Download Free Captivity 118 Days In Iraq And The Struggle For A World Without War Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Captivity 118 Days In Iraq And The Struggle For A World Without War and write the review.

The powerful account of the remarkable peace activist kidnapped while leading a peace delegation and held for ransom by Iraqi insurgents until his paradoxical release by a crack unit of special forces commandos. In November 2005, James Loney and three other men -- Canadian Harmeet Singh Sooden, British citizen Norman Kember and American Tom Fox -- were taken hostage at gunpoint. The men were with Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT), an organization that places teams trained in non-violent intervention into lethal conflict zones. The then unknown Swords of Righteousness Brigade released videos of the men, resulting in what is likely the most publicized kidnapping of the Iraq War. Tom Fox was murdered and dumped on a Baghdad street. The surviving men were held for 118 days before being rescued by Task Force Black, an elite counter-kidnap unit led by the British SAS. Captivity is the story of what Jim described upon his return to Toronto and reunion with his partner Dan Hunt as "a terrifying, profound, transformative and excruciatingly boring experience." It presents an affecting portrait of how Jim came to be a pacifist and chronicles his work in Iraq before the kidnapping. It brings the reader immediately into the terror and banality, the frictions, the moral dilemmas of their captivity, their search to find their captors' humanity, and the imperative need to conceal Jim's sexual identity. It examines the paradoxes we face when our most cherished principles are tested in extraordinary circumstances and explores the universal truths contained in every captivity experience. At its heart, the book is a hope-filled plea for peace, human solidarity and forgiveness. From James Loney: Why I Wrote This Book I often wondered, during those excruciating days of handcuffs and chains, fear and boredom without end, would I ever get to tell anyone about the strange and bizarre things that happened during our captivity? Being transported in the trunk of a car. Sleeping with my left and right hands handcuffed to the person beside me. Explaining to the captors how to use "men's gel." Picking open our handcuffs after watching a Hollywood movie. It is a paradox. I went to Iraq as a pacifi st on a mission of peace and was kidnapped, threatened with death and held hostage with three other men until we were rescued in a military operation. It is an extraordinary privilege to be able to tell the story of this paradox, to explain why I remain committed to the principles of nonviolence despite the fact a member of our group was murdered and our freedom was secured by armed force. The crucible of captivity was a kind of school in which I was able to see the innermost workings of the universe, how we are all connected, how our liberation is inextricably tied together. I want to share this story in the hope of contributing to the emergence of a world without war, the single greatest challenge of the 21st century. Everything depends on this, for without peace nothing else is possible. From the Hardcover edition.
Through Iraqis' eyes--through their stories--this book "tells the truth" about what war and the U.S. government's antiterrorism policies have really meant for them. Iraqis recount the abuses they experienced in the U.S. and new Iraqi detention systems, the excessive violence, and collective punishment of the U.S.-led occupying forces, as well as tensions between Kurds and Arab Iraqis--tensions rooted in Saddam Hussein's genocide against the Kurds. Stories coming out of Iraq between 2004 and 2011 also describe the efforts of courageous and creative Iraqis speaking out against injustices and building movements of nonviolence and reconciliation. We also get a glimpse of how the author, a peace-worker, immersed in the violence and chaos of war, dealt with the pain and suffering of those around her, as well as her own personal losses and kidnapping ordeal. Her experiences strengthen her belief that the power of nonviolent suffering love (the way of Jesus) is stronger than the power of violence and force, and can break down barriers and be transformative in threatening situations. She counters the myths of the superiority of violent force to root out evil in places such as Iraq and challenges us to do all we can to prevent the tragedy of any future war.
Liberating Biblical Study is a unique collaboration of pioneering biblical scholars, social-change activists, and movement-based artists. Well known and unknown, veterans and newcomers, these diverse practitioners of justice engage in a lively and critical conversation at the intersection of seminary, sanctuary, and street. The book is divided into eight sections; in each, a scholar, activist, and artist explore the justice issues related to a biblical text or idea, such as exodus, creation, jubilee, and sanctuary. Beyond the emerging themes (e.g., empire, resistance movements, identity, race, gender, and economics), the book raises essential questions at another level: What is the role of art in social-change movements? How can scholars be accountable beyond the academy, and activists encouraged to study? How are resistance movements nurtured and sustained? This volume is an accessible invitation to action that will appeal to all who love and strive for justice--whatever their discipline, and whatever their familiarity with the Bible, scholarship, art, and activist communities.
