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Every year, hundreds of thousands of healthy volunteers and patients worldwide undertake the journey through the maze that can be clinical trials. Research participants take part in clinical trials for a variety of reasons. The healthy volunteers may be seeking extra money to pay off college tuition, or they may know someone who is suffering and would potentially benefit from the results of the trial. The patient who is terminally ill might participate in a clinical trial simply as a last hope for a cure. Whatever the goals, though, most participants will experience the same sense of bewilderment as they encounter the jargon and medical terminology that they will hear and have to read about and understand during the course of the clinical trial. Clinical Trials: What Patients and Volunteers Need to Know demystifies the entire process, focusing on the process of drug development, and the clinical trial itself. Writing from a lifetime of experience, the author provides important questions to ask those running a clinical trial, key definitions and terms for a participant to know and understand, as well as anecdotes illustrating the clinical trial process. The author also grapples with the idea of "informed consent," providing mechanisms for patients and volunteers to feel fully informed before signing up for the trial. A vital resource for those who are considering enrolling in a clinical trial, or for the parents, friends, or relatives of those involved in a clinical trial, this book takes away the mystery and allows the participant to enter a clinical trial feeling both informed and confident.
Every year, hundreds of thousands of healthy volunteers and patients worldwide undertake the journey through the maze that can be clinical trials. Research participants take part in clinical trials for a variety of reasons. The healthy volunteers may be seeking extra money to pay off college tuition, or they may know someone who is suffering and would potentially benefit from the results of the trial. The patient who is terminally ill might participate in a clinical trial simply as a last hope for a cure. Whatever the goals, though, most participants will experience the same sense of bewilderment as they encounter the jargon and medical terminology that they will hear and have to read about and understand during the course of the clinical trial. Clinical Trials: What Patients and Volunteers Need to Know demystifies the entire process, focusing on the process of drug development, and the clinical trial itself. Writing from a lifetime of experience, the author provides important questions to ask those running a clinical trial, key definitions and terms for a participant to know and understand, as well as anecdotes illustrating the clinical trial process. The author also grapples with the idea of "informed consent," providing mechanisms for patients and volunteers to feel fully informed before signing up for the trial. A vital resource for those who are considering enrolling in a clinical trial, or for the parents, friends, or relatives of those involved in a clinical trial, this book takes away the mystery and allows the participant to enter a clinical trial feeling both informed and confident.
This book provides a richly detailed contribution to the understanding of healthy volunteer experiences in clinical drug trials in the UK. Contemporary society, especially the West, has seen a significant increase in the production and use of pharmaceutical products, particularly for disease treatment. However, despite the large numbers of people involved, particularly in the UK, very little is known about their experiences in commercial phase I clinical drug trials. Shadreck Mwale critiques common conceptions of the terms ‘volunteer’ and ‘altruism’ as used in policy and practice of human involvement in clinical trials and calls for an awareness of the complexity of the terms and how the social contexts participants find themselves in shape acts of voluntarism. Based on extensive empirical evidence and conceptual analysis, the book presents new insights into the lives of healthy volunteers, challenges bioethical conceptions and generates new frameworks for policy and practice of FIHCTs. It will be of particular interest to scholars and practitioners in the wider social sciences, medical Sociology and medical anthropology, pharmacology and bioethics.
Informed consent (Medical law).
This publication aims to provide answers to some of the many questions which people affected by cancer may have about clinical trials. It should prove particularly useful for the patient who may be asked to enter a trial.
The Oxford Textbook of Palliative Social Work is a comprehensive, evidence-informed text that addresses the needs of professionals who provide interdisciplinary, culturally sensitive, biopsychosocial-spiritual care for patients and families living with life-threatening illness. Social workers from diverse settings will benefit from its international scope and wealth of patient and family narratives. Unique to this scholarly text is its emphasis on the collaborative nature inherent in palliative care. This definitive resource is edited by two leading palliative social work pioneers who bring together an array of international authors who provide clinicians, researchers, policy-makers, and academics with a broad range of content to enrich the guidelines recommended by the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care.
This book is published under a CC BY 4.0 license. This book provides original, up-to-date case studies of “ethics dumping” that were largely facilitated by loopholes in the ethics governance of low and middle-income countries. It is instructive even to experienced researchers since it provides a voice to vulnerable populations from the fore mentioned countries. Ensuring the ethical conduct of North-South collaborations in research is a process fraught with difficulties. The background conditions under which such collaborations take place include extreme differentials in available income and power, as well as a past history of colonialism, while differences in culture can add a new layer of complications. In this context, up-to-date case studies of unethical conduct are essential for research ethics training.
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