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Accessible, concise, and self-contained, this book offers an outstanding introduction to three related subjects: differential geometry, differential topology, and dynamical systems. Topics of special interest addressed in the book include Brouwer's fixed point theorem, Morse Theory, and the geodesic flow. Smooth manifolds, Riemannian metrics, affine connections, the curvature tensor, differential forms, and integration on manifolds provide the foundation for many applications in dynamical systems and mechanics. The authors also discuss the Gauss-Bonnet theorem and its implications in non-Euclidean geometry models. The differential topology aspect of the book centers on classical, transversality theory, Sard's theorem, intersection theory, and fixed-point theorems. The construction of the de Rham cohomology builds further arguments for the strong connection between the differential structure and the topological structure. It also furnishes some of the tools necessary for a complete understanding of the Morse theory. These discussions are followed by an introduction to the theory of hyperbolic systems, with emphasis on the quintessential role of the geodesic flow. The integration of geometric theory, topological theory, and concrete applications to dynamical systems set this book apart. With clean, clear prose and effective examples, the authors' intuitive approach creates a treatment that is comprehensible to relative beginners, yet rigorous enough for those with more background and experience in the field.
Several distinctive aspects make Dynamical Systems unique, including: treating the subject from a mathematical perspective with the proofs of most of the results included providing a careful review of background materials introducing ideas through examples and at a level accessible to a beginning graduate student focusing on multidimensional systems of real variables The book treats the dynamics of both iteration of functions and solutions of ordinary differential equations. Many concepts are first introduced for iteration of functions where the geometry is simpler, but results are interpreted for differential equations. The dynamical systems approach of the book concentrates on properties of the whole system or subsets of the system rather than individual solutions. The more local theory discussed deals with characterizing types of solutions under various hypothesis, and later chapters address more global aspects.
Separation of Variables for Partial Differential Equations: An Eigenfunction Approach includes many realistic applications beyond the usual model problems. The book concentrates on the method of separation of variables for partial differential equations, which remains an integral part of the training in applied mathematics. Beyond the usual model problems, the presentation includes a number of realistic applications that illustrate the power and usefulness of the ideas behind these techniques. This complete, self-contained book includes numerous exercises and error estimates, as well as a rigorous approximation and computational tool.
Like any books on a subject as vast as this, this book has to have a point-of-view to guide the selection of topics. Naber takes the view that the rekindled interest that mathematics and physics have shown in each other of late should be fostered, and that this is best accomplished by allowing them to cohabit. The book weaves together rudimentary notions from the classical gauge theory of physics with the topological and geometrical concepts that became the mathematical models of these notions. The reader is asked to join the author on some vague notion of what an electromagnetic field might be, to be willing to accept a few of the more elementary pronouncements of quantum mechanics, and to have a solid background in real analysis and linear algebra and some of the vocabulary of modern algebra. In return, the book offers an excursion that begins with the definition of a topological space and finds its way eventually to the moduli space of anti-self-dual SU(2) connections on S4 with instanton number -1.
The theory of holomorphic dynamical systems is a subject of increasing interest in mathematics, both for its challenging problems and for its connections with other branches of pure and applied mathematics. A holomorphic dynamical system is the datum of a complex variety and a holomorphic object (such as a self-map or a vector ?eld) acting on it. The study of a holomorphic dynamical system consists in describing the asymptotic behavior of the system, associating it with some invariant objects (easy to compute) which describe the dynamics and classify the possible holomorphic dynamical systems supported by a given manifold. The behavior of a holomorphic dynamical system is pretty much related to the geometry of the ambient manifold (for instance, - perbolic manifolds do no admit chaotic behavior, while projective manifolds have a variety of different chaotic pictures). The techniques used to tackle such pr- lems are of variouskinds: complexanalysis, methodsof real analysis, pluripotential theory, algebraic geometry, differential geometry, topology. To cover all the possible points of view of the subject in a unique occasion has become almost impossible, and the CIME session in Cetraro on Holomorphic Dynamical Systems was not an exception.
This book is a mathematically rigorous introduction to the beautiful subject of ordinary differential equations for beginning graduate or advanced undergraduate students. Students should have a solid background in analysis and linear algebra. The presentation emphasizes commonly used techniques without necessarily striving for completeness or for the treatment of a large number of topics. The first half of the book is devoted to the development of the basic theory: linear systems, existence and uniqueness of solutions to the initial value problem, flows, stability, and smooth dependence of solutions upon initial conditions and parameters. Much of this theory also serves as the paradigm for evolutionary partial differential equations. The second half of the book is devoted to geometric theory: topological conjugacy, invariant manifolds, existence and stability of periodic solutions, bifurcations, normal forms, and the existence of transverse homoclinic points and their link to chaotic dynamics. A common thread throughout the second part is the use of the implicit function theorem in Banach space. Chapter 5, devoted to this topic, the serves as the bridge between the two halves of the book.

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