Written by a former hostage negotiator, Taken Hostage provides specific daily behavioral, situational, and long-term psychological strategies used successfully by hostages who survived months and years of mental and physical torture by terrorists, religious extremists, and criminal gangs. The book describes in detail the five stages of a hostage taking. Whether taken hostage for ransom, political leverage, or as a human shield, the book suggests what treatment the hostage can expect during each stage and how to best counter them. Taken Hostage describes how a hostage can moderate the physical and mental effects caused by physical tortures such as binding, suspension, beatings, starvation, and sexual assault and against mental tortures such as social deprivation, false executions, and brainwashing. The book identifies the mental hazards of depression, suicide, and barbed-wire psychosis and how to combat them. Particular strategies such as passive compliance and humanizing will instruct the hostage on how to apply recognized psychological strategies to the hostages advantage, and as such, play a more active role in their day-to-day physical treatment and sustain positive mental health. The book stresses safer travel planning as the most important strategy against being kidnapped in the first place. It details hotel security, insider accomplices, finding the right hotel and the right taxi, and how to use countersurveillance techniques to identify and thwart a potential kidnapping. The book coaches the hostages family and employers back home how to effectively manage the media and one another, thereby reducing the incidence of hostage and family PTSD and reintegrating a changed person back into their changed family. The detailed survival strategies will inspire a hostages will to live and sustain a familys hope. It is written for domestic and international travelers, UN and NGO volunteers, military personnel, and anyone in harms way.
Jesus Loves Women is the memoir of a girl raised in a fundamentalist Christian milieu she casts off at a young age and of her quest to find wholeness and home, spiritually and sexually.Richard Rohr, O.F.M., Center for Action and Contemplation, Albuquerque, New Mexico; and author, Falling Upward, puts it this way: "Finally, the body is getting its due as the normal and gifted vehicle for Spirit! It has taken us a long time to realize the Christian obvious, and Tricia Gates Brown is making it both more obvious and thoroughly Christian." In his foreword, James Loney, Author of Captivity: 118 Days in Iraq and the Struggle for a World Without War, comments that "Jesus Loves Women is a story of grace, of how through the healing beauty of the Pacific coast and the friendship of a Trappist monk, Tricia awakens to a mystical understanding of God's unconditional love. It is the story of how one woman finds freedom from the shame, social conventions, and religious pieties that constrict the lives of all women." Susan Mark Landis, former Minister of Peace and Justice, Mennonite Church USA, says that "Like a late night talk with my best friend, Tricia's book gave me intimate insights into her life, my life, and God's love for us. Her fresh, rich words draw me to examine my life and God's movement through it. By openly sharing the secrets we typically hide, she invites us to give ourselves the grace God does and to journey toward unreserved living and loving." Brian Doyle, Author of the novel Mink River, views Brown as "An honest, piercing, blunt, lyrical, remarkable writer about the endless chambers of joy and pain in the heart."
On November 26, 2005 Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) members Tom Fox and Jim Loney along with delegation members Norman Kember and Harmeet Sooden were kidnapped in Iraq. Tom Fox was killed on March 9, 2006. Jim, Norman and Harmeet were freed two weeks later on March 23 after 118 days of captivity. The kidnapping of these four men was like a rock thrown into a pond. This book describes the ripples on the water, the impact and results of that rock. Ripples in the lives of CPT teams and the communities in which they work. Ripples among families and friends of those taken. Ripples across the world in faith communities, prisons, in the media and among their audiences, and in the lives of the four men. Dozens of Muslim leaders who knew CPT's peacemaking work courageously called for the release of the CPT delegation. Christian leaders in turn called for justice for the 14,000 Iraqis held by Multinational Forces in Iraq without charges or access to their families.
WINNER OF THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE In this intimate memoir of survival, a former captive of the Islamic State tells her harrowing and ultimately inspiring story. Nadia Murad was born and raised in Kocho, a small village of farmers and shepherds in northern Iraq. A member of the Yazidi community, she and her brothers and sisters lived a quiet life. Nadia had dreams of becoming a history teacher or opening her own beauty salon. On August 15th, 2014, when Nadia was just twenty-one years old, this life ended. Islamic State militants massacred the people of her village, executing men who refused to convert to Islam and women too old to become sex slaves. Six of Nadia’s brothers were killed, and her mother soon after, their bodies swept into mass graves. Nadia was taken to Mosul and forced, along with thousands of other Yazidi girls, into the ISIS slave trade. Nadia would be held captive by several militants and repeatedly raped and beaten. Finally, she managed a narrow escape through the streets of Mosul, finding shelter in the home of a Sunni Muslim family whose eldest son risked his life to smuggle her to safety. Today, Nadia's story—as a witness to the Islamic State's brutality, a survivor of rape, a refugee, a Yazidi—has forced the world to pay attention to an ongoing genocide. It is a call to action, a testament to the human will to survive, and a love letter to a lost country, a fragile community, and a family torn apart by war.

Best Books

DMCA - Contact