis’s biographer, recalls their first meeting; there are poems, essays, a panel discussion, and even a report by the famous “Mystery Worshipper” from the Ship of Fools website, along with a moving reaction by Royal Wedding composer Paul Mealor about how he set one of Lewis’s poems to music. Containing theology, literary criticism, poetry, memoir, and much else besides, this volume reflects the breadth of Lewis’s interests and the astonishing variety of his own output: a diverse and colorful commemoration of an extraordinary man.

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