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Fantastic Stories of the Imagination was newly revived by Hugo and World Fantasy Award nominated editor Warren Lapine as a webzine in 2014. Fantastic Stories brings you the very best in science fiction and fantasy with a blend of original fiction, reprints, and criticism of the field. Each month a new issue is posted free on the web for all to read at www.fantasticstoriesoftheimagination.com back issues may also be purchased either as e-books or print editions. Collected here are all of the original stories that ran in 2014. "New Beaches" by Daniel Hatch: Power, corruption, and danger rise with the tides. "Invisible Friends" by Steven Sawicki: He's just an all American boy with a dog that loves to drive his car, some talking monkeys, and a few damned aliens. "Invisible Friends Too (Or, I Have No Bananas and Ice Must Cream): by Steven Sawiki: Monkeys, aliens, and Elvis . . . oh my. "Rope Burns" by Kelly McCullough: He had a secret to keep, but then don't we all? "Night of Apophis" by Brenda Kalt: Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die. "Chocolateland" by Shariann Lewitt: When they wanted to eat, to really enjoy a good pig out, they could go to Chocolateland
FINALIST FOR THE PULITZER PRIZE • NATIONAL BESTSELLER • A bewitching story collection from a writer hailed as “the most darkly playful voice in American fiction” (Michael Chabon) and “a national treasure” (Neil Gaiman). NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY BookPage • BuzzFeed • Chicago Tribune • Kirkus Reviews • NPR • San Francisco Chronicle • Slate • Time • Toronto Star • The Washington Post She has been hailed by Michael Chabon as “the most darkly playful voice in American fiction” and by Neil Gaiman as “a national treasure.” Now Kelly Link’s eagerly awaited new collection—her first for adult readers in a decade—proves indelibly that this bewitchingly original writer is among the finest we have. Link has won an ardent following for her ability, with each new short story, to take readers deeply into an unforgettable, brilliantly constructed fictional universe. The nine exquisite examples in this collection show her in full command of her formidable powers. In “The Summer People,” a young girl in rural North Carolina serves as uneasy caretaker to the mysterious, never-quite-glimpsed visitors who inhabit the cottage behind her house. In “I Can See Right Through You,” a middle-aged movie star makes a disturbing trip to the Florida swamp where his former on- and off-screen love interest is shooting a ghost-hunting reality show. In “The New Boyfriend,” a suburban slumber party takes an unusual turn, and a teenage friendship is tested, when the spoiled birthday girl opens her big present: a life-size animated doll. Hurricanes, astronauts, evil twins, bootleggers, Ouija boards, iguanas, The Wizard of Oz, superheroes, the Pyramids . . . These are just some of the talismans of an imagination as capacious and as full of wonder as that of any writer today. But as fantastical as these stories can be, they are always grounded by sly humor and an innate generosity of feeling for the frailty—and the hidden strengths—of human beings. In Get in Trouble, this one-of-a-kind talent expands the boundaries of what short fiction can do. Praise for Get in Trouble “Ridiculously brilliant . . . These stories make you laugh while staring into the void.”—The Boston Globe “When it comes to literary magic, Link is the real deal: clever, surprising, affecting, fluid and funny.”—San Francisco Chronicle
The short fiction of a writer who helped to shape the course of American literature. With a determined commitment to the history of his native land, Nathaniel Hawthorne revealed, more incisively than any writer of his generation, the nature of a distinctly American consciousness. The pieces collected here deal with essentially American matters: the Puritan past, the Indians, the Revolution. But Hawthorne was highly - often wickedly - unorthodox in his account of life in early America, and his precisely constructed plots quickly engage the reader's imagination. Written in the 1820s, 30s, and 40s, these works are informed by themes that reappear in Hawthorne's longer works: The Scarlet Letter, The House of the Seven Gables and The Blithedale Romance. And, as Michael J. Colacurcio points out in his excellent introduction, they are themes that are now deeply embedded in the American literary tradition.
Vowing to return to his father--the city storyteller--his lost gift of speech, Haroun begins a quest that introduces him to a mad bus driver, the Shadow Warriors, and the land of darkness.
A book of fantastic stories about the hell on earth that is living.
A follow-up collection to Stranger Things Happen celebrates the intersection between the worlds of reality and the supernatural, in an anthology that features such topics as a haunted convenience store and a weekly apocalyptic poker party. Reprint.
Winner of the PEN Open Book Award An NPR Best Book of 2016 A Washington Post Notable Fiction Pick A PBS NewsHour Best Book of 2016 A Slate Best Book of the Year One of Esquire Magazine’s Best Books of 2016 One of Oprah.com’s 10 Favorite Books of 2016 "Transcendent." —The New York Times Book Review "Flawless. . . another masterpiece from an author who seems incapable of writing anything that's less than brilliant." —NPR From the award-winning author of Boy, Snow, Bird and Mr. Fox comes an enchanting collection of intertwined stories. Playful, ambitious, and exquisitely imagined, What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours is cleverly built around the idea of keys, literal and metaphorical. The key to a house, the key to a heart, the key to a secret—Oyeyemi’s keys not only unlock elements of her characters’ lives, they promise further labyrinths on the other side. In “Books and Roses” one special key opens a library, a garden, and clues to at least two lovers’ fates. In “Is Your Blood as Red as This?” an unlikely key opens the heart of a student at a puppeteering school. “‘Sorry’ Doesn’t Sweeten Her Tea” involves a “house of locks,” where doors can be closed only with a key—with surprising, unobservable developments. And in “If a Book Is Locked There’s Probably a Good Reason for That Don't You Think,” a key keeps a mystical diary locked (for good reason). Oyeyemi’s tales span multiple times and landscapes as they tease boundaries between coexisting realities. Is a key a gate, a gift, or an invitation? What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours captivates as it explores the many possible answers.

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