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In this comparative-historical analysis of Spanish America, Mahoney offers a new theory of colonialism and postcolonial development. He explores why certain kinds of societies are subject to certain kinds of colonialism and why these forms of colonialism give rise to countries with differing levels of economic prosperity and social well-being. Mahoney contends that differences in the extent of colonialism are best explained by the potentially evolving fit between the institutions of the colonizing nation and those of the colonized society. Moreover, he shows how institutions forged under colonialism bring countries to relative levels of development that may prove remarkably enduring in the postcolonial period. The argument is sure to stir discussion and debate, both among experts on Spanish America who believe that development is not tightly bound by the colonial past, and among scholars of colonialism who suggest that the institutional identity of the colonizing nation is of little consequence.
Despite their many similarities, Central American countries during the twentieth century were characterized by remarkably different political regimes. In a comparative analysis of Guatemala, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Honduras, and Nicaragua, James Mahoney argues that these political differences were legacies of the nineteenth-century liberal reform period. Presenting a theory of "path dependence," Mahoney shows how choices made at crucial turning points in Central American history established certain directions of change and foreclosed others to shape long-term development. By the middle of the twentieth century, three types of political regimes characterized the five nations considered in this study: military-authoritarian (Guatemala, El Salvador), liberal democratic (Costa Rica), and traditional dictatorial (Honduras, Nicaragua). As Mahoney shows, each type is the end point of choices regarding state and agrarian development made by these countries early in the nineteenth century. Applying his conclusions to present-day attempts at market creation in a neoliberal era, Mahoney warns that overzealous pursuit of market creation can have severely negative long-term political consequences. The Legacies of Liberalism presents new insight into the role of leadership in political development, the place of domestic politics in the analysis of foreign intervention, and the role of the state in the creation of early capitalism. The book offers a general theoretical framework that will be of broad interest to scholars of comparative politics and political development, and its overall argument will stir debate among historians of particular Central American countries.
"Timothy Frye's Building States and Markets After Communism is a superb addition to the growing literature on the political economy of postcommunism. Frye develops a powerful and original model to explain the level of comprehensiveness and coherence of economic reform in 25 postcommunist countries. Frye subjects his theory to a variety of empirical tests, using evidence from surveys of business people in the region, data on economic performance, and thorough case studies of Russia, Bulgaria, Poland, and Uzbekistan. Written in a clear and accessible style, the book will stand as an authoritative analysis of the political and economic development of the postcommunist region."- Thomas F. Remington, Emory University "Frye's account of the diverse fortunes of postcommunist states distinguishes itself through attention to a critical intervening political mechanism: the greater or lesser partisan polarization around questions of economic reform that shapes the behavior of politicians, economic producers, and voters in the postcommunist polity. Frye also explains how polarization comes about, is reproduced at the micro-level in the investment behavior of firms, and persists overtime. Such quantitative analysis is complemented by meticulous case studies highlighting the empirics of centrifugal and centripetal political competition and its political-economic consequences. This carefully crafted investigation will command the attention of anyone who plans to study the political economy of postcommunism."- Herbert Kitschelt, Duke University Tim Frye's book provides a major new perspective on the political economy of investment and growth in the countries of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. His analysis of the effects of party system polarization pushes well beyond earlier theories of partial and inconsistent market reforms. His theoretical claims are built on an impressive combination of econometric analysis, original survey research, and new case studies. This ground-breaking study makes a significant contribution to our understanding of postsocialist countries and will be an important point of reference for analyses of economic reform in other parts of the developing world."- Robert Kaufman, Rutgers University "Drawing on his deep knowledge of the postcommunist experience, Tim Frye demonstrates that history can overwhelm attempts to get the institutions right. Conceptually bold and meticulously researched, Building States and Markets After Communism should be read by anybody who wants to understand the political economy of economic reform."- ScottGehlbach, University ofWisconsin, Madison "Timothy Frye makes a signal contribution to the study of Eastern Europe and Central Asia, and to the political economy of reform, with this study of how political polarization explains the distinct patterns of economic reform and growth since the fall of communism."- Philip Keefer, Development Research Group, The World Bank.
