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This introduction to recursive theory computability begins with a mathematical characterization of computable functions, develops the mathematical theory and includes a full discussion of noncomputability and undecidability. Later chapters move on to more advanced topics such as degrees of unsolvability and Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem.
Computability Theory: An Introduction to Recursion Theory provides a concise, comprehensive, and authoritative introduction to contemporary computability theory, techniques, and results. The basic concepts and techniques of computability theory are placed in their historical, philosophical and logical context. This presentation is characterized by an unusual breadth of coverage and the inclusion of advanced topics not to be found elsewhere in the literature at this level. The text includes both the standard material for a first course in computability and more advanced looks at degree structures, forcing, priority methods, and determinacy. The final chapter explores a variety of computability applications to mathematics and science. Computability Theory is an invaluable text, reference, and guide to the direction of current research in the field. Nowhere else will you find the techniques and results of this beautiful and basic subject brought alive in such an approachable way. Frequent historical information presented throughout More extensive motivation for each of the topics than other texts currently available Connects with topics not included in other textbooks, such as complexity theory
The aim of this textbook is to present an account of the theory of computation. After introducing the concept of a model of computation and presenting various examples, the author explores the limitations of effective computation via basic recursion theory. Self-reference and other methods are introduced as fundamental and basic tools for constructing and manipulating algorithms. From there the book considers the complexity of computations and the notion of a complexity measure is introduced. Finally, the book culminates in considering time and space measures and in classifying computable functions as being either feasible or not. The author assumes only a basic familiarity with discrete mathematics and computing, making this textbook ideal for a graduate-level introductory course. It is based on many such courses presented by the author and so numerous exercises are included. In addition, the solutions to most of these exercises are provided.
Traces the development of recursive functions from their origins in the late nineteenth century to the mid-1930s, with particular emphasis on the work and influence of Kurt Gödel.
The task of developing algorithms to solve problems has always been considered by mathematicians to be an especially interesting and im portant one. Normally an algorithm is applicable only to a narrowly limited group of problems. Such is for instance the Euclidean algorithm, which determines the greatest common divisor of two numbers, or the well-known procedure which is used to obtain the square root of a natural number in decimal notation. The more important these special algorithms are, all the more desirable it seems to have algorithms of a greater range of applicability at one's disposal. Throughout the centuries, attempts to provide algorithms applicable as widely as possible were rather unsuc cessful. It was only in the second half of the last century that the first appreciable advance took place. Namely, an important group of the inferences of the logic of predicates was given in the form of a calculus. (Here the Boolean algebra played an essential pioneer role. ) One could now perhaps have conjectured that all mathematical problems are solvable by algorithms. However, well-known, yet unsolved problems (problems like the word problem of group theory or Hilbert's tenth problem, which considers the question of solvability of Diophantine equations) were warnings to be careful. Nevertheless, the impulse had been given to search for the essence of algorithms. Leibniz already had inquired into this problem, but without success.

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