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Linear models are central to the practice of statistics and form the foundation of a vast range of statistical methodologies. Julian J. Faraway's critically acclaimed Linear Models with R examined regression and analysis of variance, demonstrated the different methods available, and showed in which situations each one applies. Following in those footsteps, Extending the Linear Model with R surveys the techniques that grow from the regression model, presenting three extensions to that framework: generalized linear models (GLMs), mixed effect models, and nonparametric regression models. The author's treatment is thoroughly modern and covers topics that include GLM diagnostics, generalized linear mixed models, trees, and even the use of neural networks in statistics. To demonstrate the interplay of theory and practice, throughout the book the author weaves the use of the R software environment to analyze the data of real examples, providing all of the R commands necessary to reproduce the analyses. All of the data described in the book is available at http://people.bath.ac.uk/jjf23/ELM/ Statisticians need to be familiar with a broad range of ideas and techniques. This book provides a well-stocked toolbox of methodologies, and with its unique presentation of these very modern statistical techniques, holds the potential to break new ground in the way graduate-level courses in this area are taught.
A Hands-On Way to Learning Data Analysis Part of the core of statistics, linear models are used to make predictions and explain the relationship between the response and the predictors. Understanding linear models is crucial to a broader competence in the practice of statistics. Linear Models with R, Second Edition explains how to use linear models in physical science, engineering, social science, and business applications. The book incorporates several improvements that reflect how the world of R has greatly expanded since the publication of the first edition. New to the Second Edition Reorganized material on interpreting linear models, which distinguishes the main applications of prediction and explanation and introduces elementary notions of causality Additional topics, including QR decomposition, splines, additive models, Lasso, multiple imputation, and false discovery rates Extensive use of the ggplot2 graphics package in addition to base graphics Like its widely praised, best-selling predecessor, this edition combines statistics and R to seamlessly give a coherent exposition of the practice of linear modeling. The text offers up-to-date insight on essential data analysis topics, from estimation, inference, and prediction to missing data, factorial models, and block designs. Numerous examples illustrate how to apply the different methods using R.
Start Analyzing a Wide Range of Problems Since the publication of the bestselling, highly recommended first edition, R has considerably expanded both in popularity and in the number of packages available. Extending the Linear Model with R: Generalized Linear, Mixed Effects and Nonparametric Regression Models, Second Edition takes advantage of the greater functionality now available in R and substantially revises and adds several topics. New to the Second Edition Expanded coverage of binary and binomial responses, including proportion responses, quasibinomial and beta regression, and applied considerations regarding these models New sections on Poisson models with dispersion, zero inflated count models, linear discriminant analysis, and sandwich and robust estimation for generalized linear models (GLMs) Revised chapters on random effects and repeated measures that reflect changes in the lme4 package and show how to perform hypothesis testing for the models using other methods New chapter on the Bayesian analysis of mixed effect models that illustrates the use of STAN and presents the approximation method of INLA Revised chapter on generalized linear mixed models to reflect the much richer choice of fitting software now available Updated coverage of splines and confidence bands in the chapter on nonparametric regression New material on random forests for regression and classification Revamped R code throughout, particularly the many plots using the ggplot2 package Revised and expanded exercises with solutions now included Demonstrates the Interplay of Theory and Practice This textbook continues to cover a range of techniques that grow from the linear regression model. It presents three extensions to the linear framework: GLMs, mixed effect models, and nonparametric regression models. The book explains data analysis using real examples and includes all the R commands necessary to reproduce the analyses.
Generalized Linear Mixed Models: Modern Concepts, Methods and Applications presents an introduction to linear modeling using the generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) as an overarching conceptual framework. For readers new to linear models, the book helps them see the big picture. It shows how linear models fit with the rest of the core statistics curriculum and points out the major issues that statistical modelers must consider. Along with describing common applications of GLMMs, the text introduces the essential theory and main methodology associated with linear models that accommodate random model effects and non-Gaussian data. Unlike traditional linear model textbooks that focus on normally distributed data, this one adopts a generalized mixed model approach throughout: data for linear modeling need not be normally distributed and effects may be fixed or random. With numerous examples using SAS® PROC GLIMMIX, this book is ideal for graduate students in statistics, statistics professionals seeking to update their knowledge, and researchers new to the generalized linear model thought process. It focuses on data-driven processes and provides context for extending traditional linear model thinking to generalized linear mixed modeling. See Professor Stroup discuss the book.
Bridging the gap between theory and practice for modern statistical model building, Introduction to General and Generalized Linear Models presents likelihood-based techniques for statistical modelling using various types of data. Implementations using R are provided throughout the text, although other software packages are also discussed. Numerous examples show how the problems are solved with R. After describing the necessary likelihood theory, the book covers both general and generalized linear models using the same likelihood-based methods. It presents the corresponding/parallel results for the general linear models first, since they are easier to understand and often more well known. The authors then explore random effects and mixed effects in a Gaussian context. They also introduce non-Gaussian hierarchical models that are members of the exponential family of distributions. Each chapter contains examples and guidelines for solving the problems via R. Providing a flexible framework for data analysis and model building, this text focuses on the statistical methods and models that can help predict the expected value of an outcome, dependent, or response variable. It offers a sound introduction to general and generalized linear models using the popular and powerful likelihood techniques. Ancillary materials are available at www.imm.dtu.dk/~hm/GLM
This book focuses on tools and techniques for building regression models using real-world data and assessing their validity. A key theme throughout the book is that it makes sense to base inferences or conclusions only on valid models. Plots are shown to be an important tool for both building regression models and assessing their validity. We shall see that deciding what to plot and how each plot should be interpreted will be a major challenge. In order to overcome this challenge we shall need to understand the mathematical properties of the fitted regression models and associated diagnostic procedures. As such this will be an area of focus throughout the book. In particular, we shall carefully study the properties of resi- als in order to understand when patterns in residual plots provide direct information about model misspecification and when they do not. The regression output and plots that appear throughout the book have been gen- ated using R. The output from R that appears in this book has been edited in minor ways. On the book web site you will find the R code used in each example in the text.
Designed for a one-semester advanced undergraduate or graduate course, Statistical Theory: A Concise Introduction clearly explains the underlying ideas and principles of major statistical concepts, including parameter estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, asymptotic analysis, Bayesian inference, and elements of decision theory. It introduces these topics on a clear intuitive level using illustrative examples in addition to the formal definitions, theorems, and proofs. Based on the authors’ lecture notes, this student-oriented, self-contained book maintains a proper balance between the clarity and rigor of exposition. In a few cases, the authors present a "sketched" version of a proof, explaining its main ideas rather than giving detailed technical mathematical and probabilistic arguments. Chapters and sections marked by asterisks contain more advanced topics and may be omitted. A special chapter on linear models shows how the main theoretical concepts can be applied to the well-known and frequently used statistical tool of linear regression. Requiring no heavy calculus, simple questions throughout the text help students check their understanding of the material. Each chapter also includes a set of exercises that range in level of difficulty.

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