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Updated to reflect changes in the criminal justice systems in several countries, An Introduction to Comparative Legal Models of Criminal Justice, Second Edition explores and illustrates the idea that a country’s legal model determines the character of its police, corrections, and legal system. It focuses on how law shapes policing, including how it causes police to act as though they are above the law. Each chapter is designed as an independent unit of study. Along with updates to each chapter, other new additions to the second edition include: A list of learning objectives at the beginning of each chapter A summary at the end of each chapter Classroom exercises A threefold increase to the number of photographs An expanded discussion of the oldest known legal systems An extensive discussion on the rule of law A discussion of United Nations actions to improve juvenile justice Increased attention to the role of the Organization of American States Thorough and concise, An Introduction to Comparative Legal Models of Criminal Justice, Second Edition provides a text covering the different major legal models in the world that is ideal for a one-semester course.
In order to fully grasp criminal law concepts, students must go beyond mere rote memorization of the penal code and attempt to understand where the laws originate from and how they have developed. Criminal Law, Second Edition blends legal and moral reasoning in the examination of crimes and explores the history relating to jurisprudence and roots of criminal law. It fosters discussions of controversial issues and delivers abridged case law decisions that target the essence of appellate rulings. Grounded in the model penal code, making the text national in scope, this volume examines: Why the criminal codes originated, and the moral, religious, spiritual, and human influences that led to our present system How crimes are described in the modern criminal justice model The two essential elements necessary for criminal culpability: actus reus (the act committed or omitted) and mens rea (the mind and intent of the actor) Offenses against the body resulting in death, including murder, manslaughter, felony murder, and negligent homicide Nonterminal criminal conduct against the body, including robbery, kidnapping, false imprisonment, assault, and hate crimes Sexual assault, rape, necrophilia, incest, and child molestation Property offenses, such as larceny/theft, bribery, forgery, and embezzlement Crimes against the home, including burglary, trespass, arson, and vandalism The book also examines controversial public morality issues such as prostitution, drug legalization, obscenity, and pornography. The final two chapters discuss inchoate offenses, where the criminal act has not been completed, and various criminal defenses such as legal insanity, entrapment, coercion, self-defense, and mistake of fact or law. Important keywords introduce each chapter, and discussion questions and suggested readings appear at the end of each chapter, prompting lively debate and further inquiry into a fascinating subject area that continues to evolve.
The concept that certain objects and persons may be legitimately attacked during armed conflicts has been well recognised and developed through the history of warfare. This book explores the relationship between international law and targeting practice in determining whether an object is a lawful military target. By examining both the interpretation and its post-ratification application this book provides a comprehensive analysis of the definition of military objective adopted in 1977 Additional Protocol I to the four 1949 Geneva Conventions and its use in practice. Tackling topical issues such as the targeting of TV and radio stations or cyber targets, Agnieszka Jachec-Neale analyses the concept of military objective within the context of both modern military doctrine and the major coalition operations which have been undertaken since it was formally defined. This monograph will be of great interest to students and scholars of international law and the law of armed conflict, as well as security studies and international relations.
The Grammar of Criminal Law is a 3-volume work that addresses the field of international and comparative criminal law, with its primary focus on the issues of international concern, ranging from genocide, to domestic efforts to combat terrorism, to torture, and to other international crimes. The first volume is devoted to foundational issues. The Grammar of Criminal Law is unique in its systematic emphasis on the relationship between language and legal theory; there is no comparable comparative study of legal language. Written in the spirit of Fletcher's classic Rethinking Criminal Law, this work is essential reading in the field of international and comparative law.
The Second Edition of Defenses in Contemporary International Criminal Law ventures farther into this uneasy territory than any previous work, offering a meticulous analysis of the case law in the post World War II Military Tribunals and the ad hoc tribunals for Rwanda and the Former Yugoslavia, with particular attention to the defenses developed, their rationales, and their origins in various municipal systems. It analyzes the defense provisions in the charters and statutes underlying these tribunals and the new International Criminal Court, while examining the first judgment in this field rendered by the Special Court for Sierra Leone, on June 20, 2007.
The close of the twentieth century has brought changes to Europe of such magnitude that some predict the return of the Age of Europe. In this timely update of Politics in Wesern Europe, editors Gerald A. Dorfman and Peter J. Duignan and numerous distinguished contributors examine the events leading to the tumultuous changes and the impact these changes will have on the peoples of Western Europe. This new edition includes a fresh study of the history of European efforts to defend and unite twelve independent nations into one common market from 1946 to 1992. Another essay examines the partitioning and reunification of Germany and how German unification will affect the rest of Europe and the United States. In addition, the authors analyze how the fall of the Iron Curtain and the demise of communism may affect the countries of Western Europe. This comprehensive work features new chapters on Ireland and Greece; updated chapters on Great Britain, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Spain, Portugal, Italy, and Austria; in addition to chapters on the Nordic countries and Switzerland. Politics in Western Europe offers valuable insights for students, journalists, diplomats, and the international business community.
In today's globalized society, an international exchange of ideas and views is indispensable within the field of social sciences, including criminology and criminal justice studies. The research group Governance of Security (GofS) fosters contemporary international discourses on issues of crime and crime control. In 2008, GofS started a research paper series, combining theoretical and empirical articles on issues reflecting the research activities of GofS. This research group is a collaboration between Ghent University and Ghent University College in Belgium. GofS concentrates its research around the study of administrative and judicial policy that have been developed with respect to new issues of crime and insecurity. The GofS series â?? Governance of Security Research Papers (GofS) â?? is published by Maklu Publishing (Belgium). Readings on Criminal Justice, Criminal Law and Policing â?? Volume 2 of GofS's series Governance of Security Research Papers â?? includes the following: Punishment across Borders: The Rationales behind International Execution of Sentences â?¢ Interpreting the Concept of 'Discretionary Power' within the Execution of Sentences: A Comparison between the Belgian and French Situation â?¢ Esperanto for EU Crime Statistics: Towards Common European Offense Definitions in an EU-level Offense Classification System â?¢ Developing a Framework for the Legal Rights of Victims and Witnesses â?¢ What Can European Institutions and the International Criminal Court Learn from Each Other? â?¢ Purpose Limitation in EU-US Data Exchange in Criminal Matters: The Remains of the Day â?¢ Some Criminal Law Reflections on the Sexual Transmission of HIV â?¢ Reading about Crime in Post-Intervention Societies: A Critical Assessment â?¢ Policing and Leadership: The Case of the Belgian Chiefs of the Local Police â?¢ Reflections on the Possible Integration of Intelligence-Led Policing into Community Policing: The Belgian Case â?¢ Reliability and Correlational Validity of Police Interview Competences: Assessing the Stability of the Police Interview Competency Inventory â?¢ The Role of Europol in Joint Investigation Teams: A Foretaste of an Executive European Police Office? â?¢ Checking Aspects of a "Nodal Orientation" for Policing the Port of Antwerp.
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