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Fixed Effects Regression Methods for Longitudinal Data Using SAS, written by Paul Allison, is an invaluable resource for all researchers interested in adding fixed effects regression methods to their tool kit of statistical techniques. First introduced by economists, fixed effects methods are gaining widespread use throughout the social sciences. Designed to eliminate major biases from regression models with multiple observations (usually longitudinal) for each subject (usually a person), fixed effects methods essentially offer control for all stable characteristics of the subjects, even characteristics that are difficult or impossible to measure. This straightforward and thorough text shows you how to estimate fixed effects models with several SAS procedures that are appropriate for different kinds of outcome variables. The theoretical background of each model is explained, and the models are then illustrated with detailed examples using real data. The book contains thorough discussions of the following uses of SAS procedures: PROC GLM for estimating fixed effects linear models for quantitative outcomes, PROC LOGISTIC for estimating fixed effects logistic regression models, PROC PHREG for estimating fixed effects Cox regression models for repeated event data, PROC GENMOD for estimating fixed effects Poisson regression models for count data, and PROC CALIS for estimating fixed effects structural equation models. To gain the most benefit from this book, readers should be familiar with multiple linear regression, have practical experience using multiple regression on real data, and be comfortable interpreting the output from a regression analysis. An understanding of logistic regression and Poisson regression is a plus. Some experience with SAS is helpful, but not required. This book is part of the SAS Press program.
If you are a researcher or student with experience in multiple linear regression and want to learn about logistic regression, Paul Allison's Logistic Regression Using SAS: Theory and Application, Second Edition, is for you! Informal and nontechnical, this book both explains the theory behind logistic regression, and looks at all the practical details involved in its implementation using SAS. Several real-world examples are included in full detail. This book also explains the differences and similarities among the many generalizations of the logistic regression model. The following topics are covered: binary logistic regression, logit analysis of contingency tables, multinomial logit analysis, ordered logit analysis, discrete-choice analysis, and Poisson regression. Other highlights include discussions on how to use the GENMOD procedure to do loglinear analysis and GEE estimation for longitudinal binary data. Only basic knowledge of the SAS DATA step is assumed. The second edition describes many new features of PROC LOGISTIC, including conditional logistic regression, exact logistic regression, generalized logit models, ROC curves, the ODDSRATIO statement (for analyzing interactions), and the EFFECTPLOT statement (for graphing nonlinear effects). Also new is coverage of PROC SURVEYLOGISTIC (for complex samples), PROC GLIMMIX (for generalized linear mixed models), PROC QLIM (for selection models and heterogeneous logit models), and PROC MDC (for advanced discrete choice models). This book is part of the SAS Press program.
Working with longitudinal data introduces a unique set of challenges. Once you've mastered the art of performing calculations within a single observation of a data set, you're faced with the task of performing calculations or making comparisons between observations. It's easy to look backward in data sets, but how do you look forward and across observations? Ron Cody provides straightforward answers to these and other questions. Longitudinal Data and SAS details useful techniques for conducting operations between observations in a SAS data set. For quick reference, the book is conveniently organized to cover tools-an introduction to powerful SAS programming techniques for longitudinal data; case studies-a variety of illuminating examples that use Ron's techniques; and macros-detailed descriptions of helpful longitudinal data macros. Beginning to intermediate SAS users will appreciate this book's informative, easy-to-comprehend style. And users who frequently process longitudinal data will learn to make the most of their analyses by following Ron's methodologies.
