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What is the Digital State? What is our Digital State of Mind? What does this Digital State mean for brands and for businesses? Big data, new distribution platforms, content collaboration, geo-targeting, crowdsourcing, viral marketing, mobile apps - the technological revolution has transformed the way society communicates and understands itself, and unleashed a whirlwind of new possibilities for marketers, as well as new risks. Mirroring the 'collaborative play space' Tim Berners-Lee first envisaged for the internet, Digital State brings together Simon Pont and 13 thought-leaders drawn from the worlds of advertising, marketing, media, publishing, law, finance and more, to explore what the digital age means for us as individuals, and the implications for the brands seeking to engage with us. Edited and part-written by Simon Pont, Digital State explores the possibilities and pitfalls of our digital age, an age where people can be brought together and new opportunities explored like never before. Contributors include: Faris Yakob, Strategist, creative director, writer, public speaker & geek; former Chief Innovation Officer (MDC Partners); Judd Labarthe, Former Executive Planning Director, Argonauten; Bettina Sherick, SVP, Digital Strategic Marketing, 20th Century Fox International; Austen Kay, Co-founder & Joint Managing Director, w00t! Media; Christian Johnsen, Global Strategy Director, Aegis North America, and cocreator of This Place; Hans Andersson, Senior Partner, Forsman & Bodenfors; Tamara Quinn, Head of Intellectual Property, Berwin Leighton Paisner; Nicholas Pont, SVP, PIMCO; Vicki Connerty, Head of Newcast, ZenithOptimedia Australia; Malcolm Hunter, Brand & Communications Consultant, former Chief Strategy Officer (Aegis); Greg Grimmer, Co-founder, Hurrell Moseley Dawson & Grimmer (HDMG); Stefan Terry, Founder of Leap of Being; former Managing Partner, Heavenly Group Ltd
Accounts of the early events of the computing industry—the Turing machine, the massive Colossus, the ENIAC computer—are well-told tales, and equally well known is the later emergence of Silicon Valley and the rise of the personal computer. Yet there is an extraordinary untold middle history—with deep roots in Minnesota. From the end of World War II through the 1970s, Minnesota was home to the first computing-centered industrial district in the world. Drawing on rare archival documents, photographs, and a wealth of oral histories, Digital State unveils the remarkable story of computer development in the heartland after World War II. These decades found corporations—concentrated in large part in Minnesota—designing state-of-the-art mainframe technologies, revolutionizing new methods of magnetic data storage, and, for the first time, truly integrating software and hardware into valuable products for the American government and public. Minnesota-based companies such as Engineering Research Associates, Univac, Control Data, Cray Research, Honeywell, and IBM Rochester were major international players and together formed an unrivaled epicenter advancing digital technologies. These companies not only brought vibrant economic growth to Minnesota, they nurtured the state’s present-day medical device and software industries and possibly even tomorrow’s nanotechnology. Thomas J. Misa’s groundbreaking history shows how Minnesota recognized and embraced the coming information age through its leading-edge companies, its workforce, and its prominent institutions. Digital State reveals the inner workings of the birth of the digital age in Minnesota and what we can learn from this era of sustained innovation.
Alan Charles Raul The devastating and reprehensible acts of terrorism committed against the 11, 2001 have greatly affected our lives, our United States on September livelihoods, and perhaps our way of living. The system of government embodied in our Constitution and Bill of Rights was designed to inhibit excessively efficient government. By imposing checks and balances against over-reaching governmental power, the Founders intended to promote the rule of laws, not men - and to protect the prerogatives of citizens over and above their rulers. No faction was to become so powerful that the rights and interests of any other groups or individuals could be easily trampled. Specifically, the Framers of our constitutional structure prohibited the government from suppressing speech, inhibiting the right of free association, of people, conducting unreasonable preventing (peaceful) assemblies searches and seizures, or acting without observing the dictates of due process and fair play. After September 11, there is a risk that the philosophical protections of the Constitution could appear more than a trifle "academic. " Indeed, our tradional notions of "fair play" will be sorely tested in the context of our compelling requirements for effective self-defense against brutal, evil killers who hate the very idea of America. Now that we witness the grave physical dangers that confront our families, friends, neighbors, and businesses, our commitment to limited government and robust individual liberties will of our inevitably - and understandably - be challenged.
The impact of information technology (IT) on government in the last five years has been profound. Using the governments of Canada and Ontario (both recognized as international leaders in the use of IT) as case studies, Digital State at the Leading Edge is the first attempt to take a comprehensive view of the impact of IT upon the whole of government, including politics and campaigning, public consultation, service delivery, knowledge management, and procurement. Using the concepts of channel choice, procurement market analysis, organizational integration, and digital leadership, this study explores the inter-relationships among all these aspects of the application of IT to government and politics. The authors seek to understand how IT is transforming government and what the nature of that transformation is. In the process, they offer an explanation of Canada's relative success, and conclude with practical advice to politicians and public servants about how to manage IT in government more effectively. Based on new and original research undertaken over the last five years, the findings of this intriguing study will be of interest to those studying or working in the fields of public administration, political science, and information technology.
Anonymous. WikiLeaks. The Syrian Electronic Army. Edward Snowden. Bitcoin. The Arab Spring. Five years ago, these terms were meaningless to the vast majority of people in the world. Today, they and many like them dominate the news and keep policymakers, security experts, and military and intelligence officials up at night. These groups and individuals are enabled and empowered by digital technology to confound and provoke the state in a way not possible before the Internet revolution. Theyare representative of a wide range of 21st century global actors and a new form of 21st century power: disruptive power. In Disruptive Power, Taylor Owen provides a sweeping look at the way that digital technologies are shaking up the workings of the institutions that have traditionally controlled international affairs: humanitarianism, diplomacy, war, journalism, activism, and finance. The traditional nation state system and the subsequent multinational system were founded on and have long functioned through a concentration of power in the state - through the military, currency controls, foreign policy, the rule of law, and so on. In this book, Owen argues that in every aspect of international affairs, the digitally enabled are changing the way the world works and disrupting the institutions that once held a monopoly on power. Each chapter of Owen's book looks at a different aspect of international affairs, profiling the disruptive innovators and demonstrating how they are challenging existing power structures for good and ill. Owen considers what constitutes successful online international action, what sorts of technologies are being used as well as what these technologies might look like a decade from now, and what new institutions will be needed to moderate the new power structures and ensure accountability. With cutting edge analysis of the fast-changing relationship between the declining state and increasingly powerful non-state actors, Disruptive Power is the essential road map for navigating a networked world.

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