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This best-selling classic work shows how psychotherapists can effectively treat depressive disorders. Case examples illustrate a wide range of strategies and techniques.
- Winner of the American Journal of Nursing Book of the Year Award - Mental Health Nursing! Aaron T. Beck - Winner of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Nursing Centers Consortium! Updating and reformulating Aaron T. Beck's pioneering cognitive model of anxiety disorders, this book is both authoritative and highly practical. The authors synthesize the latest thinking and empirical data on anxiety treatment and offer step-by-step instruction in cognitive assessment, case formulation, cognitive restructuring, and behavioral intervention. They provide evidence-based mini-manuals for treating the five most common anxiety disorders: panic disorder, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive “compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. User-friendly features include vivid case examples, concise "Clinician Guidelines" that reinforce key points, and over three dozen reproducible handouts and forms.
In this profound work, Vittorio Guidano expands upon his earlier seminal contributions on the application of cognitive and developmental principles to individuals struggling with various forms of psychopathology. Here, he fully develops the idea that individuals' experience, both positive and negative, are powerfully influenced by their personal ``psychological organizations.'Focusing primarily on the eating disorders, the phobias (with agoraphobia as the prototype) obsessive-compulsive patterns, and depression, Guidano illustrates how early developmental experiences and ongoing psychological processes may collude to perpetuate dysfunctional patterns and personal distress. The central and perhaps most exciting thesis in this new expression of Guidano's thinking is that the ``deep structure' or ``core organizing processes`` that constrain human psychological experience may be at the heart of successful intervention as well as the classical problems of resistance, relapse, and refractory behaviors. Guidano's contention is at once simple and powerful: those psychological processes involved in the development and maintenance of personal identity, or ``self' that should be the primary foci of research and intervention in psychological disorders. The meaning of Guidano's perspective for clinical practice is perhaps best expressed in the author's own words: ``Knowing the basic elements of the personal cognitive organization that underlie the pattern of disturbed behavior and emotions, the therapist can behave, from the beginning, in such a way as to build a relationship as effective as possible for that particular client. In other words, the therapist should be able to establish a relationship that respects the client's personal identity and systemic coherence and that, at the same time, does not confirm the basic pathogenic assumptions. For example, in working with agoraphobics, the therapist has to respect their self-images centered on the need to be in control. He/she can do this by avoiding any direct attack on their controlling attitudes and by leaving them a wide margin of control in the relationship. At the same time the therapist should avoid confirming their assumptions about the somatic origin of their emotional disturbances or about their inborn fragility. In short, the therapist who can anticipate the models of self and reality tacitly entertained by the client is surely better able to help the development of a cooperative and secure therapeutic relationship than the therapist who cannot make such anticipations. This timely and provocative volume offers exciting new ideas about how to conceptualize and facilitate change in the ``self system.' With the rare combination of his Renaissance intellect and integrative practical expertise, Guidano has been able to draw together many disparate themes from object relations theory, ego psychology, attachment theory, constructivist models of human cognition, and lifespan developmental psychology. It is must reading for the practicing professional, the helping apprentice, and anyone interested in glimpsing the cutting edge at the growing interface between cognitive and clinical science.
Is the emotionally disturbed person a victim of forces beyond his awareness, over which he has no control? This is the belief on which neuropsychiatry, psychoanalysis, and behavior therapy are all based. But what if this premise is wrong? What if a person’s psychological difficulties stem from his own erroneous assumptions and faulty concepts of himself and the world? Such a person can be helped to recognize and correct distortions in thinking that cause his emotional disturbance. Now one of the founders of cognitive therapy has written a clear, comprehensive guide to its theory and practice, highlighting such important concepts as: · Learning the meaning of hidden messages · Listening to your automatic thoughts · The role of sadness, anger, and anxiety · Understanding and overcoming phobias and depression · Applying the cognitive system of therapy to specific problems “A book by a significant contributor to our knowledge… immensely readable, logical, and coherent… This is Beck at his best.”—Psychiatry From the Trade Paperback edition.
More than forty years ago, Dr. Aaron T. Beck's pioneering Depression: Causes and Treatment presented the first comprehensive account of all aspects of depression and introduced cognitive therapy to health care providers and patients struggling with one of the most common and devastating diseases of the modern age. Since that classic text first appeared, the appreciation of the multifaceted nature of mood disorders has grown, and the phenomenological and biological aspects of psychology are increasingly seen as intertwined. Taking these developments into account, Beck and his colleague Brad A. Alford have written a second edition of Depression that will help patients and caregivers understand depression as a cognitive disorder. The new edition of Depression builds on the original research and approach of the seminal first edition, including the tests of Freud's theory that led to a new system of psychological theory and therapy, one that addresses the negative schema and automatic thoughts that can trap people in painful emotional states. Beck and Alford examine selected scientific tests and randomized controlled trials that have enhanced the cognitive approach since the time it was first introduced. Incorporating accepted changes in the definitions and categories of the various mood disorders into its discussion, Depression addresses the treatment role of revolutionary drugs, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in relation to cognitive approaches. Beck and Alford explore research on neurotrophic and neurogenesis theories of depression. They also report on advances in psychosocial treatment of depression, including the value of cognitive therapy in the prevention of relapse.
This clinical reference and widely adopted text is recognized as the premier guide to understanding and treating frequently encountered psychological disorders in adults. Showcasing evidence-based psychotherapy models, the volume addresses the most pressing question asked by students and practitioners--"How do I do it?" Leading authorities present state-of-the-art information on each clinical problem and explain the conceptual and empirical bases of their respective therapeutic approaches. Procedures for assessment, case formulation, treatment planning, and intervention are described in detail. Extended case examples with session transcripts illustrate each component of treatment. New to This Edition *Incorporates treatment innovations, the latest empirical findings, and changes to diagnostic criteria in DSM-5. *Chapter on acceptance-based treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. *Chapter on comorbid depression and substance abuse, demonstrating a transdiagnostic approach. *Chapter on sleep disorders.
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