The essays in this book contribute to emerging debates in political science and sociology on institutional change, providing a theoretical framework and empirical applications.
Across the world, welfare states are under challenge (or were never developed extensively in the first place) while non-state actors increasingly provide public goods and basic welfare. In many parts of the Middle East and South Asia, sectarian organizations and political parties supply basic services to ordinary people more extensively and effectively than governments. In sub-Saharan Africa, families struggle to pay hospital fees, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) launch welfare programs as states cut subsidies and social programs. Likewise, in parts of Latin America, international and domestic NGOs and, increasingly, private firms are key suppliers of social welfare in both urban and rural communities. Even in the United States, where the welfare state is far more developed, secular NGOs and faith-based organizations are critical components of social safety nets. Despite official entitlements to public welfare, citizens in Russia face increasing out-of-pocket expenses as they are effectively compelled to seek social services through the private market. In The Politics of Non-state Social Welfare, a multidisciplinary group of contributors use survey data analysis, spatial analysis, in-depth interviews, and ethnographic and archival research to explore the fundamental transformation of the relationship between states and citizens. The book highlights the political consequences of the non-state provision of social welfare, including the ramifications for equitable and sustainable access to social services, accountability for citizens, and state capacity. The authors do not assume that non-state providers will surpass the performance of weak, inefficient, or sometimes corrupt states but instead offer a systematic analysis of a wide spectrum of non-state actors in a variety of contexts around the world, including sectarian political parties, faith-based organizations, community-based organizations, family networks, informal brokers, and private firms. Contributors: Scott Allard, University of Chicago; Jennifer N. Brass, Indiana University; Melani Cammett, Brown University; Linda Cook, Brown University; Ian Gough, London School of Economics; Michael Jennings, School of Oriental and African Studies; Anirudh Krishna, Duke University; Pauline Jones Luong, University of Michigan; Lauren M. MacLean, Indiana University; Alejandra Mizala, University of Chile; Alison Post, University of California, Berkeley; Ben Ross Schneider, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Domestic and international development strategies often focus on private ownership as a crucial anchor for long-term investment; the security of property rights provides a foundation for capitalist expansion. In recent years, Thailand's policies have been hailed as a prime example of how granting formal land rights to poor farmers in low-income countries can result in economic benefits. But the country provides a puzzle: Thailand faced major security threats from colonial powers in the nineteenth century and from communism in the twentieth century, yet only in the latter case did the government respond with pro-development tactics. In Land and Loyalty, Tomas Larsson argues that institutional underdevelopment may prove, under certain circumstances, a strategic advantage rather than a weakness and that external threats play an important role in shaping the development of property regimes. Security concerns, he find, often guide economic policy. The domestic legacies, legal and socioeconomic, resulting from state responses to the outside world shape and limit the strategies available to politicians. While Larsson's extensive archival research findings are drawn from Thai sources, he situates the experiences of Thailand in comparative perspective by contrasting them with the trajectory of property rights in Japan, Burma, and the Philippines.
This book sets forth the evolution of Korea's law and legal system from the Chos«ín dynasty through the colonial and postcolonial modern periods. This is the first book in English that comprehensively studies Korean legal history in comparison with European legal history, with particular emphasis on customary law. Korea's passage to Romano-German civil law under Japanese rule marked a drastic departure from its indigenous legal tradition. The transplantation of modern civil law in Korea was facilitated by Japanese colonial jurists who created a Korean customary law; this constructed customary law served as an intermediary regime between tradition and the demands of modern law. The transformation of Korean law by the forces of Westernisation points to new interpretations of colonial history and presents an intriguing case for investigating the spread of law on a global level. In-depth discussions of French customary law and Japanese legal history also provide a solid conceptual framework suitable for comparing European and East Asian legal traditions.

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