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Defining Creativity comprehensively explains what creativity is, from a biological, psychological, and socio-cultural standpoint. At the same time, it makes for a concise and inspiring read that brings together everything there is to know about creativity.
After Newton died in 1727, a monument was erected in the Scientist's Corner of Westminster Abbey. It was decorated with a pile of four books and adorned with cherubs holding a prism, a telescope and newly minted coins. The implication is clear. Newton's towering intellect and god-given gift for creative thinking was the origin of his inspiration. Not far away, at the front of the monument to Newton, is the tomb of Charles Darwin, who published On the Origin of Species, which first discussed the evolution of man. The proximity of the monuments is telling. If we are to define the single, most unique human attribute evolution has produced, it must be our ability to think creatively. Thinking is the ultimate human resource. Breaking through the barriers posed by dogma, and reaching beyond the limits of established patterns of thinking to discover what is new and useful is the engine that drives society. This book, which had its genesis in a conference organized by Karl Pfenninger, and held at Aspen, Colorado, entitled 'Higher brain function, art and science: an interdisciplinary examination of the creative process', brings together articles by thirteen contributors from the fields of science, art and music. Two of the contributors have been awarded Nobel prizes, and all are distinguished representatives of their fields. The Origins of Creativity is organized around four central themes of creativity: the creative experience in art and science; the biologicalbasis of imagination, emotion and reason; creative powers and the environment; and the mind's perception of patterns. The views of artists, who couch their ideas in more metaphorical language, mingle with the analytical thoughts of scientists who strive to understand how the brain generates images and ideas. The voices of creators - artist, scientist, mathematician - and of those who study creative activity - neuroscientist, psychologist, philosopher - generate a broad spectrum of views on creativity whose integration offers new insights and becomes a creative act in itself. This book offers insights into the origins of human creativity to scientists, artists, and general readers. Its inter-disciplinary authorship presents a uniquely broad perspective on current research, and the style throughout is accessible and engaging.
Attempts to show how innovation in the post-Google generation is often catalyzed by those who cross a conventional line so firmly drawn between the arts and the sciences.
This interdisciplinary volume introduces new theories and ideas on creativity from the perspectives of science and art. Featuring contributions from leading researchers, theorists and artists working in artificial intelligence, generative art, creative computing, music composition, and cybernetics, the book examines the relationship between computation and creativity from both analytic and practical perspectives. Each contributor describes innovative new ways creativity can be understood through, and inspired by, computers. The book tackles critical philosophical questions and discusses the major issues raised by computational creativity, including: whether a computer can exhibit creativity independently of its creator; what kinds of creativity are possible in light of our knowledge from computational simulation, artificial intelligence, evolutionary theory and information theory; and whether we can begin to automate the evaluation of aesthetics and creativity in silico. These important, often controversial questions are contextualised by current thinking in computational creative arts practice. Leading artistic practitioners discuss their approaches to working creatively with computational systems in a diverse array of media, including music, sound art, visual art, and interactivity. The volume also includes a comprehensive review of computational aesthetic evaluation and judgement research, alongside discussion and insights from pioneering artists working with computation as a creative medium over the last fifty years. A distinguishing feature of this volume is that it explains and grounds new theoretical ideas on creativity through practical applications and creative practice. Computers and Creativity will appeal to theorists, researchers in artificial intelligence, generative and evolutionary computing, practicing artists and musicians, students and any reader generally interested in understanding how computers can impact upon creativity. It bridges concepts from computer science, psychology, neuroscience, visual art, music and philosophy in an accessible way, illustrating how computers are fundamentally changing what we can imagine and create, and how we might shape the creativity of the future. Computers and Creativity will appeal to theorists, researchers in artificial intelligence, generative and evolutionary computing, practicing artists and musicians, students and any reader generally interested in understanding how computers can impact upon creativity. It bridges concepts from computer science, psychology, neuroscience, visual art, music and philosophy in an accessible way, illustrating how computers are fundamentally changing what we can imagine and create, and how we might shape the creativity of the future.
The rise cognitive science has been one of the most important intellectual developments of recent years, stimulating new approaches to everything from philosophy to film studies. This is an introduction to what cognitive science has to offer the humanities and particularly the study of literature. Hogan suggests how the human brain works and makes us feel in response to literature. He walks the reader through all of the major theories of cognitive science that are important for the humanities in order to understand the production and reception of literature.
How can you unlock your own creativity to help children learn science creatively? How do you bring the world of ‘real science’ into the classroom? Where does science fit in a creative curriculum? This second edition of Teaching Science Creatively has been fully updated to reflect new research, initiatives and developments in the field. It offers innovative starting points to enhance your teaching and highlights curiosity, observation, exploration and enquiry as central components of children’s creative learning in science. Illustrated throughout with examples from the classroom and beyond, the book explores how creative teaching can harness children’s sense of wonder about the world around them. With easily accessible chapters, it offers a comprehensive introduction to the core elements of creative science learning, supporting both teacher and child in developing scientific concepts and skills. The book explores key issues such as: • the links between scientific and creative processes • how to teach creatively, and for creativity • the role of play in early scientific learning • developing scientific understanding through drama (new) • using the outdoors in science • how theories of learning relate to children’s creative development • teaching science topics in innovative and creative ways – games, drama, role play, puppets, mini-safaris and welly walks! Stimulating and accessible, with contemporary and cutting-edge practice at the forefront, Teaching Science Creatively introduces fresh ideas to support and motivate both new and experienced primary teachers. It is an essential purchase for any professional who wishes to incorporate creative approaches to teaching science in their classroom.
Dimensions of Creativity brings together original articles that draw on a range of disciplines -- from the history and sociology of science, psychology, philosophy, and artificial intelligence -- to ask how creative ideas arise, and whether creativity can be objectively defined and measured. Margaret Boden and her colleagues Simon Schaffer, Gerd Gigerenzer, David N. Perkins, Howard Gardner, Colin Martindale, and Hans J. Eysenck demonstrate that creativity requires not only challenging new ideas but their acceptance by some relevant social group. Although some new ideas can arise as novel associations, others are generated by exploiting structural features of an existing conceptual space. Strong motivations often drive the creators and those who evaluate and perpetuate their work. The seven essays -- although very different -- are complementary. The book can serve as an up-to-date introduction to the study of creativity in various disciplines. The many references provide a way into the relevant literature. Contents: Introduction, Margaret A. BodenMaking Up Discovery, Simon SchafferWhere Do New Ideas Come From? Or, How Psychological Measurement Creates Psychological Theory, Gerd GigerenzerWhat Is Creativity? Margaret A. BodenCreativity: Beyond the Darwinian Paradigm, David N. PerkinsThe Creators' Patterns, Howard GardnerHow Can We Measure a Society's Creativity? Colin MartindaleThe Measurement of Creativity, Hans J. Eysenck "A Bradford Book"

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