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Contemporary U.S. Cinema is a forceful exploration of the tumultuous changes that have dominated the shifting landscape of American film-making over the past three decades. From the explosive release of Easy Rider to the excesses of Heaven's Gate and the comic book figures of Spider-Man, its aim is to examine the economic, social and cultural contexts of mainstream and independent American films. The book divides into nine provocative chapters with material on: the most significant individual film-makers, such as Scorsese, Coppola and Lucas, as well as independent film-makers like Jarmusch and Anders the careers of leading actors of the last thirty years, such as Jack Nicholson, Robert Redford and Julia Roberts, whilst exploring the powerful position of the film star in the modern American film-making process the economics of Contemporary U.S. Cinema with particular reference to the tortuous journey from production, distribution and exhibition of Waterworld and Titanic the artistic influence of foreign film-makers, such as François Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard, and explores Hollywood's increasing dominance and reliance on the global market genres, sequels and the recent developments in computer-based technologies, using examples from The Godfather I - III, The Matrix, the Star Wars saga and remakes from Shaft to Ocean's Eleven The book is illustrated with stills throughout and includes a bibliography and annotated further reading list.
This is a comprehensive introduction to post-classical American film. Covering American cinema since 1960, the text looks at both Hollywood and non-mainstream cinema.
Visions of Empire explores film's function as a medium of political communication, recognizing not just the propaganda film, but the various ways that conventional narrative films embody, question, or critique established social values underlying American attitudes toward historical, social, and political events. Stephen Prince discusses Hollywood film productions of the 1980s in terms of salient political issues of the period, including anxieties about declining U.S. military power, the wars in Central America and the prospects for U.S. intervention, the legacy of the Vietnam War, and urban decay. In analyzing these images and narratives, the author also describes and evaluates the cinematic styles available in the Hollywood tradition to filmmakers who address political issues. Chapter 1 establishes the theoretical framework by considering some basic features of the political landscape of the Reagan era. Theories about political representation and the place of ideology in film are also examined. Chapters 2 through 5 focus on the major cycles of political films. Chapter 2 examines the new Cold War films which played upon fears of the Soviet menace (Rambo, Invasion USA, Red Dawn, and Top Gun). Chapter 3 discusses the small group of films--Under Fire, Salvador, El Norte and others--that addressed the wars in Latin America and the ways they explained the origins of the conflicts and the U.S. role therein. Various histories and mythologies on film of the Vietnam War are examined in Chapter 4 as examples of the symbolic reconstruction of social memory. Chapter 5 looks at politicized science fiction films (Blade Runner, Aliens, Robocop, and Total Recall) offering critical commentaries on the pathologies of contemporary urban society and capitalism.
How has America censored British films? In this original, fascinating book, Anthony Slide answers this question, making full use for the first time of the recently opened US Production Code Administration files. Film by film from the 1930s through to the 1960s, he tells the inside story of the ongoing dialogue between the British film making industry and the American censors. The book shows graphically how the Production Code system operated, revealing how the censors viewed moral issues, violence, bad language and matters of decorum as well as revealing acute national differences, such as American concern over the British preoccupation with toilets. It also dispels myths, depicting chief censor Joseph Breen and his staff as knowledgeable people who sympathized with and admired the British film industry.
La interpretació de films basats en obres provinents d'altres mitjans a quina ha estat limitada per enfocaments crítics que privilegien l'obra original; aquest és el cas, especialment, de les adaptacions dels clàssics de la literatura. A través de l'anàlisis detallades de dos films contemporanis -The Age of Innocence (Martin Scorsese, 1993) i The Portrait of a Lady (Jane Campion, 1996)-, aquest treball replanteja l'adaptació com una manera de recreació del passat que cristal·litza a través de les textures de l'anomenada popularment pel·lícula d'època. Traslladant la reescriptura de dos textos del realisme literari nord-americà al context de l'obra de tots dos cineastes, l'anàlisi comparativa es concentra en la imatge mentre que portadora d'una memòria intertextual recuperada sota el prisma de diferents discursos contemporanis.
Borrowing its title from Gregg Araki's 2005 film, in which the camera's contemplation of the male body encourages us to feel that body, and covering a broad span of subjects and films, Mysterious Skin offers a wider, more representative picture of the depiction of the male body in contemporary world cinemas than has hitherto been attempted. An international array of major experts explore the treatment of masculinity and the male body in the cinemas of Africa, Australia, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, India, North America, Spain, Taiwan and Vietnam, as well as Hollywood. Their common concern is to reveal how the representation of the male body is used in films to convey a country's anxieties about its national identity and history, as well as how it engages with questions of racial, sexual or gender politics. They discuss key actors, directors and films of these countries, from Ewan MacGregor in Peter Greenaway's The Pillow Book, through the films of Wong Kar Wai, to Paul Hogan as Mick Dundee in Crocodile Dundee. In so doing, Mysterious Skin also provides a strong overview of important cinema produced around the world in the last twenty years.
Film is simply too big and too influential a mass medium to ignore. Surprisingly enough, although film is already a staple in many composition classrooms, little has been written about its uses-leaving many of us uncertain of how to proceed. Cinema-(to)-Graphy takes you inside some of those classrooms, offering new ideas on integrating film and other visual media with student writing. Ellen Bishop divides the book into four sections based on where the authors locate themselves in the field of film and writing. These essays, if anything, resist easy categorization; all of them begin to unfold both theoretical and practical questions that arise from the conversation about film and writing, cultural studies, and undergraduate students. These instructors offer special insight into both course structures and materials, and the methods through which they make use of them. Best of all, they offer new strategies to help students become critical thinkers who can responsibly speak to and read their media-saturated world, and who can identify and work with the problems posed by language. This anthology will be of great use to university and college teachers of all ranks, especially graduate student teachers interested in integrating film into their composition classrooms.

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