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The sociology of deviance was in its heyday when Prentice-Hall published this book in 1969. John Lofland traces the field from pre-World War II to the late sixties and pioneers the application of "grounded theory" to the study of deviant behavior. In his new prologue, Joel Best writes, "More than thirty years after the book first appeared, we have no better synthesis of the labeling approach."
Nurture or nature? Biology or environment? Why are some people intelligent, or personable, or creative and others obtuse, or shy, or unimaginative? Although each human being is a unique mixture of positive and negative traits and behaviors, the question remains: What is the neurobiological basis for each individual’s makeup? For example, why does one person suffer from a disorder (e.g., ADHD, autism, mental retardation) and another lives free of maladies? These are just some of the issues addressed in detail in Neurobiology of Exceptionality. The introductory chapter provides a broad-based overview of current neurobiological techniques (i.e., terms, procedures, and technologies), which are followed by chapters that offer in-depth examination of the neurobiological bases for: • Impulsive sensation seeking • Creativity • Intelligence • Antisociality • Autism, mental retardation, and Down Syndrome • ADHD • Savant Syndrome This volume provides a one-stop source for clinical psychologists and other allied mental health professionals to access information on a wide range of research on the neurobiology of psychological and psychiatric traits. It is designed to give readers an overview of the current knowledge base of the biological processes for each trait. It is unlikely that any one book could cover all human traits, but the Neurobiology of Exceptionality addresses a wide range of exceptional psychological traits and psychiatric disorders.
Traces the history of freak shows, describes the deceptions used in marketing carnival attractions, and looks at changing public attitudes
In the past few years an increasing number of colleges and universities have added courses in biomedical ethics to their curricula. To some extent, these additions serve to satisfy student demands for "relevance. " But it is also true that such changes reflect a deepening desire on the part of the academic community to deal effectively with a host of problems which must be solved if we are to have a health-care delivery system which is efficient, humane, and just. To a large degree, these problems are the unique result of both rapidly changing moral values and dramatic advances in biomedical technology. The past decade has witnessed sudden and conspicuous controversy over the morality and legality of new practices relating to abortion, therapy for the mentally ill, experimentation using human subjects, forms of genetic interven tion, suicide, and euthanasia. Malpractice suits abound and astronomical fees for malpractice insurance threaten the very possibility of medical and health-care practice. Without the backing of a clear moral consensus, the law is frequently forced into resolving these conflicts only to see the moral issues involved still hotly debated and the validity of existing law further questioned. In the case of abortion, for example, the laws have changed radically, and the widely pub licized recent conviction of Dr. Edelin in Boston has done little to foster a moral consensus or even render the exact status of the law beyond reasonable question.
How do humans behave when under threat of attack or disaster? How does the social context affect individual behavior? Anthony Mawson provides an illuminating examination of individual and collective behavior under conditions of stress and danger, in response to both natural and manmade threats and disasters. Opening with a question about the interpretation of "mass panic" in combat , the book gradually unfolds into a multidisciplinary analysis of the psychobiological basis of social relationships and the neural organization of motivation and emotion. Mawson provides a comprehensive review and synthesis of the mass panic and disaster literature and offers a social attachment model, that recognizes the fundamentally gregarious nature of human beings and the primacy of attachments. He argues that the typical response to threat and danger is neither fight nor flight, nor social breakdown, but increased affiliation and camaraderie. This book is unique in addressing the behavioral and social aspects of threat and disaster. It will appeal to social scientists across a range of disciplines, to public administrators, and to disaster and public health professionals.
Providing an overview of researchers' and practitioners’ “confessions” on the fascinating phenomenon of failed or derailed organizational health and well-being interventions and contextualizing these confessions is the aim of this innovative volume. Organizational intervention failures, paradoxes and unexpected consequences can offer a lot of rich and extremely useful practical lessons on intervention design and implementation and possibly on the design of future research on organizational interventions. This volume presents lessons learned from derailed interventions and provides possible solutions to those tasked with implementing interventions. It provides an open, practical and solutions-focused account of researchers' and practitioners' experiences in implementing organizational interventions for health and well-being.
The volume consists of papers from the 1985 symposium "Identification of the Gifted" at the Sixth World Conference on Gifted and Talented Children in Hamburg (Federal Republic of Germany). Twelve chapters have the following titles and authors: (1) "Introduction" (J. F. Feldhusen and K. A. Heller); (2) "A Conception of Giftedness" (J. F. Feldhusen); (3) "The Identification of Gifted Children in Secondary Education and a Description of Their Situation in Holland" (F. J. Monks et al.); (4) Identification, Development and Analysis of Talented and Gifted Children in West Germany" (K. A. Heller and E. A. Hany); (5) "Identification of Highly Gifted Adolescents--Methods and Experiences" (G. Trost); (6) "Identification by Provision: Limited Field Test of a Radical Alternative for Identifying Gifted Students" (B. M. Shore and A. Tsiamis); (7) "The Identification and Labeling of Gifted Children. What Does Research Tell Us?" (A. Robinson); (8) "Taxonomical Approach to Qualitatively Differential Didactics for the Gifted in a Democracy" (H. G. Jellen and D. L. Gulley); (9) "Competition System for Gifted Children in Hungary" (A. Pek); (10) "Talent Education in the Hungarian School Environment" (Z. Bathory); (11) "The First Information and Counseling Center for the Gifted in West Germany" (B. Feger and T. Prado); (12) "Are Highly Gifted Children and Adolescents Especially Susceptible to Anorexia Nervosa" (M. Detzner and M. H. Schmidt). The Appendix includes a selected bibliography with emphasis on German literature. (JW)

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