Easy to read and comprehensive, Survival Analysis Using SAS: A Practical Guide, Second Edition, by Paul D. Allison, is an accessible, data-based introduction to methods of survival analysis. Researchers who want to analyze survival data with SAS will find just what they need with this fully updated new edition that incorporates the many enhancements in SAS procedures for survival analysis in SAS 9. Although the book assumes only a minimal knowledge of SAS, more experienced users will learn new techniques of data input and manipulation. Numerous examples of SAS code and output make this an eminently practical book, ensuring that even the uninitiated become sophisticated users of survival analysis. The main topics presented include censoring, survival curves, Kaplan-Meier estimation, accelerated failure time models, Cox regression models, and discrete-time analysis. Also included are topics not usually covered in survival analysis books, such as time-dependent covariates, competing risks, and repeated events. Survival Analysis Using SAS: A Practical Guide, Second Edition, has been thoroughly updated for SAS 9, and all figures are presented using ODS Graphics. This new edition also documents major enhancements to the STRATA statement in the LIFETEST procedure; includes a section on the PROBPLOT command, which offers graphical methods to evaluate the fit of each parametric regression model; introduces the new BAYES statement for both parametric and Cox models, which allows the user to do a Bayesian analysis using MCMC methods; demonstrates the use of the counting process syntax as an alternative method for handling time-dependent covariates; contains a section on cumulative incidence functions; and describes the use of the new GLIMMIX procedure to estimate random-effects models for discrete-time data. This book is part of the SAS Press program.
Statistical tools to analyze correlated binary data are spread out in the existing literature. This book makes these tools accessible to practitioners in a single volume. Chapters cover recently developed statistical tools and statistical packages that are tailored to analyzing correlated binary data. The authors showcase both traditional and new methods for application to health-related research. Data and computer programs will be publicly available in order for readers to replicate model development, but learning a new statistical language is not necessary with this book. The inclusion of code for R, SAS, and SPSS allows for easy implementation by readers. For readers interested in learning more about the languages, though, there are short tutorials in the appendix. Accompanying data sets are available for download through the book s website. Data analysis presented in each chapter will provide step-by-step instructions so these new methods can be readily applied to projects. Researchers and graduate students in Statistics, Epidemiology, and Public Health will find this book particularly useful.
This book demonstrates how to estimate and interpret fixed-effects models in a variety of different modeling contexts: linear models, logistic models, Poisson models, Cox regression models, and structural equation models. Both advantages and disadvantages of fixed-effects models will be considered, along with detailed comparisons with random-effects models. Written at a level appropriate for anyone who has taken a year of statistics, the book is appropriate as a supplement for graduate courses in regression or linear regression as well as an aid to researchers who have repeated measures or cross-sectional data. Learn more about "The Little Green Book" - QASS Series! Click Here
Alexander Schulze untersucht im vorliegenden Buch die finanziellen Folgen der Geburt von Kindern. Wir alle haben hierzu mehr oder minder klare Vorstell- gen. Je mehr Kinder in einem Haushalt leben, desto schlechter die wirtschaft- che Lage der Familien, darauf laufen unsere Meinungen meist hinaus. Wir st- zen uns dabei auf viele öffentliche Berichte und auf wenige Daten aus Qu- schnittsuntersuchungen. Sie belegen in der Tat, dass im Allgemeinen Familien mit steigender Kinderzahl schlechter finanziell ausgestattet sind. Ob dies aber tatsächlich mit der Geburt von Kindern zusammen hängt – oder nicht etwa Fa- lien in schlechterer Lage mehr Kinder bekommen oder vielleicht jahrelang - rück liegende schlechte Berufschancen der Eltern dafür verantwortlich sind – das können wir gar nicht wissen. Denn es lagen bisher keine Längsschnittstudien vor, die den direkten Einfluss von Geburten und Geburtenfolgen auf die fin- zielle Ausstattung der Familien erforschten. Obwohl wir im Grunde im Dunkeln tappen, sind Annahmen hierüber Grundlage vieler familienpolitischer Maßnahmen zur Familienförderung. So - ruht unter anderem die Kindergeldprogression auf der Vermutung, dass der Wohlstand von Familien besonders dann leidet, wenn mehr als zwei Kinder zur Welt kommen. Diese Annahme ist schlicht falsch, wie die empirische Län- schnittuntersuchung von Alexander Schulze zeigt. Vielmehr ist es die erste - burt, die dramatische finanzielle Auswirkungen hat, nicht die dritte und weitere. Was die vorliegende Schrift also besonders auszeichnet, sind Ergebnisse, die für die heutige öffentliche und politische Diskussion um die Familie von eminenter Bedeutung sind. Sie korrigieren manch falsche, selbst von Ministerien verbreitete Vorstellungen.

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