Download Free Coxeys Crusade For Jobs Unemployment In The Gilded Age Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Coxeys Crusade For Jobs Unemployment In The Gilded Age and write the review.

In the depths of a depression in 1894, a highly successful Gilded Age businessman named Jacob Coxey led a group of jobless men on a march from his hometown of Massillon, Ohio, to the steps of the nation's Capitol. Though a financial panic and the resulting widespread business failures caused millions of Americans to be without work at the time, the word unemployment was rarely used and generally misunderstood. In an era that worshipped the self-reliant individual who triumphed in a laissez-faire market, the out-of-work "tramp" was disparaged as weak or flawed, and undeserving of assistance. Private charities were unable to meet the needs of the jobless, and only a few communities experimented with public works programs. Despite these limitations, Coxey conceived a plan to put millions back to work building a nationwide system of roads and drew attention to his idea with the march to Washington. In Coxey's Crusade for Jobs, Jerry Prout recounts Coxey's story and adds depth and context by focusing on the reporters who were embedded in the march. Their fascinating depictions of life on the road occupied the headlines and front pages of America's newspapers for more than a month, turning the spectacle into a serialized drama. These accounts humanized the idea of unemployment and helped Americans realize that in a new industrial economy, unemployment was not going away and the unemployed deserved attention. This unique study will appeal to scholars and students interested in the Gilded Age and US and labor history.
In 1893, after a major British bank failure, a run on U.S. gold reserves, and a late-June stock-market crash, America was in the throes of a serious economic depression. Unemployment rose, foreclosures climbed, and popular unrest mounted. By the following spring, businessman and Populist agitator Jacob S. Coxey was fed up with government inactivity in the face of the crisis. With the help of eccentric showman Carl Browne, he led a group of several hundred unemployed wage earners, small farmers, and crossroads merchants on a march from Massillon, Ohio, to Washington, D.C., to present a "petition in boots" for government-financed jobs building and repairing the nation’s roads. On May 1, the Coxeyites descended on the center of government, where Coxey attempted to deliver a speech on the Capitol steps. The police attacked, a melee ensued, and Coxey and Browne spent a month in jail. Meanwhile, other Coxey-inspired contingents were on their way east from places as far away as San Francisco and Portland. Some of them even hijacked trains along the way. Who was Coxey, and what motivated him—along with the angry marchers who joined his cause? What did other Americans think of the protesters? Was there ever any chance that the protesters’ demands would be met? Where did the agitators fit in with the politics of their day, and how did their actions jibe with the other labor-related protests happening that year? In this concise and gripping narrative, Benjamin F. Alexander contextualizes the march by vividly describing the misery wrought by the Panic of ’93. Alexander brings both Coxey and his fellow leaders to life, along with the reporters and spies who traveled with them and the diverse group of captivated newspaper readers who followed the progress of the marches and train heists. Coxey’s Army explains how the demands of the Coxeyites—far from being the wild schemes of a small group of cranks—fit into a larger history of economic theories that received serious attention long before and long after the Coxey march. Despite running a gauntlet of ridicule, the marchers laid down a rough outline of what, some forty years later, emerged as the New Deal.
Americans pay famously close attention to "the market," obsessively watching trends, patterns, and swings and looking for clues in every fluctuation. In Reading the Market, Peter Knight explores the Gilded Age origins and development of this peculiar interest. He tracks the historic shift in market operations from local to national while examining how present-day ideas about the nature of markets are tied to past genres of financial representation. Drawing on the late nineteenth-century explosion of art, literature, and media, which sought to dramatize the workings of the stock market for a wide audience, Knight shows how ordinary Americans became both emotionally and financially invested in the market. He analyzes popular investment manuals, brokers’ newsletters, newspaper columns, magazine articles, illustrations, and cartoons. He also introduces readers to fiction featuring financial tricksters, which was characterized by themes of personal trust and insider information. The book reveals how the popular culture of the period shaped the very idea of the market as a self-regulating mechanism by making the impersonal abstractions of high finance personal and concrete. From the rise of ticker-tape technology to the development of conspiracy theories, Reading the Market argues that commentary on the Stock Exchange between 1870 and 1915 changed how Americans understood finance—and explains what our pervasive interest in Wall Street says about us now.
Standard narratives of Native American history view the nineteenth century in terms of steadily declining Indigenous sovereignty, from removal of southeastern tribes to the 1887 General Allotment Act. In Crooked Paths to Allotment, C. Joseph Geneti
IEP Goal Writing for Speech-Language Pathologists: Utilizing State Standardsfamiliarizes the speech-language pathologist (SLP) with specific Early Learning Standards (ELS) and Common Core State Standards (CCSS) as well as the speech-language skills necessary for students to be successful with the school curriculum. It also describes how to write defensible Individualized Education Plan (IEP) goals that are related to the ELS and CCSS. SLPs work through a set of steps to determine a student's speech-language needs. First, an SLP needs to determine what speech-language skills are necessary for mastery of specific standards. Then, the SLP determines what prerequisite skills are involved for each targeted speech-language skill. Finally, there is a determination of which steps to mastery need to be followed. It is through this process that an SLP and team of professionals can appropriately develop interventions and an effective IEP. The text takes an in-depth look at the following speech-language areas: vocabulary, questions, summarize, compare and contrast, main idea and details, critical thinking, pragmatics, syntax and morphology, and articulation and phonological processes. These areas were selected because they are the most commonly addressed skills of intervention for students aged three to twenty-one with all levels of functioning. For each listed area, the text analyzes the prerequisite skills and the corresponding steps to mastery. It provides a unique, step-by-step process for transforming the steps to mastery into defensible IEP goals. The key is to remember that the goal must be understandable, doable, measurable, and achievable. This text provides clear guidelines of quantifiable building blocks to achieve specific goals defined by the student's IEP. School-based SLPs are instrumental in helping students develop speech and language skills essential for mastery of the curriculum and standards. All SLPs working with school-aged children in public schools, private practice, or outpatient clinics will benefit from the information in this text.
After a cyclone transports her to the land of Oz, Dorothy must seek out the great Wizard in order to return to Kansas.
From Tin Pan Alley to grand opera, player-pianos to phonograph records, David Suisman explores the rise of music as big business and the creation of a radically new musical culture. Provocative, original, and lucidly written, Selling Sounds reveals the commercial architecture of America’s musical life.

Best Books

DMCA - Contact