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This impressive collection of original essays explores the relationship between social conflict and the environment - a topic that has received little attention within criminology. The chapters provide a systematic and comprehensive introduction and overview of conflict situations stemming from human exploitation of environments, as well as the impact of social conflicts on the wellbeing and health of specific species and ecosystems. Largely informed by green criminology perspectives, the chapters in the book are intended to stimulate new understandings of the relationships between humans and nature through critical evaluation of environmental destruction and degradation associated with social conflicts occurring around the world. With a goal of creating a typology of environment-social conflict relationships useful for green criminological research, this study is essential reading for scholars and academics in criminology, as well as those interested in crime, law and justice.
This book brings together the findings of a multi-disciplinary and international research project on environmental crime in Europe, funded by the European Union (EU). “European Union Action to Fight Environmental Crime" (EFFACE) was a 40-month research project that included eleven European research institutions and think tanks and was led by Ecologic Institute Berlin. EFFACE assessed the impacts of environmental crime as well as effective and feasible policy options for combating it from a multidisciplinary perspective, with a focus on the EU. As part of this project, numerous instances of environmental crime within and outside of the EU were studied and are now presented in this volume. This edited collection is highly innovative in showing not only the many facets of environmental crime, but also how it should be conceptualised and the consequences. An original and rigorous study, this book will be of particular interest to policy makers and scholars of green criminology and environmental studies.
This book brings the visual dimension of environmental crimes and harms into the field of green criminology. It shows how photographic images can provide a means for eliciting narratives from people who live in polluted areas – describing in detail and from their point of view what they know, think and feel about the reality in which they find themselves living. Natali makes the argument for developing a visual approach for green criminology, with a single case-study as its central focus, revealing the importance of using photo elicitation to appreciate and enhance the reflexive and active role of social actors in the symbolic and social construction of their environmental experiences. Examining the multiple interactions between the images and the words used to describe the socio-environmental worlds in which we live, this book is a call to open the eyes of green criminology to wider and richer explorations of environmental harms and crimes. An innovative and engaging study, this text will be of particular interest to scholars of environmental crime and cultural, green and visual criminologies.
Over the last two decades, "green criminology" has emerged as a unique area of study, bringing together criminologists and sociologists from a wide range of research backgrounds and varying theoretical orientations. It spans the micro to the macro—from individual-level environmental crimes and victimization to business/corporate violations and state transgressions. There have been few attempts, however, to explicitly or implicitly integrate cultural criminology into green criminology (or vice versa). This book moves towards articulating a green cultural criminological perspective. Brisman and South examine existing overlapping research and offer a platform to support future excursions by green criminologists into cultural criminology’s concern with media images and representations, consumerism and consumption, and resistance. At the same time, they offer an invitation to cultural criminologists to adopt a green view of the consumption landscape and the growth (and depictions) of environmental harms. Green Cultural Criminology is aimed at students, academics, criminologists, and sociologists with an interest in green criminology and cultural criminology: two of the most exciting new areas in criminology today.
This book explores how young people perceive the severity of crime and delinquency. It particularly addresses whom or what they consider to be the victims of crime and delinquency, how they analyze and assess appropriate responses by the criminal justice system, as well as their place within it. The book proposes tools for developing a more elaborate and robust understanding of what constitutes crime, identifying those affected by it, and what is deemed adequate or appropriate punishment. In so doing, it offers thick description of young peoples' conceptions of and experiences with crime, delinquency, justice and law, and uses this description to interrogate the role of the state in influencing - indeed, shaping - these perceptions.
Environmental crime is one of the most profitable and fastest growing areas of international criminal activity. These types of crime, however, do not always produce an immediate consequence, and the harm may be diffused. As such, the complexity of victimization - in terms of time, space, impact, and who or what is victimized - is one of the reasons why governments and the enforcement community have trouble in finding suitable and effective responses. This book provides a diverse and provocative array of arguments, critiques and recommendations from leading researchers and scholars in the field of green criminology. The chapters are divided into three main sections: the first part deals with specific characteristics of some of the major types of environmental crime and its perpetrators; the second focuses explicitly on the problem of victimization in cases of environmental crime; and the third addresses the question of how to tackle this problem. Discussing these topics from the point of view of green criminological theory, sociology, law enforcement, community wellbeing, environmental activism and victimology, this book will be of great interest to all those concerned about crime and the environment.
Explores the ways in which governments, transnational corporations, military apparatuses and ordinary people routinely harm environments, other animals and humanity.

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