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This volume brings together selected papers commissioned and published by the Cardiff Centre for Ethics, Law & Society and includes contributions from international experts on topics including agriculture, ethics and bioethics.
This volume forms part of a series exploring key issues in ethics, law and society, published in association with the Cardiff Centre for Ethics, Law and Society. The works collectively address new technological, social and regulatory developments and the fresh ethical dilemmas these pose, and also critically compel an urgent revisiting of social and legal issues that were once the subject of controversy but which have now fallen out of the line of sight of academics, politicians and policy-makers. This fifth and final volume brings the series to a close and is dedicated to the memory of Dr Jennifer Gunning.
'Caring and the Law' considers the law's response to caring. It explores how care is valued and recognised, how it is regulated and restricted and how the values of caring are reflected in the law. It does this by examining the law's interaction with caring in a wide range of fields including family, medical, welfare, criminal and tort law. At the heart of the book is the claim that the law has failed to recognise the importance of caring in many areas and in doing so has led to the costs and burdens of care falling on those who provide it, primarily women. It has also meant that the law has failed to protect those who receive care from the abuse that can take place in a caring context. The book promotes an ethic of care as providing an ethical and conceptual framework for the law to respond to caring relationships.
The essays selected for this volume focus on issues that arise when attempting to design, review and undertake research involving human participants who are experiencing a private or public emergency. The main themes discussed by the essays are: the distinctive and significant ethical questions as to how research participants can be treated during emergency settings; the ethical challenges raised by emergencies for researchers undertaking research and its effects on the nature of research pursued; and procedural obstacles raised by emergencies which can affect the quality of good research ethics review. The volume is unique in that it is the first collection to exclusively deal with all of the central ethical aspects of conducting human subject research in the context of emergency.
A focus on the way in which Muslim scholars of the Hanafite school of Muslim law, from the 10th-12th centuries, adapted their legal norms to changing circumstances and distinguished between legal and ethical norms, religious and legal status, legal propositions and religious judgment. The introduction links this debate to the sociology of law and spells out the distinction between theology and law in Islam.
This volume explores the principles that govern moral responsibility and legal liability for omissive conduct. Many of this book's contributors try to make sense of the possibility of moral responsibility for omissions, including those that occur unwittingly. The disagreements among them concern the grounds of moral responsibility in these cases: the constellation of states and traits that constitute the self, or the quality of one's will, or exercises of evaluative judgment, or the ability and opportunity to avoid the omission, or the tracing back to a time when one had the witting ability to take steps to avoid future omission. Some contributors consider whether omissions need to be under one's control if one is to be morally responsible for them, as well as which sense of "control" is relevant, if it is, to the question of moral responsibility. Yet others consider whether it is possible for an agent to be morally responsible for an omission that she could not have avoided. On the legal side, the volume also considers various issues concerning the status of omissions in the law: whether circumstances that are usually described as involving legal liability for omissions are better described as involving legal liability for entire courses of conduct; the conditions (such as creation of the peril) under which one can be legally liable for an omission to rescue; why a defendant's legal guilt for a crime can be predicated on an omission to act only if the defendant was under a legal duty to engage in the omitted act; and whether this "duty requirement" is grounded in the desirability of shielding from legal liability those who are not criminally culpable or in the constraint that one's body and property may not be appropriated for the general good.
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