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The author of the #1 New York Times bestseller, The Revenant--basis for the award-winning motion picture starring Leonardo DiCaprio--tells the remarkable story of the worst hard-rock mining disaster in American history. The worst hard-rock mining disaster in American history began a half hour before midnight on June 8, 1917, when fire broke out in the North Butte Mining Company's Granite Mountain shaft. Sparked more than two thousand feet below ground, the fire spewed flames, smoke, and poisonous gas through a labyrinth of underground tunnels. Within an hour, more than four hundred men would be locked in a battle to survive. Within three days, one hundred and sixty-four of them would be dead. Fire and Brimstone recounts the remarkable stories of both the men below ground and their families above, focusing on two groups of miners who made the incredible decision to entomb themselves to escape the gas. While the disaster is compelling in its own right, Fire and Brimstone also tells a far broader story striking in its contemporary relevance. Butte, Montana, on the eve of the North Butte disaster, was a volatile jumble of antiwar protest, an abusive corporate master, seething labor unrest, divisive ethnic tension, and radicalism both left and right. It was a powder keg lacking only a spark, and the mine fire would ignite strikes, murder, ethnic and political witch hunts, occupation by federal troops, and ultimately a battle over presidential power.
When billionaire's daughter Alison Wolff disappears following a massacre at a party, nobody knows if she has been kidnapped or killed. Dan Starkey is hired to find the missing student but instead is drawn into a violent struggle between rival gangs. A drugs war is tearing the city apart and in response, a new church movement has sprung up. But when a controversial new abortion clinic is firebombed, Dan is asked to prove their involvement. In a Belfast rapidly descending back into chaos, Dan is left with an impossible choice - betray his client or risk losing his family...
Gemälde als Flucht aus der kalten Realität - »Palast der Erinnerungen« von Debra Dean Die junge Marina ist Museumsführerin in der berühmten Leningrader Eremitage. Früher umgaben sie faszinierende Gemälde und die tiefe Zuneigung des Mannes, den sie liebt. Nun aber, im Winter 1941, ist sie allein und die Museumssäle sind leer. In der Stadt herrschen Hunger, Not und Verzweiflung. Doch Marina hat ihren eigenen Weg gefunden, das Elend zu ertragen: Sie geht von Saal zu Saal und erinnert sich der Meisterwerke, die vor dem Krieg dort hingen. Sie sieht anmutige Gesten, betörende Farben, die Strahlkraft des Lichts. So entsteht in Marina das ganze Museum zu neuem Leben. Vor allem die Erinnerung an die Madonnenbilder und ihre Schönheit lassen sie alles überleben. Jahrzehnte später sind es wieder die Madonnenbilder, die ihr Trost spenden. Marina, deren Gedächtnis sie immer häufiger im Stich lässt, flüchtet sich erneut zu den Bildern und erlebt noch einmal Geborgenheit und Glück. »Was für ein tröstlicher Gedanke, den Debra Dean ihrem Romandebüt »Palast der Erinnerungen« zugrunde gelegt hat: Es ist die Schönheit der Kunst, die jede Finsternis erhellt. Nach der Lektüre dieses Buches glaubt man fest daran.« - Brigitte Begeisterte Leserstimmen: »Ein Buch über Liebe, Schönheit und über die Kraft der Imagination. Volle Punktzahl(...).« »Hier ist alles vereint, was einem Roman Spannung, Dynamik und die nötige Dramatik verleiht.« »Liebevoll, romantisch, anrührend und realistisch...«
Montana's cowboys, miners, foresters, farmers and nurses entered World War I in April 1917 under the battle cry that would resonate on the battlefields in France--"Powder River, Let 'Er Buck!" Montana men served in a greater percentage per capita than any other state. Hundreds responded to the call, including local women and minorities, from the nation's first congresswoman, Jeannette Rankin, to young women serving as combat nurses on the front lines. Additionally, the state provided vital supplies of copper and wheat. Learn what role celebrities like "cowboy artist" Charlie Russell played in the war and how Montanans mobilized, trained and deployed. Acclaimed historian Ken Robison uncovers new and neglected stories of the Treasure State's contributions to the Great War.
In 2015, Bob Dylan said, "I learned lyrics and how to write them from listening to folk songs. And I played them, and I met other people that played them, back when nobody was doing it. Sang nothing but these folk songs, and they gave me the code for everything that's fair game, that everything belongs to everyone." In Hear My Sad Story, Richard Polenberg describes the historical events that led to the writing of many famous American folk songs that served as touchstones for generations of American musicians, lyricists, and folklorists. Those events, which took place from the early nineteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries, often involved tragic occurrences: murders, sometimes resulting from love affairs gone wrong; desperate acts borne out of poverty and unbearable working conditions; and calamities such as railroad crashes, shipwrecks, and natural disasters. All of Polenberg's account of the songs in the book are grounded in historical fact and illuminate the social history of the times. Reading these tales of sorrow, misfortune, and regret puts us in touch with the dark but terribly familiar side of American history. On Christmas 1895 in St. Louis, an African American man named Lee Shelton, whose nickname was "Stack Lee," shot and killed William Lyons in a dispute over seventy-five cents and a hat. Shelton was sent to prison until 1911, committed another murder upon his release, and died in a prison hospital in 1912. Even during his lifetime, songs were being written about Shelton, and eventually 450 versions of his story would be recorded. As the song—you may know Shelton as Stagolee or Stagger Lee—was shared and adapted, the emotions of the time were preserved, but the fact that the songs described real people, real lives, often fell by the wayside. Polenberg returns us to the men and women who, in song, became legends. The lyrics serve as valuable historical sources, providing important information about what had happened, why, and what it all meant. More important, they reflect the character of American life and the pathos elicited by the musical memory of these common and troubled lives.
The place: The steep mountains outside Salt Lake City. The time: The first decade of the twentieth century. The man: Daniel Jackling, a young metallurgical engineer. The goal: A bold new technology that could provide billions of pounds of cheap copper for a rapidly electrifying America. The result: Bingham's enormous "Glory Hole," the first large-scale open-pit copper mine, an enormous chasm in the earth and one of the largest humanmade artifacts on the planet. Mass Destruction is the compelling story of Jackling and the development of open-pit hard rock mining, its role in the wiring of an electrified America, as well its devastating environmental consequences. Mass destruction mining soon spread around the nation and the globe, providing raw materials essential to the mass production and mass consumption that increasingly defined the emerging "American way of life." At the dawn of the last century, Jackling's open pit replaced immense but constricted underground mines that probed nearly a mile beneath the earth, to become the ultimate symbol of the modern faith that science and technology could overcome all natural limits. A new culture of mass destruction emerged that promised nearly infinite supplies not only of copper, but also of coal, timber, fish, and other natural resources. But, what were the consequences? Timothy J. LeCain deftly analyzes how open-pit mining continues to affect the environment in its ongoing devastation of nature and commodification of the physical world. The nation's largest toxic Superfund site would be one effect, as well as other types of environmental dead zones around the globe. Yet today, as the world's population races toward American levels of resource consumption, truly viable alternatives to the technology of mass destruction have not yet emerged.

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