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Eighteen case studies capture important issues within the IDEA and NCLB legislations and provide real-life context for studying special education and the law. Topics include accountability; participation in high stakes assessment; the referral and prereferral process; zero reject, child find and discipline; nondiscriminatory assessment; appropriate education and IEPs; least restrictive environment; due process; and parent participation. Readers will see a variety of students, issues and interventions (both best practice and less than best practice) and have opportunities to examine the legal issues and other issues behind each case.
Special education law and practice have undergone profound transformation over the past 50 years. Students with disabilities are now more likely to receive a free and appropriate education in the least restrictive environment possible; however, the ideals of the law have not always been manifested in effective practice. Although special education services are vastly better today than they were in the early years of public education, current policies and practices continue to result in the under-education of many children with disabilities. This book illustrates key failures of the system within the context of real children’s experiences. The case study approach gives voice to the students, families, and educators who have been let down by the special education process. The goal is to shed light on the flaws and injustices of the status quo. After identifying these problems, the authors offer sound solutions. Section 1 is devoted to issues surrounding identification of students with learning disabilities. These topics include occurrence of inconsistencies in assessment and diagnoses, understanding the struggles of the “slow learner,” and the interference of behavioral challenges with students’ educational performance. Section 2 addresses problems within the evaluation process that negatively influence diagnoses. Discussions include disproportionate representation of students from low socioeconomic backgrounds as well as students of color and bilingual students. Section 3 highlights significant concerns with service provision within the special education realm. The narratives throughout the book present stories of children on the receiving end of a severely fractured special education system. Recommendations focus on solving specific problems, such as inconsistent identification processes and categories, disproportionate representation, ill-conceived IEPs, ineffective specially designed instruction, and poorly implemented RTI programs. The book’s methodological approach affirms that there is much room for reform within both the special education system and the public education system as a whole. This book will be an excellent resource for graduate-level students, practitioners, and teachers in the fields of special education, disability studies, early intervention, school psychology, and child and family services. Additionally, it will be of interest to social workers, counselors, and researchers.
Before the passage of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act in 1975, U.S. students with physical and learning disabilities frequently went undiagnosed, received inadequate treatment, or were even barred from attending school. And until recently, traditional measures of learning disability were often too crude to separate the learning-disabled student from students having academic difficulties due to other reasons, such as emotional issues or language problems. Grigorenko's new book discusses how learning-disabled students are identified and assessed today, in light of the 2004 Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act. One of the major changes in IDEIA 2004, for instance, is the "Response to Intervention" (RTI) provision, which allows school districts to better identify students with legitimate learning disabilities and provide them with individualized, evidence-based instruction. Grigorenko's interdisciplinary collection is the first to comprehensively review the IDEIA 2004 Act and distill the changes professionals working with learning-disabled students face. The text takes an overarching perspective, first discussing the IDEIA in its historical, political, and legal context, then covering practical issues professionals address on a daily basis. Educating Individuals with Disabilities is a priceless resource for school psychologists, neuropsychologists, speech-language therapists, administrators, policy makers, and legal professionals who navigate special education and learning disability issues on a daily basis.
The belief that regular and special education administrators should work together to create and maintain successful education programs for all students is not new, nor is the assumption that administrator preparation programs should foster the development of an inclusive approach—yet this critical educational partnership has not reached its full potential. Despite the lack of agreement within the federal legislative branch on exactly what should be changed within our education system, some promising points of consensus have emerged: competitive grants, college and career readiness, multi-tiered systems of support, common core standards, a rewards-based (rather than punitive) system for school improvement, the critical role of effective teachers and principals, increased school choice options, and evidence-based learning strategies, particularly in high-need schools. The third edition stresses the importance of these key points. Each chapter features case studies that simulate real-life situations readers are likely to encounter in their careers as administrators. Within the safety of the classroom, they will rehearse controversial scenarios involving inclusive school governance, school reform, identification and placement, conflict resolution, program evaluation, fiscal issues, transportation, and discipline. Enhanced practice situations and role-play exercises emphasize the special education administrator’s role in resolving difficult situations. The case-study approach is an effective learning tool for aspiring special and regular education administrators and instructors alike, fostering enthusiastic classroom discussion and critical thinking about potential solutions to today’s complex problems in inclusive educational administration.
This second edition is a major revision and update of Rehabilitation and Disability: Psychosocial Case Studies. The role and function of the rehabilitation counselor is described relative to the principles and practices of case management in the vocational rehabilitation process. The first chapter describes landmark legislation that has ensured the human and civil rights of persons with disabilities. The author relates changes to those of the consumerism movement, as persons with disabilities move from passive recipients of services to active participants capable of steering their own future, choosing their jobs and environments. Assessment as a best practice has expanded from being agency-oriented to being person-oriented. In addition to the use of best practices, the author advocates the use of best values to serve as the decision-making foundation for the application of best practices. Values can be the standards that guide the entire rehabilitation service delivery process, including the formulation of objectives, the search for alternatives, and the choices among them. The goal is for the client to realize the American Dream. The first two parts of the text provide a person-based philosophy and a substantial knowledge base in case management, and the thirteen case studies in the third part allow the reader to investigate the use of best practices and best values in case management. An outstanding group of contributors was selected to author various chapters. Their collective achievements have included agency-executive leadership, university professorships and consultative activities at the state, national, and international levels. Each contributor, as well, has made significant scholarly contributions to the rehabilitation literature. While the text was developed primarily for use in graduate rehabilitation counseling programs, it has great utility for related academic programs in allied health, psychology, social sciences, and special education. The text, also, has practical value for in-service and short term training anywhere that the vocational rehabilitation process can be facilitated from a client-centered perspective.
Prepare your students for clinical interactions with this one-of-a-kind guide! Special education and speech/language therapy students need to know how to apply their knowledge in practical settings to effectively prepare for and practice in their future careers as professionals. The use of case studies in this text will allow students to discuss and apply their knowledge in controlled settings to prepare them for real-life clinical applications. The problem-based instruction format is the best method for building students' knowledge while enhancing critical thinking skills in preliminary application situations. This book provides informational chapters containing overview information related to speech and language development and speech and language disorders followed by transcribed real-life case studies of both typical and atypical speech and language development. When possible, the companion audio or visual recordings provide additional information to the transcribed examples. By reading transcribed conversations of students at various ages, readers will be able to identify components of language development as well as intricate issues that may arise when a disorder is present. Every student should have this book!

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