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For more than thirty years, Don Mosley has traveled the globe, working for the cause of justice on behalf of two organizations he helped to found: Habitat for Humanity and Jubilee Partners, a community of believers who have welcomed 3,000 refugees from danger zones around the world. In this book, he uses stories from his remarkable walk of faith to issue an action call for Christians to live out the teachings of Jesus, no matter where they take us or what they require us to do.
This book migrates through continents, regions, nations, and villages, in order to tell the stories of diverse kinds of nomadic dwellers. It departs from Africa, en routes itself toward Asia, Oceania, Europe, and culminates in the Americas, with the territories of Latin America, Canada, and the United States. The volume travels through worn out pathways of migration that continue to be threaded upon today, and theologically reflects on a wide range of migratory aims that result also in diverse forms of indigenization of Christianity. Among the main issues being considered are: How have globalization and migration affected the theological self-understanding of Christianity? In light of globalization and migration, how is the evangelizing mission of Christianity to be understood and carried out? What ecclesiastical reforms if any are required to enable the church to meet present-day challenges?
Migration has become a defining feature of the contemporary age. It has brought about significant changes in political, economic, social, and religious landscapes. This volume explores a question that has been little considered to date: how are churches being transformed in the face of global migration? The book features contributors from diverse national, denominational, cultural, professional, and linguistic backgrounds. Their essays reveal the ways in which migrants and the phenomenon of migration expose longstanding gaps and failings within Christian communities. However, the prevalence of migration and migrants simultaneously opens up fresh possibilities for churches to grow, renew, becoming more authentic, dynamic, and diverse. Church in an Age of Global Migration presents a collage of embodied ecclesial practices, understandings, and realities that have emerged and are continuing to develop in the face of global migration. Committed to transnational and ecumenical dialogue, and to integrating practical and theoretical perspectives, this volume is the first to offer an in-depth analysis of the ways in which churches are being changed by migrants.
It started simply. The pastor stood outside her church and greeted the workers as they came in from the fields. She spoke to them in Spanish and they responded. Soon a bridge was forged. This is the true story of a rural community in Northern California who awakened to the migrant farm workers in their community—and chose to embrace them. Led by one extraordinary woman who was bolstered by her deep and abiding faith, the community offered “radical hospitality” to the strangers in its midst. And in doing so, they discovered an important truth—that our common humanity binds us all.
The Abingdon Old Testament Commentaries provide compact, critical commentaries on the books of the Old Testament for the use of theological students and pastors. The commentaries are also useful for upper-level college or university students and for those responsible for teaching in congregational settings. In addition to providing basic information and insights into the Old Testament writings, these commentaries exemplify the tasks and procedures of careful interpretation, to assist students of the Old Testament in coming to an informed and critical engagement with the biblical texts themselves. Jeremiah has a reputation for being one of the most difficult books in the Bible to read. Despite its dense and jumbled appearance, Stulman shows that Jeremiah is far more than a random accumulation of miscellaneous materials. Jeremiah is an artistic and symbolic tapestry held together by prose seams. In the first commentary to give the prose literature such strong attention, Stulman explains how the prophetic book reenacts the dismantling of Israel's most cherished social and symbolic systems. In doing so it speaks poignantly of the horrors of war and military occupation, as well as the resultant despair and anger. Siege and deportation, however, do not signal the end for the people of God. As Jeremiah unfolds, seeds of hope begin to emerge. Such hope asserts that massive wreckage does not nullify God's love, that oppressive and murderous forces will not ultimately triumph, and that the suffering and sovereign God will sculpt new beginnings out of the ruin of fallen worlds.
The Phenomenology of Spirit was Hegel's grandest experiment, changing our vision of the world and the very nature of philosophical enterprise. In this book, Solomon captures the bold and exhilarating spirit, presenting the Phenomenology as a thoroughly personal as well as philosophical work. He begins with a historical introduction, which lays the groundwork for a section-by-section analysis of the Phenomenology. Both the initiated and readers unacquainted with the intricacies of German idealism will find this to be an accessible and exciting introduction to this great philosopher's monumental work.

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