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In this revised and updated edition of one of the leading textbooks on psychological anthropology, Charles Lindholm offers a sweeping historical and theoretical introduction to the field, from its earliest developments to the present day. Introducing one of the most fascinating sub-disciplines within anthropology. Culture and Identity explores the ways individual perceptions, emotions, beliefs, values, and even experience of the self can be shaped and changed by shifts in culture and context. Where does our sense of identity and belonging come from? To what extent is our identity consistent, and how much is malleable? What does it mean to be an individual but also a member of a community?
This Companion provides the first definitive overview of psychocultural anthropology: a subject that focuses on cultural, psychological, and social interrelations across cultures. Brings together original essays by leading scholars in the field Offers an in-depth exploration of the concepts and topics that have emerged through contemporary ethnographic work and the processes of global change Key issues range from studies of consciousness and time, emotion, cognition, dreaming, and memory, to the lingering effects of racism and ethnocentrism, violence, identity and subjectivity
This is the first book that provides detailed guidelines of how to conduct multi-disciplinary research to study people’s behaviors in different cultures. Readers are encouraged to look beyond disciplinary boundaries to address issues between individuals and their socio-cultural environments so as to design the most effective studies possible. The core philosophical and theoretical assumptions that underlie the strategies, designs, and techniques used when researching cultural issues are examined. The book reviews all the steps that go into doing cultural research from formulating the research problem to selecting the most appropriate method for data analysis. Realist and interpretivist paradigms together with the theory of cultural models and quantitative, qualitative, mixed-method, and multiple-design strategies are reviewed. Case studies, ethnographies, and interviewing techniques are emphasized throughout. Chapters open with learning objectives and end with a conclusion, a glossary, questions, exercises, and recommended readings. Numerous multidisciplinary examples, tables, and figures demonstrate and synthesize the analysis of data. Information boxes provide historical notes and how-to boxes provide tips on methodological issues. Highlights include: -Encourages researchers to breach disciplinary boundaries to address the problems of human functioning in different cultures (Chs. 1 & 2). -Introduces readers to the theory of cultural models that helps bridge the human mind and socio-cultural realities (Chs. 2 & 10). -Propagates the realist and interpretivist philosophical paradigms for doing cultural studies and demonstrates how to use these approaches when studying people in different cultures (Chs. 3 & 4). -Helps readers formulate productive research questions, articulate concepts, and understand the role theories play in cultural research (Ch. 5 - 6). -Reviews research designs including case-based and variable-based ones, person-centered ethnography, interviewing, and quantitative studies (Chs. 7 - 10). -www.routledge.com/9780415820325/ provides instructors with Power Points, additional references and studies, and questions for discussion and evaluation for each chapter and students with chapter outlines and objectives, key terms and concepts with a hotlink to the definition, and suggested readings and websites. Part 1 explores disciplinary and theoretical thinking to help readers connect different disciplines, theories, and philosophical paradigms in a logical way. Part 2 reviews planning research with an emphasis on defining the research problem. Here readers learn to articulate the purpose of the study and the research questions, work with related conceptual and theoretical foundations, and identify various research strategies including nomothetic and idiographic approaches, variable- and case-based studies, and potential sampling problems. Part 3 reviews the practical aspects of doing cultural research -- how to use various research designs including experimental, quasi-experimental, correlational studies, mixed method designs, and ethnographic and qualitative studies. Methodological problems specific to researching cultural issues such as the equivalence of concepts, the translation of instruments, and verifying measurement invariance are reviewed. Readers are also introduced to ethnography including practical elements such as language training, formal document requirements, and issues related to working in an unfamiliar community. The book concludes with the most crucial aspects of conducting ethical cultural psychological research. Intended for advanced undergraduate or graduate courses that conduct cultural or cross-cultural research including cross-(cultural) psychology, culture and psychology, or research methods/design courses in psychology, anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, social work, education, geography, international relations, business, nursing, public health, and communication, the book also appeals to researchers interested in conducting cross-cultural and cultural studies. Prerequisites include introductory courses on research methods and cross-cultural/cultural psychology.
Negotiating Cultures and Identities examines issues, methods, and models for doing life history research with individual Americans based on interviews and participant observation. John L. Caughey helps students and other researchers explore the ways in which contemporary Americans are influenced by multiple cultural traditions, including ethnic, religious, and occupational frames of reference. Using the example of Salma, a bicultural woman of Pakistani descent who lives in the United States, and the story of Gina, a multicultural American, Caughey examines how to capture the complexity of each situation, including step-by-step methods and exercises that lead the student interviewer through the process of locating and interviewing a research participant, making sense of the material obtained, and writing a cultural portrait. Arguing that comparison between the subject’s life and one’s own is an essential part of the process, the methodology also encourages the investigator to research his or her own social and cultural orientations along the way and to contrast these with those of the subject. The book offers a practical, manageable, and engaging form of qualitative research. It prepares the student to do grounded, experiential work outside the classroom and to explore important issues in contemporary American society, including ethnicity, race, identity, disability, gender, class, occupation, religion, and spirituality as they are culturally understood and experienced in the lives of individual Americans.
No culture is ever completely successful or satisfied with its synthesis of romantic love, companionship, and sexual desire. Whether the setting is a busy metropolis or a quiet farming village, a tension always exists between a community's sexual habits and customs and what it believes to be the proper context for love. Even in Western societies, we prefer sexual passion to romance and companionship, and no study of any culture has shown that individuals regard passion and affection equally. The pursuit of love and sex has generated an infinite number of ambiguities and contradictions, yet every community hopes to find a resolution to this conflict either by joining, dividing, or stressing one act over the other. In this follow-up to Romantic Passion: A Universal Experience?, William R. Jankowiak examines how different cultures rationalize the expression of passionate and comfort love and physical sex. He begins by mapping out the intricacies of the love/sex conundrum and the psychological dilemma of reconciling these competing forces. He then follows with essays on sex, love, and intimacy among Central African foragers and farmers; the love dyad in Lithuania; intimacy among the Lahu of Southwestern China; the interplay of love, sex, and marriage in the High Himalayas; verbalized experiences of love and sexuality in Indonesia; love work as it relates to sex work among prostitutes; intimacies and estrangements in the marital and extramarital relationships of Huli men; infidelity and masculinity in Southwestern Nigeria; and the ritual of sex and the rejuvenation of the love bond among married couples in the United States.
Jenny Huberman provides an ethnographic study of encounters between western tourists and the children who work as unlicensed peddlers and guides along the riverfront city of Banaras, India. She examines how and why these children elicit such powerful reactions from western tourists and locals in their community as well as how the children themselves experience their work and render it meaningful. Ambivalent Encounters brings together scholarship on the anthropology of childhood, tourism, consumption, and exchange to ask why children emerge as objects of the international tourist gaze; what role they play in representing socio-economic change; how children are valued and devalued; why they elicit anxieties, fantasies, and debates; and what these tourist encounters teach us more generally about the nature of human interaction. It examines the role of gender in mediating experiences of social change—girls are praised by locals for participating constructively in the informal tourist economy while boys are accused of deviant behavior. Huberman is interested equally in the children’s and adults’ perspectives; her own experiences as a western visitor and researcher provide an intriguing entry into her interpretations.

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