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Now with a new afterword, the Pulitzer Prize-winning dramatic account of the civil rights era’s climactic battle in Birmingham as the movement, led by Martin Luther King, Jr., brought down the institutions of segregation. "The Year of Birmingham," 1963, was a cataclysmic turning point in America’s long civil rights struggle. Child demonstrators faced down police dogs and fire hoses in huge nonviolent marches against segregation. Ku Klux Klansmen retaliated by bombing the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, killing four young black girls. Diane McWhorter, daughter of a prominent Birmingham family, weaves together police and FBI records, archival documents, interviews with black activists and Klansmen, and personal memories into an extraordinary narrative of the personalities and events that brought about America’s second emancipation. In a new afterword—reporting last encounters with hero Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth and describing the current drastic anti-immigration laws in Alabama—the author demonstrates that Alabama remains a civil rights crucible.
Valeria würde niemals pfeifen. Sie ist nicht mehr jung und hat dezidierte Anschauungen über die Menschen und das Leben. Das Gemüse auf dem Markt ist nicht knackig genug, die Bauern, die um Ibolya in ihrer immer geöffneten Kneipe herumscharwenzeln, sind so nichtsnutzig wie die Christdemokraten, die protzigen Kapitalisten und dieser linke Schimpanse von einem Bürgermeister mit seiner langbeinigen, kapriziösen Frau. Alle sind sie stillos. So wie Menschen, die pfeifen. Doch als sie sich in den Töpfer des kleinen ungarischen Dorfes verliebt, gerät alles durcheinander. Das eigene und das Leben der anderen.
Sensationeller Manuskriptfund - das literarische Ereignis im Sommer 2015 Harper Lee hat bisher nur einen Roman veröffentlicht, doch dieser hat der US-amerikanischen Schriftstellerin Weltruhm eingebracht: „Wer die Nachtigall stört“, erschienen 1960 und ein Jahr später mit dem renommierten Pulitzer-Preis ausgezeichnet, ist mit 40 Millionen verkauften Exemplaren und Übersetzungen in mehr als 40 Sprachen eines der meistgelesenen Bücher weltweit. Mit „Gehe hin, stelle einen Wächter“ – zeitlich vor „Wer die Nachtigall stört“ entstanden – erscheint nun das Erstlingswerk. Das Manuskript wurde nie veröffentlicht und galt als verschollen – bis es eine Freundin der inzwischen 89-jährigen Autorin im September 2014 fand. In „Gehe hin, stelle einen Wächter“ treffen wir die geliebten Charaktere aus „Wer die Nachtigall stört“ wieder, 20 Jahre später: Eine inzwischen erwachsene Jean Louise Finch, „Scout“, kehrt zurück nach Maycomb und sieht sich in der kleinen Stadt in Alabama, die sie so geprägt hat, mit gesellschaftspolitischen Problemen konfrontiert, die nicht zuletzt auch ihr Verhältnis zu ihrem Vater Atticus infrage stellen. Ein Roman über die turbulenten Ereignisse im Amerika der 1950er-Jahre, der zugleich ein faszinierend neues Licht auf den Klassiker wirft. Bewegend, humorvoll und überwältigend – ein Roman, der seinem Vorgänger in nichts nachsteht.
One of Planetizen’s Top Ten Books of 2006 "But for Birmingham," Fred Shuttleworth recalled President John F. Kennedy saying in June 1963 when he invited black leaders to meet with him, "we would not be here today." Birmingham is well known for its civil rights history, particularly for the violent white-on-black bombings that occurred there in the 1960s, resulting in the city’s nickname "Bombingham." What is less well known about Birmingham’s racial history, however, is the extent to which early city planning decisions influenced and prompted the city’s civil rights protests. The first book-length work to analyze this connection, "The Most Segregated City in America": City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920–1980 uncovers the impact of Birmingham’s urban planning decisions on its black communities and reveals how these decisions led directly to the civil rights movement. Spanning over sixty years, Charles E. Connerly’s study begins in the 1920s, when Birmingham used urban planning as an excuse to implement racial zoning laws, pointedly sidestepping the 1917 U.S. Supreme Court Buchanan v. Warley decision that had struck down racial zoning. The result of this obstruction was the South’s longest-standing racial zoning law, which lasted from 1926 to 1951, when it was redeclared unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court. Despite the fact that African Americans constituted at least 38 percent of Birmingham’s residents, they faced drastic limitations to their freedom to choose where to live. When in the1940s they rebelled by attempting to purchase homes in off-limit areas, their efforts were labeled as a challenge to city planning, resulting in government and court interventions that became violent. More than fifty bombings ensued between 1947 and 1966, becoming nationally publicized only in 1963, when four black girls were killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Connerly effectively uses Birmingham’s history as an example to argue the importance of recognizing the link that exists between city planning and civil rights. His demonstration of how Birmingham’s race-based planning legacy led to the confrontations that culminated in the city’s struggle for civil rights provides a fresh lens on the history and future of urban planning, and its relation to race.
An education leader relates how his experiences with the civil rights movement led him to develop programs promoting educational success in science and technology for African Americans and others. In Holding Fast to Dreams, 2018 American Council on Education (ACE) Lifetime Achievement Award winner Freeman Hrabowski recounts his journey as an educator, a university president, and a pioneer in developing successful, holistic programs for high-achieving students of all races. When Hrabowski was twelve years old, a civil rights leader visited his Birmingham, Alabama, church and spoke about a children’s march for civil rights and opportunity. That leader was the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr., and that march changed Hrabowski’s life. Until then, Freeman was a kid who loved school and solving math problems. Although his family had always stressed the importance of education, he never expected that the world might change and that black and white students would one day study together. But hearing King speak changed everything for Hrabowski, who convinced his parents that he needed to answer King’s call to stand up for equality. While participating in the famed Children’s Crusade, he spent five terrifying nights in jail—during which Freeman became a leader for the younger kids, as he learned about the risk and sacrifice that it would take to fight for justice. Hrabowski went on to fuse his passion for education and for equality, as he made his life’s work inspiring high academic achievement among students of all races in science and engineering. It also brought him from Birmingham to Baltimore, where he has been president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County for more than two decades. While at UMBC, he co-founded the Meyerhoff Scholars Program, which has been one of the most successful programs for educating African Americans who go on to earn doctorates in the STEM disciplines.
"Explores and analyzes the historical context and significance of the iconic Charles Moore photograph"--Provided by publisher.

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