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Author Lisa Steele is one of the most trusted voices in small-flock poultry keeping. Her first book, "Fresh Eggs Daily," was all about healthy, natural care for chickens. Now comes "Duck Eggs Daily," a valuable guide to raising ducks for eggs and companionship. This is also a book for chicken keepers who want to add ducks to their flock. While ducks can live happily with chickens, ducks are different in many important ways. Steele provides an information-packed, beautifully photographed how-to for raising - and living with - happy, healthy ducks. She examines every aspect of her ducks' lives, including duck houses and pools, health care, duck behavior and blending ducks into a chicken flock. She provides a breed chart and a selection of favorite recipes using duck eggs. What's behind the fast-growing interest in raising ducks? An increasing awareness of the superior nutrition and taste of duck eggs (compared to chicken eggs) and a desire for a personal connection with the foods we feed our families. Foodies and chefs are embracing the appeal of duck eggs. And many doctors recommend duck eggs for people allergic to chicken eggs.
Offers information on how to successfully care for and raise healthy chickens.
Welcome to a world where chickens and gardens coexist! Join Lisa Steele, chicken-keeper extraordinaire and founder of Fresh Eggs Daily, on a unique journey through the garden. Start by planning your garden and learning strategies and tips for keeping your plants safe while they grow. Plant with purpose, choosing from a dozen plans for theme gardens such as Orange Egg Yolks or Nesting Box Herbs. Or choose a design that's filled with edibles - sharing the bounty with your family and your feathered friends. Then comes the fun part: enjoy the harvest, even let the chickens graze! Lisa's friendly writing, together with inspirational photos and illustrations, will have you rolling up your sleeves and reaching for your gardening tools. Lisa also covers a range of topics just for chicken-keepers, including: - Chickens and composting - Using chickens to aerate and till - Coop window boxes - Plants to avoid when you have chickens - Lists of the most valuable crops and herbs - Advice on how to harvest and use many of the plants - And much more! Whether you're an experienced chicken keeper, master gardener, or just getting into these two wonderful hobbies, Gardening with Chickens is an indispensable guide for a harmonious homestead.
A Beginner’s Guide to Keeping Ducks - Keeping Ducks in Your Backyard Table of Contents Introduction Raising Ducks in Your Backyard Choosing Ducks Dabbling Ducks and Diving Ducks Incubation of Ducklings Artificial Incubation Brooding Cleaning duck eggs Ducks and drakes Housing Your Ducks How to Make a Grass Run Keeping a Small Flock Traditional House Dimensions Preventing Flight over Netting Breeding Ducks for the Table. Preparing Ducklings Ducks and Water Feeding Your Ducks. Layers Mash for Ducks What is Grass Meal? What is Bean Meal? Drinking Water Conclusion Author Bio Introduction It must have been somewhere, and some time millenniums ago, when man found that the Mallard and Muscovy that he hunted in the marshes, and brought home to his family was a bird which could be domesticated. One is not very certain about which particular civilization decided that duck brought up in your own farmyard, was a good source of eating for the whole family. Roast duck, broiled duck, duck with seasonings and herbs, even wild duck, along with their cousins, the geese and the swans made excellent fare especially during times, when other food resources were not so easily available. Geese and swans are definitely not considered ducks, though they belong to the same family. The original ancestral species is the same, even though the characteristics differ. Geese and swans are larger in size and can be found in seawater, as well as in freshwater. Ducks are smaller in size, but prefer freshwater habitats. In the same manner, you should not confuse ducks with other aquatic birds like divers, coots and grebes. All of them are good eating, but they are unrelated, except for their liking for water. Apart from the meat content and eggs, ducks have also been reared for their soft down. Drakes are larger in size, when compared to the female ducks. Some of the popular species are Muscovy ducks, Mallards Paradise Shelduck and Aylesbury . The bills are long, broad and sometimes, they are serrated so that the ducks can feed on easily filtered aquatic plant and animal species. A duck shoot has always been a popular occupation of people who enjoy hunting for gain, especially when you are shooting these birds on the wing. A duck cannot fly when it is molting, and it normally molts before the duck group’s migration to a warmer climate.
Presents information on twenty-three domestic North American breeds, covering such topics as duck attributes, anatomy, behavior, colors, incubation, rearing ducklings, diet, butching, health, and guidelines for showing.
Written by hobby farmer Cherie Langlois from Washington state, Ducks is a fantastic overview of these entertaining and adaptable waterfowl. The author begins by asking “What do these water-crazy birds have that make them as much an asset to farms as landlubbing poultry?” She provides many answers that defend the virtues and versatility of ducks and argues that the duck is superior to the ubiquitous chicken in many ways. As a zoologist, Langlois has a gift for elucidating the details of the waterfowl’s anatomy, traits and behavior, all revealed in the first chapter “Meet the Duck.” She proceeds by leading readers through the process of choosing the right ducks for their hobby farm, considering the various domestic breeds (from bantams to heavyweights) as well as the sex of the birds and number of birds/breeds ideal for beginning a hobby-farm flock. The book offers advice on housing these very adaptable birds that thrive in various climates and regions throughout the world: space requirements, ventilation, flooring, feeders, and fencing. Naturally, ducks need water to thrive in the form of an existing lake, a manmade pond or simple duck pools, all discussed in the housing chapter. “The Duck Diet” chapter discusses the nutritional needs of the flock and various feeding options farmers and ranchers can consider. Seasoned duck aficionados interested in getting into the business of ducklings will find much information in the breeding chapter, which catalogs methods for hatching, incubators, mama duck and baby care, and more. The health of livestock is always a major consideration for the hobby farmer, and the chapter “Flock Health and Handling” offers a mini course in disease prevention, proper hygiene, recognizing symptoms of illnesses, and dealing with common maladies. The advantages of duck farming—the superior quality of duck eggs, down, and meat--are the focal point of the final chapter “Harvesting the Rewards,” likely the first chapter the dubious duck farmer will read prior to taking the dive into ducks. The book concludes with appendices of endangered duck breeds and duck diseases, resources, a glossary of terms, and a complete index.
Growing your own vegetables often leads gardeners to want to go one step further and keep some livestock. Chickens, ducks and bees are the most likely candidates for the first time livestock owner - especially if you live in a town or have only a small amount of land. They can all be kept happily together. Keeping these animals is a fun and absorbing hobby and is a great antidote to stress. There is nothing more rewarding than the collection of your own fresh eggs and honey. The book is full of sound, practical advice and looks at exactly what you need to get started: the equipment, housing, space and feed. Taking the breeds best suited for the smaller garden, town garden, or allotment, the responsible care and management of these animals is thoroughly covered in a friendly, approachable style with their welfare always in mind. Chickens: from breed selection to housing, feeding, care, and health issues this book provides simple, no nonsense information about how hens live, their needs and lifestyle and how to keep happy, healthy and productive hens. Ducks: here is all you need to know to introduce these entertaining animals to the garden - their walking requirements, their feed, and the surprisingly small amount of water they need. Duck eggs are great for baking and this book shows you how to keep your ducks happy and laying. Bees: there are many more people now interested in keeping bees. Paul Peacock shows you how to get started, where to get help, what equipment you need, and how to handle bees and harvest their honey. It emphasises gentle bees, and covers the control of varroa and other potential bee diseases.

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