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This is the second volume in a four-part series on fluid dynamics: Part 1. Classical Fluid Dynamics Part 2. Asymptotic Problems of Fluid Dynamics Part 3. Boundary Layers Part 4. Hydrodynamic Stability Theory The series is designed to give a comprehensive and coherent description of fluid dynamics, starting with chapters on classical theory suitable for an introductory undergraduate lecture course, and then progressing through more advanced material up to the level of modern research in the field. In Part 2 the reader is introduced to asymptotic methods, and their applications to fluid dynamics. Firstly, it discusses the mathematical aspects of the asymptotic theory. This is followed by an exposition of the results of inviscid flow theory, starting with subsonic flows past thin aerofoils. This includes unsteady flow theory and the analysis of separated flows. The authors then consider supersonic flow past a thin aerofoil, where the linear approximation leads to the Ackeret formula for the pressure. They also discuss the second order Buzemann approximation, and the flow behaviour at large distances from the aerofoil. Then the properties of transonic and hypersonic flows are examined in detail. Part 2 concludes with a discussion of viscous low-Reynolds-number flows. Two classical problems of the low-Reynolds-number flow theory are considered, the flow past a sphere and the flow past a circular cylinder. In both cases the flow analysis leads to a difficulty, known as Stokes paradox. The authors show that this paradox can be resolved using the formalism of matched asymptotic expansions.
This is the first book in a four-part series designed to give a comprehensive and coherent description of Fluid Dynamics, starting with chapters on classical theory suitable for an introductory undergraduate lecture course, and then progressing through more advanced material up to the level of modern research in the field. The present Part 1 consists of four chapters. Chapter 1 begins with a discussion of Continuum Hypothesis, which isfollowed by an introduction to macroscopic functions, the velocity vector, pressure, density, and enthalpy. We then analyse the forces acting inside a fluid, and deduce the Navier-Stokes equations forincompressible and compressible fluids in Cartesian and curvilinear coordinates. In Chapter 2 we study the properties of a number of flows that are presented by the so-called exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, including the Couette flow between two parallel plates, Hagen-Poiseuille flow through a pipe, and Karman flow above an infinite rotating disk. Chapter 3 is devoted to the inviscid incompressible flow theory, with particular focus on two-dimensional potential flows. We discussin detail the method of conformal mapping, which is then used to study various flows of interest, including the flows past Joukovskii aerofoils. The final Chapter 4 is concerned with compressibleflows of perfect gas, including supersonic flows. Particular attention is given to the theory of characteristics, which is used, for example, to analyse the Prandtl-Meyer flow over a body surface bend and a corner.
Rationality - as opposed to 'ad-hoc' - and asymptotics - to emphasize the fact that perturbative methods are at the core of the theory - are the two main concepts associated with the Rational Asymptotic Modeling (RAM) approach in fluid dynamics when the goal is to specifically provide useful models accessible to numerical simulation via high-speed computing. This approach has contributed to a fresh understanding of Newtonian fluid flow problems and has opened up new avenues for tackling real fluid flow phenomena, which are known to lead to very difficult mathematical and numerical problems irrespective of turbulence. With the present scientific autobiography the author guides the reader through his somewhat non-traditional career; first discovering fluid mechanics, and then devoting more than fifty years to intense work in the field. Using both personal and general historical contexts, this account will be of benefit to anyone interested in the early and contemporary developments of an important branch of theoretical and computational fluid mechanics.
This 2003 monograph presents the GRP algorithm and is accessible to researchers and graduate students alike.
The second edition of Analytical Fluid Dynamics presents an expanded and updated treatment of inviscid and laminar viscous compressible flows from a theoretical viewpoint. It emphasizes basic assumptions, the physical aspects of flow, and the appropriate formulations of the governing equations for subsequent analytical treatment. Topics covered include Basic concepts A novel approach to linking complicated thermodynamics to the equations of motion Shockwave dynamics Calorically imperfect gas flows Supersonic sweep Shock-expansion interference Unsteady, one-dimensional flows First- and second-order boundary-layer theory Particularly noteworthy is a new, general treatment of forces and moments. The one-dimension flow chapter also discusses internal ballistics and the Riemann function method for solving hyperbolic equations. These two chapters, along with those dealing with thermodynamics, sweep, interference, imperfect gas glows, and several of the appendices are new to this edition. Analytical Fluid Dynamics: Second Edition answers the continued need for fluid dynamic books that combine physical insight with careful development of the corresponding mathematics. With his focus on the development of analytical skills for dealing with inviscid and viscous flow, the author achieves this goal and provides a text valuable as a research reference or a graduate-level text.
Modern experiments and numerical simulations show that the long-known coherent structures in turbulence take the form of elongated vortex tubes and vortex sheets. The evolution of vortex tubes may result in spiral structures which can be associated with the spectral power laws of turbulence. The mutual stretching of skewed vortex tubes, when they are close to each other, causes rapid growth of vorticity. Whether this process may or may not lead to a finite-time singularity is one of the famous open problems of fluid dynamics. This book contains the proceedings of the NATO ARW and IUTAM Symposium held in Zakopane, Poland, 2-7 September 2001. The papers presented, carefully reviewed by the International Scientific Committee, cover various aspects of the dynamics of vortex tubes and sheets and of their analogues in magnetohydrodynamics and in quantum turbulence. The book should be a useful reference for all researchers and students of modern fluid dynamics.
Integrates two fields generally held to be incompatible, if not downright antithetical, in 16 lectures from a February 1990 workshop at the Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois. The topics, of interest to industrial and applied mathematicians, analysts, and computer scientists, include singular per

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